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[PMID]: 29514704
[Au] Autor:Schmidt N; Barth SA; Frahm J; Meyer U; Dänicke S; Geue L; Menge C
[Ad] Address:Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI)/Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Molecular Pathogenesis, Jena, Germany. Nadine.Schmidt@vetmed.uni-giessen.de.
[Ti] Title:Decreased STEC shedding by cattle following passive and active vaccination based on recombinant Escherichia coli Shiga toxoids.
[So] Source:Vet Res;49(1):28, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1297-9716
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The principal virulence factor of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), the eponymous Stx, modulates cellular immune responses in cattle, the primary STEC reservoir. We examined whether immunization with genetically inactivated recombinant Shiga toxoids (rStx1 /rStx2 ) influences STEC shedding in a calf cohort. A group of 24 calves was passively (colostrum from immunized cows) and actively (intra-muscularly at 5 and 8 week) vaccinated. Twenty-four calves served as unvaccinated controls (fed with low anti-Stx colostrum, placebo injected). Each group was divided according to the vitamin E concentration they received by milk replacer (moderate and high supplemented). The effective transfer of Stx-neutralizing antibodies from dams to calves via colostrum was confirmed by Vero cell assay. Serum antibody titers in calves differed significantly between the vaccinated and the control group until the 16 week of life. Using the expression of activation marker CD25 on CD4 CD45RO cells and CD8α CD45RO cells as flow cytometry based read-out, cells from vaccinated animals responded more pronounced than those of control calves to lysates of STEC and E. coli strains isolated from the farm as well as to rStx2 in the 16 week. Summarized for the entire observation period, less fecal samples from vaccinated calves were stx and/or stx positive than samples from control animals when calves were fed a moderate amount of vitamin E. This study provides first evidence, that transfer to and induction in young calves of Stx-neutralizing antibodies by Shiga toxoid vaccination offers the opportunity to reduce the incidence of stx-positive fecal samples in a calf cohort.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13567-018-0523-0

  2 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29483032
[Au] Autor:Healy J; Rodriguez-Lainz A; Elam-Evans LD; Hill HA; Reagan-Steiner S; Yankey D
[Ad] Address:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development, Epidemic Intelligence Service, USA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, San Diego, CA, USA; County of San Diego Health and Human Services Ag
[Ti] Title:Vaccination coverage among foreign-born and U.S.-born adolescents in the United States: Successes and gaps - National Immunization Survey-Teen, 2012-2014.
[So] Source:Vaccine;36(13):1743-1750, 2018 Mar 20.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: An overall increase has been reported in vaccination rates among adolescents during the past decade. Studies of vaccination coverage have shown disparities when comparing foreign-born and U.S.-born populations among children and adults; however, limited information is available concerning potential disparities in adolescents. METHODS: The National Immunization Survey-Teen is a random-digit-dialed telephone survey of caregivers of adolescents aged 13-17 years, followed by a mail survey to vaccination providers that is used to estimate vaccination coverage among the U.S. population of adolescents. Using the National Immunization Survey-Teen data, we assessed vaccination coverage during 2012-2014 among adolescents for routinely recommended vaccines for this age group (≥1 dose tetanus and diphtheria toxoids and acellular pertussis [Tdap] vaccine, ≥1 dose quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate [MenACWY] vaccine, ≥3 doses human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccine) and for routine childhood vaccination catch-up doses (≥2 doses measles, mumps, and rubella [MMR] vaccine, ≥2 doses varicella vaccine, and ≥3 doses hepatitis B [HepB] vaccine). Vaccination coverage prevalence and vaccination prevalence ratios were estimated. RESULTS: Of the 58,090 respondents included, 3.3% were foreign-born adolescents. Significant differences were observed between foreign-born and U.S.-born adolescents for insurance status, income-to-poverty ratio, education, interview language, and household size. Foreign-born adolescents had significantly lower unadjusted vaccination coverage for HepB (89% vs. 93%), and higher coverage for the recommended ≥3 doses of HPV vaccine among males, compared with U.S.-born adolescents (22% vs. 14%). Adjustment for demographic and socioeconomic factors accounted for the disparity in HPV but not HepB vaccination coverage. CONCLUSIONS: We report comparable unadjusted vaccination coverage among foreign-born and U.S.-born adolescents for Tdap, MenACWY, MMR, ≥2 varicella. Although coverage was high for HepB vaccine, it was significantly lower among foreign-born adolescents, compared with U.S.-born adolescents. HPV and ≥2-dose varicella vaccination coverage were low among both groups.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29421216
[Au] Autor:Malyala P; Laera D; Cianetti S; Bufali S; Aggravi M; Ianni E; Judge C; Otten G; Singh M; O' Hagan DT
[Ad] Address:Technical & Research Department, GSK Vaccines, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139.
