Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Tooth and Diseases [Words]
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[PMID]: 29360619
[Au] Autor:Whyte MP; Coburn SP; Ryan LM; Ericson KL; Zhang F
[Ad] Address:Center for Metabolic Bone Disease and Molecular Research, Shriners Hospital for Children, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Division of Bone and Mineral Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address
[Ti] Title:Hypophosphatasia: Biochemical hallmarks validate the expanded pediatric clinical nosology.
[So] Source:Bone;110:96-106, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn-error-of-metabolism due to loss-of-function mutation(s) of the ALPL (TNSALP) gene that encodes the tissue non-specific isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). TNSALP represents a family of cell-surface phosphohydrolases differing by post-translational modification that is expressed especially in the skeleton, liver, kidney, and developing teeth. Thus, the natural substrates of TNSALP accumulate extracellularly in HPP including inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), a potent inhibitor of mineralization, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), the principal circulating form of vitamin B . The superabundance of extracellular PPi regularly causes tooth loss, and when sufficiently great can lead to rickets or osteomalacia. Sometimes diminished hydrolysis of PLP engenders vitamin B -dependent seizures in profoundly affected babies. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance from among >340 ALPL mutations identified to date, typically missense and located throughout the gene, largely explains the remarkably wide-ranging severity of HPP, greatest of all skeletal diseases. In 2015, our demographic, clinical, and DXA findings acquired over 25 years from 173 children and adolescents with HPP validated and expanded the clinical nosology for pediatric patients to include according to increasing severity "odonto" HPP, "mild childhood" HPP, "severe childhood" HPP, "infantile" HPP, and "perinatal" HPP. Herein, we assessed this expanded nosology using biochemical hallmarks of HPP. We evaluated exclusively data from the 165 preteenage HPP patients in this cohort to exclude potential effects from physiological changes in TNSALP levels across puberty. All patients had subnormal serum total and bone-specific ALP and elevated plasma PLP, and nearly all had excessive urinary PPi excretion. Only the PLP levels were unchanged across puberty. Mean levels of all four biomarkers correlated with HPP severity ranked according to the HPP nosology, but the data overlapped among all four patient groups. Hence, these four biochemical hallmarks represent both a sensitive and reliable tool for diagnosing children with HPP. Furthermore, the hallmarks validate our expanded clinical nosology for pediatric HPP that, with limitations, is an improved framework for conceptualizing and working with this disorder's remarkably broad-ranging severity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29364968
[Au] Autor:Petersone-Gordina E; Roberts C; Millard AR; Montgomery J; Gerhards G
[Ad] Address:Department of Archaeology, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Dental disease and dietary isotopes of individuals from St Gertrude Church cemetery, Riga, Latvia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191757, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This research explores oral health indicators and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data to explore diet, and differences in diet, between people buried in the four different contexts of the St Gertrude Church cemetery (15th- 17th centuries AD): the general cemetery, two mass graves, and a collective mass burial pit within the general cemetery. The main aim is to assess whether people buried in the mass graves were rural immigrants, or if they were more likely to be the victims of plague (or another epidemic) who lived in Riga and its suburbs. The data produced (from dental disease assessments and isotope analyses) were compared within, as well as between, the contexts. Most differences emerged when comparing the prevalence rates of dental diseases and other oral health indicators in males and females between the contexts, while isotope analysis revealed more individual, rather than context-specific, differences. The data suggested that the populations buried in the mass graves were different from those buried in the general cemetery, and support the theory that rural immigrants were buried in both mass graves. Significant differences were observed in some aspects of the data between the mass graves, however, possibly indicating that the people buried in them do not represent the same community.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cemeteries
Diet
Stomatognathic Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Carbon Isotopes/analysis
Humans
Latvia/epidemiology
Nitrogen Isotopes/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Carbon Isotopes); 0 (Nitrogen Isotopes)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191757

