Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Tooth and Mobility [Words]
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[PMID]: 29175404
[Au] Autor:Dehbandi R; Moore F; Keshavarzi B
[Ad] Address:Department of Earth Sciences, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, 71454, Iran. Electronic address: rezadehbandi65@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Geochemical sources, hydrogeochemical behavior, and health risk assessment of fluoride in an endemic fluorosis area, central Iran.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;193:763-776, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study is the first attempt to put forward the possible source(s) and health risk assessment of fluoride in Bahabad, central Iran. Fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.22 to 2.35 mg/L and 292-355 mg/kg in the groundwater and soil samples, respectively. Geochemical provenance techniques using major and rare earth elements in soils revealed that local shale is the most probable source rock of fluoride in the area. A two-step chemical fractionation method applied on soil samples demonstrated that residual and water-soluble fractions were the most probable modes of fluoride in soil, whereas exchangeable fraction had a minor role. The coefficient of aqueous migration showed that fluoride in the studied soils behaved as a mobile element. Moreover, the relative mobility indicated that soils played a more important role than rocks in releasing fluoride into groundwater. In groundwater medium, chemical weathering, evaporation, and ion exchange acted as the main geochemical controlling factors of fluoride enrichment. Findings of this study signify that the role of NaCl and NaSO -type waters should be considered more to recognize susceptible areas to fluoride contamination in groundwater. People in the study area are exposed to high levels of fluoride intake through drinking water, thus making dental fluorosis a major public health concern in the area. Scanning electron microscopy of the dentin's enamel showed morphological modifications (e.g., cracks and fissures) in residents' enamel structures. The results of this study may lead to suitable management strategies to mitigate the endemic fluorosis problem.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Environmental Monitoring/methods
Environmental Pollution
Fluorides/adverse effects
Risk Assessment
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Fluorides/analysis
Fluorosis, Dental/epidemiology
Fluorosis, Dental/etiology
Groundwater/chemistry
Humans
Ion Exchange
Iran
Soil/chemistry
Tooth Erosion/diagnostic imaging
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Soil); Q80VPU408O (Fluorides)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29436627
[Au] Autor:Liu X; Wang Y; Zhang L; Xu Z; Chu Q; Xu C; Sun Y; Gao Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Biology, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong 261053, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Combination of Runx2 and Cbfß upregulates Amelotin gene expression in ameloblasts by directly interacting with cis­enhancers during amelogenesis.
[So] Source:Mol Med Rep;17(4):6068-6076, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1791-3004
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Amelotin (Amtn) is a recently identified enamel protein secreted by ameloblasts at late stage of enamel development. Runt­related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in combination with the coactivator core­binding factor ß (Cbfß) regulates the early stages of tooth development. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Runx2 in the regulation of Amtn gene expression in ameloblasts. Immunohistochemistry was performed and the results revealed that Runx2 protein was predominantly expressed in the nuclei of ameloblasts during the transition stage and the maturation stage of enamel development, whereas Cbfß was expressed in ameloblasts from the secretory stage to the maturation stage. Reverse transcription­quantitative polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated that Runx2 knockdown decreased Amtn expression in ameloblast­lineage cells and co­expression of Runx2 and Cbfß in ameloblast lineage cells induced an upregulation in Amtn gene expression. Two putative Runx2­binding sites within the Amtn promoter were identified using bioinformatics analysis. Results of an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that Runx2/Cbfß bound to specific DNA sequences. Site­directed mutagenesis of the Runx2 binding sites within the Amtn promoter resulted in decreased basal promoter activity and did not affect the overexpressed Runx2/Cbfß. The results of the present study suggest that Runx2 upregulates Amtn gene expression via binding directly to Runx2 sites within the Amtn promoter during amelogenesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/mmr.2018.8564

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[PMID]: 29509314
[Au] Autor:de Melo MCF; Silva de Macedo T; Biserra JA; Rodrigues KLC; Cruz M; Vidal AKL
[Ad] Address:Resident Dentist, Residency Program in Hospital Dentistry Focusing on Oncology, University of Pernambuco, ICB/HUOC/UPE.
[Ti] Title:The use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in oral injuries of a pediatric patient with myelodysplastic syndrome: case report.
[So] Source:Spec Care Dentist;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1754-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To report a case of a pediatric patient carrier of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with severe oral infectious disease, in which antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) was used as a therapeutic choice to support systemic treatment. METHODS AND RESULTS: This case report refers to a 1-year-old male patient with MDS and hospitalized for investigation and treatment of complications at a Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Center in Recife/PE, Brazil. The intraoral examination revealed a violaceous lesion surrounding the lower incisor teeth, which progressed with alteration of color to milky yellowish white, compromising the entire lower gingival border, leading to tooth mobility and consequent loss of teeth 71 and 81. The patient was treated under systemic antimicrobial therapy and aPDT was also performed, using a photosensitizing agent (methylene blue, 0.01%) and a low-intensity laser in the visible red spectrum. Oral clinical improvement was observed, but the patient died after 45 days of hospitalization in the Pediatric ICU due to other systemic complications. CONCLUSION: MDS may present limiting oral repercussions interfering in patients' quality of life. The aPDT is presented as an adjuvant therapeutic modality in oral infections with satisfactory results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/scd.12275

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[PMID]: 29496206
[Au] Autor:Vairamuthu T; Pfeiffer S
[Ad] Address:Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, 19 Russell Street, Toronto M5S 2S2, Canada. Electronic address: Thivviya.vairamuthu@mail.utoronto.ca.
[Ti] Title:A juvenile with compromised osteogenesis provides insights into past hunter-gatherer lives.
[So] Source:Int J Paleopathol;20:1-9, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1879-9825
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Late Archaic in northeastern North America (4500-2800 B.P.) pre-dates reliance on pottery and domesticated plants. It is thought to reflect a highly mobile, seasonal migratory foraging/hunting regimen. A juvenile skeleton with pervasive bone wasting and fragile jaws from the Hind Site (AdHk-1), ca. 3000 B.P., southwestern Ontario, provides evidence of the social context of her family group, including aspects of mobility and food management. The well-preserved bones and teeth are considered in bioarchaeological context. Radiographic, osteometric and cross-sectional geometric approaches to assessing musculoskeletal function are presented, plus differential diagnosis of the bone wasting condition. All bones of the probable female (aged approx. 16yr) show stunting and wasting. Wedged lower vertebral bodies, porous trabeculae, undeveloped bicondylar angles (femur) and abnormally low cortical long bone mass are consistent with chronically reduced ambulation. Few teeth remain in the dramatically resorbed alveoli; slight tooth wear and substantial calculus suggest a modified (soft) diet. Osteogenesis imperfecta type IV is the most probable etiology. The extended survival of this juvenile who may never have walked reflects collective care. The case provides evidence of a past lifeway that appears to have been organized around logistic mobility, including occupational stability and food storage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29493254
[Au] Autor:Deliberador TM; Begnini GJ; Tomazinho F; Rezende CEE; Florez FLE; Leonardi DP
[Ad] Address:Graduate Program in Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Immediate Implant Placement and Provisionalization Using the Patient's Extracted Crown: 12-Month Follow-Up.
[So] Source:Compend Contin Educ Dent;39(3):e18-e21, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2158-1797
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Immediate placement and provisionalization of implants in fresh sockets has been previously demonstrated to be a predictable treatment in the restoration of non-recoverable teeth in the anterior regions of the maxilla. PURPOSE: This article reports a clinical case in which an immediate implant placement protocol was used in combination with two distinct and sequential grafts (bovine bone and connective tissue, respectively) followed by immediate implant provisionalization using the patient's crown of an extracted tooth. CLINICAL REPORT: Physical, clinical, and image examinations of the patient (female, 23 years old) revealed a maxillary central incisor (tooth No. 8) with slight mobility due the presence of extensive cervical resorption. The treatment proposed was the atraumatic extraction of the tooth followed by immediate implant placement and provisionalization. Two grafts (bovine bone and connective tissue) were used due to the presence of a very thin maxillary bone plate associated with a thin gingival biotype. RESULTS: The use of the extracted crown as a temporary crown after immediate implant placement resulted in immediate attainment of an esthetically pleasing outcome and long-term favorable results. CONCLUSION: The treatment protocol proposed can be efficiently used to immediately restore the patient's esthetics and function while maintaining the health, volume, and contours of gingival tissues over a 12-month follow-up period. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Anterior teeth extractions typically require the execution of single-unit prostheses using dental materials of synthetic origin (such as polymers), which often are incapable of achieving the esthetic and physiological results patients expect. The use of the patient's own crown was demonstrated, which allowed good clinical results to be achieved and the natural shape and function of tissues to be maintained.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29291254
[Au] Autor:Manresa C; Sanz-Miralles EC; Twigg J; Bravo M
[Ad] Address:Adult Comprehensive Dentistry, Dental School, University of Barcelona, Feixa LLarga s/n, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain, 08907.