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[PMID]: 29518270
[Au] Autor:Hu B; Mccollum M; Ravi V; Arpag S; Moiseev D; Castoro R; Mobley BC; Burnette BW; Siskind C; Day JW; Yawn R; Feely S; Li Y; Yan Q; Shy ME; Li J
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Center for Human Genetic Research, and Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee.
[Ti] Title:Myelin Abnormality in CMT4J Recapitulates Features of Acquired Demyelination.
[So] Source:Ann Neurol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1531-8249
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4J (CMT4J) is a rare autosomal recessive neuropathy caused by mutations in FIG4 that result in loss of FIG4 protein. This study investigates the natural history and mechanisms of segmental demyelination in CMT4J. METHODS: Over the past 9 years, we have enrolled and studied a cohort of 12 CMT4J patients, including 6 novel FIG4 mutations. We evaluated these patients and related mouse models using morphological, electrophysiological and biochemical approaches. RESULTS: We found sensory motor demyelinating polyneuropathy consistently in all patients. This underlying myelin pathology was associated with non-uniform slowing of conduction velocities, conduction block, and temporal dispersion on nerve conduction studies (NCS), which resemble those features in acquired demyelinating peripheral nerve diseases. Segmental demyelination was also confirmed in mice without Fig4 (Fig4 ). The demyelination was associated with an increase of Schwann cell dedifferentiation and macrophages in spinal roots where nerve blood barriers are weak. Schwann cell dedifferentiation was induced by the increasing intracellular Ca . Suppression of Ca level by a chelator reduced dedifferentiation and demyelination of Schwann cells in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, cell-specific knockout of Fig4 in mouse Schwann cells or neurons failed to cause segmental demyelination. INTERPRETATION: Myelin change in CMT4J recapitulates the features of acquired demyelinating neuropathies. This pathology is not Schwann cell autonomous. Instead, it relates to systemic processes involving interactions of multiple cell types and abnormally elevated intracellular Ca . Injection of a Ca chelator in Fig4 mice improved segmental demyelination, thereby providing a therapeutic strategy against demyelination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ana.25198

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[PMID]: 29518149
[Au] Autor:Atsawasuwan P; Lazari P; Chen Y; Zhou X; Viana G; Evans CA
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Secretory microRNA-29 expression in gingival crevicular fluid during orthodontic tooth movement.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0194238, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Secretory microRNAs (miRNAs) have been used increasingly as biomarkers for cancers, autoimmune diseases and inflammatory diseases. They are reported as being freely circulated or encapsulated in microvesicles such as exosomes. This study was performed to elucidate the presence of miRNAs with exosomes in human gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and the expression profile of miRNA-29 during orthodontic tooth movement. Four healthy volunteer and fifteen orthodontic patients were enrolled in the study. Secretory miRNA in GCF was collected and analyzed using a bioanalyzer, realtime PCR and Western blot analysis. The expression profile of secretory miR-29 family in GCF was analyzed during the course of canine retraction for 6 weeks. The results demonstrated the presence of miRNAs in the GCF. After series of ultracentrifugation and RT-PCR array, exosome-depleted fractions and pellets were isolated and we found that secretory miRNAs were detected in both the exosome-associated fraction and the exosome-depleted supernatant fraction; however, the concentration of miRNAs was higher in the exosome-associated fraction than in the exosome-depleted fraction suggesting a close association between the secretory miRNAs and exosomes in GCF. We also demonstrated the increased expression profiles of miR-29 family during six weeks of orthodontic tooth movement in humans. Secretory miRNAs are present in GCF and secretory miRNA-29 family expression profiles increase during the tooth movement in humans. Secretory miRNA-29 in GCF could serve as potential biomarkers for periodontal remodeling.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0194238