[Ti] Title:Supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) for maintaining the dentition in adults treated for periodontitis.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;1:CD009376, 2018 01 01.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Periodontitis is a bacterially-induced, chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the connective tissues and bone that support teeth. Active periodontal treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory response, primarily through eradication of bacterial deposits. Following completion of treatment and arrest of inflammation, supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) is employed to reduce the probability of re-infection and progression of the disease; to maintain teeth without pain, excessive mobility or persistent infection in the long term, and to prevent related oral diseases.According to the American Academy of Periodontology, SPT should include all components of a typical dental recall examination, and importantly should also include periodontal re-evaluation and risk assessment, supragingival and subgingival removal of bacterial plaque and calculus, and re-treatment of any sites showing recurrent or persistent disease. While the first four points might be expected to form part of the routine examination appointment for periodontally healthy patients, the inclusion of thorough periodontal evaluation, risk assessment and subsequent treatment - normally including mechanical debridement of any plaque or calculus deposits - differentiates SPT from routine care.Success of SPT has been reported in a number of long-term, retrospective studies. This review aimed to assess the evidence available from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) in the maintenance of the dentition of adults treated for periodontitis. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 8 May 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 5), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 8 May 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 8 May 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating SPT versus monitoring only or alternative approaches to mechanical debridement; SPT alone versus SPT with adjunctive interventions; different approaches to or providers of SPT; and different time intervals for SPT delivery.We excluded split-mouth studies where we considered there could be a risk of contamination.Participants must have completed active periodontal therapy at least six months prior to randomisation and be enrolled in an SPT programme. Trials must have had a minimum follow-up period of 12 months. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened search results to identify studies for inclusion, assessed the risk of bias in included studies and extracted study data. When possible, we calculated mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for continuous variables. Two review authors assessed the quality of evidence for each comparison and outcome using GRADE criteria. MAIN RESULTS: We included four trials involving 307 participants aged 31 to 85 years, who had been previously treated for moderate to severe chronic periodontitis. Three studies compared adjuncts to mechanical debridement in SPT versus debridement only. The adjuncts were local antibiotics in two studies (one at high risk of bias and one at low risk) and photodynamic therapy in one study (at unclear risk of bias). One study at high risk of bias compared provision of SPT by a specialist versus general practitioner. We did not identify any RCTs evaluating the effects of SPT versus monitoring only, or of providing SPT at different time intervals, or that compared the effects of mechanical debridement using different approaches or technologies.No included trials measured our primary outcome 'tooth loss'; however, studies evaluated signs of inflammation and potential periodontal disease progression, including bleeding on probing (BoP), clinical attachment level (CAL) and probing pocket depth (PPD).There was no evidence of a difference between SPT delivered by a specialist versus a general practitioner for BoP or PPD at 12 months (very low-quality evidence). This study did not measure CAL or adverse events.Due to heterogeneous outcome reporting, it was not possible to combine data from the two studies comparing mechanical debridement with or without the use of adjunctive local antibiotics. Both studies found no evidence of a difference between groups at 12 months (low to very low-quality evidence). There were no adverse events in either study.The use of adjunctive photodynamic therapy did not demonstrate evidence of benefit compared to mechanical debridement only (very low-quality evidence). Adverse events were not measured.The quality of the evidence is low to very low for these comparisons. Future research is likely to change the findings, therefore the results should be interpreted with caution. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is insufficient evidence to determine the superiority of different protocols or adjunctive strategies to improve tooth maintenance during SPT. No trials evaluated SPT versus monitoring only. The evidence available for the comparisons evaluated is of low to very low quality, and hampered by dissimilarities in outcome reporting. More trials using uniform definitions and outcomes are required to address the objectives of this review.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Chronic Periodontitis/therapy
Periodontal Debridement/methods
Periodontics/methods
Photochemotherapy/methods
Tooth Loss/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Periodontitis/complications
Dental Plaque/therapy
Humans
Middle Aged
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180102
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009376.pub2

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[PMID]: 29306536
[Au] Autor:Chaniotis A
[Ad] Address:Endodontics, Warwick Dentistry/Athens Dental School, Kalithea, Atiki, Greece. Electronic address: antch8@me.com.