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[PMID]: 29364827
[Au] Autor:Verma R; Jena AK; Singh SP; Utreja AK; Rattan V
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Gian Sagar Dental College and Hospital, Ramnagar, Banur, Punjab, India. rashmiverma.in@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Multidisciplinary management of post-ankylosis malocclusion and mandibular deformity.
[So] Source:J Clin Orthod;51(12):809-819, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0022-3875
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ankylosis/therapy
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Humans
Male
Malocclusion/etiology
Malocclusion/therapy
Patient Care Team
Retrognathia/etiology
Retrognathia/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 28289 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29203740
[Au] Autor:Kuroedova VD; Vyzhenko EE; Makarova AN; Galych LB; Chikor TA
[Ad] Address:Department Of Post-Graduate Education Of Orthodontists, Educational And Scientific Institute Of Post-Graduate Education, Higher State Educational Establishment Of Ukraine, "Ukrainian Medical Stomatological Academy", Poltava, Ukraine.
[Ti] Title:Optical density of upper jaw in patients with malocclusion.
[So] Source:Wiad Lek;70(5):913-916, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0043-5147
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The growth and formation of facial skeleton is in interrelation with growth of cervical spine. Computer tomography plays an important role to examine and investigate the density of bony tissue resulting from total increase of osteopenic diseases and diseases of periodontal tissue. The aim of the paper is to compare indices of mineral density of bony tissue of the upper jaw and mineral density of the second cervical vertebra in patients with malocclusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 37 orthodontic patients were involved in the investigation. They were divided into three age groups depending on the period of formation of dentofacial system. Density measurement of bone of the second cervical vertebra was done and also density measurement of upper jaw in the area of alveolar process between central incisors, canines and the first premolar on the level of the middle of roots, in the area of the first molars under the level of bifurcation and in cusp was performed. RESULTS: Optical density of bone of the second cervical vertebra with age increases from 501±61,06 to 587,6±48,81. The densest area on the upper jaw is alveolar process between central incisors, which increases with age from 1045,14±59,81 to 1318±69,28. The least indices of optical density were determined in area of the cusp of the upper jaw: the first group presented 174,21±38,94, and the third one included 338,87±26,91. CONCLUSIONS: Densitometry of bony tissue with computer tomography is diagnostically informative and available method for investigation and it can be used for diagnostics of bony tissue condition and for evaluation of orthodontic treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alveolar Process/diagnostic imaging
Bone Density/physiology
Cervical Vertebrae/diagnostic imaging
Malocclusion/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography
Dental Occlusion
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28467009
[Au] Autor:Dudovitz RN; Valiente JE; Espinosa G; Yepes C; Padilla C; Puffer M; Slavkin HC; Chung PJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, David Geffen School of Medicine, Children's Discovery & Innovation Institute, Mattel Children's Hospital, University of California Los Angeles.
[Ti] Title:A school-based public health model to reduce oral health disparities.
[So] Source:J Public Health Dent;78(1):9-16, 2018 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1752-7325
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Although dental decay is preventable, it remains the most common pediatric chronic disease. We describe a public health approach to implementing a scalable and sustainable school-based oral health program for low-income urban children. METHODS: The Los Angeles Trust for Children's Health, a nonprofit affiliated with the Los Angeles Unified School District, applied a public health model and developed a broad-based community-coalition to a) establish a District Oral Health Nurse position to coordinate oral health services, and b) implement a universal school-based oral health screening and fluoride varnishing program, with referral to a dental home. Key informant interviews and focus groups informed program development. Parent surveys assessed preventative oral health behaviors and access to oral health services. Results from screening exams, program costs and rates of reimbursement were recorded. RESULTS: From 2012 to 2015, six elementary schools and three dental provider groups participated. Four hundred ninety-one parents received oral health education and 89 served as community oral health volunteers; 3,399 screenings and fluoride applications were performed on 2,776 children. Sixty-six percent of children had active dental disease, 27 percent had visible tooth decay, and 6 percent required emergent care. Of the 623 students who participated for two consecutive years, 56 percent had fewer or no visible caries at follow-up, while only 17 percent had additional disease. Annual program cost was $69.57 per child. CONCLUSIONS: Using a broad based, oral health coalition, a school-based universal screening and fluoride varnishing program can improve the oral health of children with a high burden of untreated dental diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jphd.12216

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[PMID]: 28453689
[Au] Autor:Maisonneuve P; Amar S; Lowenfels AB
[Ad] Address:Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Periodontal disease, edentulism, and pancreatic cancer: a meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Ann Oncol;28(5):985-995, 2017 05 01.
[Is] ISSN:1569-8041
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Periodontal disease (PD), now our commonest infectious disorder leads to tooth loss, and has been linked to various systemic diseases, including various types of cancer. The aim of this study is to provide a systematic review and a meta-analysis of the relationship between PD, edentulism, and pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients and methods: From an initial review of 327 references we selected eight studies concerning periodontitis or edentulism with sufficient quantitative information to allow us to examine the risk of PC. We used relative risks (RRs), hazard ratios, or odds ratios to measure the association between periodontitis, edentulism, and PC. We employed random effects models to obtain summary risks, and we also provide measures of study differences and possible biases. Results: The summary RR for periodontitis and PC was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-2.15] and 1.54 for edentulism (95% CI 1.16-2.05). There was no evidence of heterogeneity for either variable, and no evidence of publication bias. The studies included reports from three continents, suggesting that the association is generalizable. Most of the studies were adjusted for variables thought to be associated with PC, such as gender, smoking, BMI, diabetes, and alcohol. Conclusions: Using meta-analysis, both periodontitis and edentulism appear to be associated with PC, even after adjusting for common risk factors. As yet, the mechanisms linking oral disease and PC are uncertain, but could be related to changes in the oral microbiome-an area of current research.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pancreatic Neoplasms/etiology
Periodontal Diseases/complications
Tooth Loss/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Causality
Humans
Pancreatic Neoplasms/mortality
Periodontal Diseases/mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Factors
Tooth Loss/mortality
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/annonc/mdx019