[Ti] Title:Orthodontic Movement after Regenerative Endodontic Procedure: Case Report and Long-term Observations.
[So] Source:J Endod;44(3):432-437, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3554
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Although regenerative treatment approaches in teeth with incomplete root formation and pulp necrosis have become part of the suggested therapeutic endodontic spectrum, little is known about the effect of orthodontic movement in the tissue that has been regenerated. Furthermore, as the number of adults undergoing orthodontic treatment increases, there is an increasing need to investigate the changes that these tissues may undergo during orthodontic movement. Here we describe the alterations observed after the application of orthodontic forces in a case of an apically root-fractured necrotic immature root that had been managed with regenerative endodontic procedures in the past. METHODS: A 9-year-old male patient was referred after suffering the third incidence of trauma in the anterior maxilla. Radiographic evaluation revealed a periapical rarefaction associated with an apically root-fractured immature central incisor. Clinical evaluation revealed a buccal abscess and grade 3 tooth mobility. Periodontal probing was within normal limits. The tooth was accessed and disinfected by using apical negative pressure irrigation of 6% NaOCl. Intracanal dentin conditioning was achieved by using 17% EDTA for 5 minutes. A blood clot was induced from the periapical area, and calcium silicate-based cement was placed in direct contact with the blood clot at the same visit. The composite resin restoration was accomplished in the same appointment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Recall radiographic examination after 24 months revealed healing of the periapical lesion and signs of continuous root development despite the apical root fracture. Clinical evaluation revealed normal tooth development, normal mobility, and a resolving buccal infection. The tooth was subjected to orthodontic treatment because of Class II division 1 malocclusion with an overjet of 11 mm. After completion of the orthodontic treatment, 5.5 years after the initial intervention, the radiographic image revealed marked remodeling of the periapical tissues and repair of the apical fractures, and the buccal infection had resolved completely.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29311021
[Au] Autor:Chrcanovic BR; Gomez RS
[Ad] Address:Department of Prosthodontics, (Head: Dr. Liselott Lindh, DDS, PhD), Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: bruno.chrcanovic@mah.se.
[Ti] Title:Squamous odontogenic tumor and squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations in odontogenic cysts: An updated analysis of 170 cases reported in the literature.
[So] Source:J Craniomaxillofac Surg;46(3):504-510, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4119
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To integrate the available data published on squamous odontogenic tumors (SOT) and squamous odontogenic tumor-like proliferations in odontogenic cysts (SOT-LPOC) into a comprehensive analysis of their clinical/radiologic features. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic search was undertaken in January 2017. Eligibility criteria included publications having enough clinical/radiological/histological information to confirm a definite diagnosis. RESULTS: A total of 74 publications reporting 110 SOTs (102 central, 8 peripheral) and 60 SOT-LPOC were included. Compared to SOT-LPOC, SOT showed lower mean age, no preference regarding maxilla or mandible localization, significant association with cortical bone perforation, multilocular radiographic appearance, and mobility of the tooth/teeth associated with the lesion. While 5 recurrent SOT were reported after enucleation, no recurrent SOT-LPOC was found. CONCLUSIONS: SOT shows a more aggressive biologic behavior than SOT-LPOC, which supports the hypothesis that the two lesions are distinct clinicopathological conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29337188
[Au] Autor:Liu C; Zhou N; Wang Y; Zhang H; Jani P; Wang X; Lu Y; Li N; Xiao J; Qin C
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Biology, College of Stomatology, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning 116044, China; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. Electronic address: cliu@dmu.edu.cn.
[Ti] Title:Abrogation of Fam20c altered cell behaviors and BMP signaling of immortalized dental mesenchymal cells.
[So] Source:Exp Cell Res;, 2018 Jan 11.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2422
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:FAM20C mutations compromise the mineralization of skeleton and tooth in both human and mouse. Putatively, the mineralization disorder is attributed to the elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), which reduced the serum phosphorus by suppressing the reabsorption of phosphorus in kidney. Besides the regulation on systemic phosphorus homeostasis, FAM20C was also implicated to regulate cell behaviors and gene expression through a cell-autonomous manner. To identify the primary effects of Fam20c on dental mesenchymal cells, mouse Fam20c-deficient dental mesenchymal cells were generated by removing the floxed alleles from the immortalized mouse Fam20c dental mesenchymal cells with Cre-expressing lentivirus. The removal of Fam20c exerted no impact on cell morphology, but suppressed the proliferation and mobility of the dental mesenchymal cells. Fam20c deficiency also significantly reduced the expression of Osterix, Runx2, type I Collagen a 1 (Col1a1), Alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) and the members of the small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family, but increased Fgf23 expression. Consistently, the in vitro mineralization of Fam20c-deficient dental mesenchymal cells was severely disabled. However, supplements of the non-collagenous proteins from wild type rat dentin failed to rescue the compromised mineralization, suggesting that the roles of FAM20C in tooth mineralization are more than phosphorylating local matrices and regulating systemic phosphorus metabolism. Moreover, the down-regulated BMP signaling pathways in the Fam20c deficient dental mesenchymal cells revealed that the kinase activity of FAM20C might be required to maintain BMP signaling. In summary, our study discloses that Fam20c indeed regulates cell behaviors and cell signaling pathway in a cell-autonomous manner.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 3764 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29320542
[Au] Autor:Matisoo-Smith E; Gosling AL; Platt D; Kardailsky O; Prost S; Cameron-Christie S; Collins CJ; Boocock J; Kurumilian Y; Guirguis M; Pla Orquín R; Khalil W; Genz H; Abou Diwan G; Nassar J; Zalloua P
[Ad] Address:Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Ancient mitogenomes of Phoenicians from Sardinia and Lebanon: A story of settlement, integration, and female mobility.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190169, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Phoenicians emerged in the Northern Levant around 1800 BCE and by the 9th century BCE had spread their culture across the Mediterranean Basin, establishing trading posts, and settlements in various European Mediterranean and North African locations. Despite their widespread influence, what is known of the Phoenicians comes from what was written about them by the Greeks and Egyptians. In this study, we investigate the extent of Phoenician integration with the Sardinian communities they settled. We present 14 new ancient mitogenome sequences from pre-Phoenician (~1800 BCE) and Phoenician (~700-400 BCE) samples from Lebanon (n = 4) and Sardinia (n = 10) and compare these with 87 new complete mitogenomes from modern Lebanese and 21 recently published pre-Phoenician ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia to investigate the population dynamics of the Phoenician (Punic) site of Monte Sirai, in southern Sardinia. Our results indicate evidence of continuity of some lineages from pre-Phoenician populations suggesting integration of indigenous Sardinians in the Monte Sirai Phoenician community. We also find evidence of the arrival of new, unique mitochondrial lineages, indicating the movement of women from sites in the Near East or North Africa to Sardinia, but also possibly from non-Mediterranean populations and the likely movement of women from Europe to Phoenician sites in Lebanon. Combined, this evidence suggests female mobility and genetic diversity in Phoenician communities, reflecting the inclusive and multicultural nature of Phoenician society.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Demography
Ethnic Groups/history
Genome, Mitochondrial
Human Migration/history
Women
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Child
Culture
DNA, Mitochondrial/analysis
DNA, Mitochondrial/isolation & purification
Ethnic Groups/genetics
Female
Genetic Variation
Haplotypes
History, Ancient
Humans
Italy
Lebanon/ethnology
Mediterranean Region
Phylogeny
Population Dynamics
Tooth
[Pt] Publication type:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Mitochondrial)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190169


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