  9 / 28289 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29509311
[Au] Autor:Pollaris E; Haspeslagh M; Van den Wyngaert G; Vlaminck L
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery and Anaesthesiology of Large Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 8920, Merelbeke, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Equine cheek teeth occlusal fissures: prevalence, association with dental wear abnormalities and occlusal angles.
[So] Source:Equine Vet J;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2042-3306
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fissures of the occlusal surface of equine cheek teeth are commonly encountered during oral examination but their aetiology is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence and characteristics of occlusal fissures in cadaver teeth. It is hypothesised that their prevalence is influenced by masticatory forces. Consequently, their possible association with wear disorders and occlusal angles were examined. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. METHODS: The dental abnormalities and occlusal fissure findings in the cheek teeth of 143 cadaver heads were recorded. The cheek teeth occlusal angles were measured using the stiff-hinge technique. Multiple regression analyses were performed to establish possible relationships between age, sex, dental wear, occlusal angle and fissure prevalence. RESULTS: Occlusal fissures were found in 103/143 (72%) heads. Sex and age were determining factors in the prevalence of fissures. A similar prevalence was found in mandibular (54.1%) and maxillary teeth (45.9%, OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 0.95 - 1.29, p = 0.2). Mandibular fissures were more commonly located on the buccal aspect (OR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.16 - 1.65, p < 0.001) whereas for maxillary fissures there was no difference in prevalence between palatal and buccal aspects (OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 0.97 - 1.46, p = 0.1). Two main fissure types were identified. Type 1a fissures were the most prevalent type (39.5%). No significant correlation was found between the presence of wear abnormalities or the occlusal angle of cheek teeth, and the prevalence of fissures. MAIN LIMITATIONS: No dental histories were available. CONCLUSION: Equine cheek teeth show a high prevalence of occlusal fissures. Despite some evidence of predilection sites on the tooth surface that might indicate a mechanical aetiology for these lesions, no associations were found with wear abnormalities or occlusal angles of affected cheek teeth. Further histological and ultrastructural studies are warranted to elucidate their aetiology and possible role in other dental diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/evj.12828

  10 / 28289 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480863
[Au] Autor:Wu TC; Wu KL; Hu WL; Sheen JM; Lu CN; Chiang JY; Hung YC
[Ad] Address:Department of Chinese Medicine.
[Ti] Title:Tongue diagnosis indices for upper gastrointestinal disorders: Protocol for a cross-sectional, case-controlled observational study.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(2):e9607, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Upper gastrointestinal disorders are common in clinical practice, for example, gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Panendoscopy or upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is viewed as the primary tool for examining the upper gastrointestinal mucosa, and permitting biopsy and endoscopic therapy. Although panendoscopy is considered to be a safe procedure with minimal complications, there are still some adverse effects, and patients are often anxious about undergoing invasive procedures. Traditional Chinese medicine tongue diagnosis plays an important role in differentiation of symptoms because the tongue reflects the physiological and pathological condition of the body. The automatic tongue diagnosis system (ATDS), which noninvasively captures tongue images, can provide objective and reliable diagnostic information. METHODS: This protocol is a cross-sectional, case-controlled observational study investigating the usefulness of the ATDS in clinical practice by examining its efficacy as a diagnostic tool for upper gastrointestinal disorders. Volunteers over 20 years old with and without upper gastrointestinal symptoms will be enrolled. Tongue images will be captured and the patients divided into 4 groups according to their panendoscopy reports, including a gastritis group, peptic ulcer disease group, gastroesophageal reflux disease group, and healthy group. Nine primary tongue features will be extracted and analyzed, including tongue shape, tongue color, tooth mark, tongue fissure, fur color, fur thickness, saliva, ecchymosis, and red dots. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this protocol is to apply a noninvasive ATDS to evaluate tongue manifestations of patients with upper gastrointestinal disorders and examine its efficacy as a diagnostic tool.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis
Medicine, Chinese Traditional
Tongue
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Digestive System Diseases/pathology
Medicine, Chinese Traditional/instrumentation
Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods
Pattern Recognition, Automated
Tongue/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180227
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009607


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