[Ti] Title:The Preparation and Physicochemical Characterization of Aluminum Hydroxide/TLR7a, a Novel Vaccine Adjuvant Comprising a Small Molecule Adsorbed to Aluminum Hydroxide.
[So] Source:J Pharm Sci;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6017
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adjuvants are necessary to enable vaccine development against a significant number of challenging pathogens for which effective vaccines are not available. We engineered a novel small-molecule immune potentiator, a benzonaphthyridine agonist targeting toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), as a vaccine adjuvant. TLR7 agonist (TLR7a) was engineered to be adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), and the resulting AlOH/TLR7a was evaluated as a vaccine adjuvant. AlOH/TLR7a exploits the flexibility of AlOH formulations, has an application in many vaccine candidates, and induced good efficacy and safety profiles against all tested antigens (bacterial- and viral-derived protein antigens, toxoids, glycoconjugates, and so forth) in many animal models, including nonhuman primates. In this article, we describe the outcome of the physicochemical characterization of AlOH/TLR7a. Reverse-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, zeta potential, and phosphophilicity assays were used as tools to demonstrate the association of TLR7a to AlOH and to characterize this novel formulation. Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy were also used to investigate the interaction between TLR7a and AlOH (data not shown). This pivotal work paved the way for AlOH/TLR7a to progress into the clinic for evaluation as an adjuvant platform for vaccines against challenging preventable diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29266448
[Au] Autor:Nakayama T; Kashiwagi Y; Kawashima H
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Viral Infection, Kitasato Institute for Life Sciences, Shirokane 5-9-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8641, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Long-term regulation of local cytokine production following immunization in mice.
[So] Source:Microbiol Immunol;62(2):124-131, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1348-0421
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vaccines based on pathogen components require adjuvants to enhance the antigen-specific adaptive immune response. Intramuscular injection of adjuvanted-vaccines induces inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory nodules at the injection site within 48 hr after injection (Vaccine 2014; 32: 3393-401). In the present study, long-term regulation of cytokine production was investigated at 3, 6, 24, and 48 hr, 5 and 7 days, and 2 and 4 weeks after immunization with human papilloma virus (HPV), diphtheria and tetanus toxoids combined with acellular pertussis (DTaP), Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib), and pneumococcal conjugated (PCV) vaccines in mouse models. The second dose was given 4 weeks later, and cytokine profiles were investigated 2, 5, and 7 days after re-immunization. IL-1ß, IL-6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), and MCP-1 were produced from 3 hr and peaked at 48 hr after immunization with Cervarix in mice. IL-4, MCP-1, and TNF-α peaked at 5 or 7 days after immunization with Gardasil. These cytokines decreased 7 days after immunization with Cervarix and Gardasil. After the second dose, similar responses were observed. Both vaccines induced neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) in inflammatory nodules. The peak amount of IL-1ß, IL-6, G-CSF, and MCP-1 was observed on day 5 of immunization and that of IL-4 on days 5-7 of immunization with DTaP, but no increase in IL-6 and G-CSF was observed after re-immunization. A similar response was noted after immunization with PCV13. An inflammatory response is essential for the development of adaptive immunity through the production of inflammatory cytokines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180215
[Lr] Last revision date:180215
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/1348-0421.12566

  5 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29249542
[Au] Autor:Rowell J; Lo CY; Price GE; Misplon JA; Epstein SL; Garcia M
[Ad] Address:Division of Cellular and Gene Therapies, Office of Tissues and Advanced Therapies, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, USA.
[Ti] Title:Conventional influenza vaccines influence the performance of a universal influenza vaccine in mice.
[So] Source:Vaccine;36(7):1008-1015, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Universal influenza vaccines are designed to protect against diverse strains of influenza virus. Preclinical testing of new vaccine candidates is usually done in naïve animals, despite intended use in the human population with its varied immune history including responses to previous vaccinations. As an approach more relevant to human use, we tested a candidate universal influenza vaccine in mice with a history of conventional vaccination. Female BALB/c mice were given two intramuscular doses of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) or diphtheria and tetanus toxoids vaccine (DT), one month apart. Another group was given two intranasal doses of live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV). One month after the second dose, mice were given the universal influenza vaccine: recombinant adenoviruses expressing influenza A nucleoprotein (A/NP) and matrix 2 (M2) (A/NP + M2-rAd). Immune responses to universal vaccine antigens A/NP and M2 were assessed by ELISA and interferon-γ ELISPOT. Protection was tested by challenge with mouse-adapted A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) and monitoring for weight loss and survival. Universal vaccine performance was enhanced, inhibited or unaffected by particular prior vaccinations. Mice given Afluria IIV and LAIV had greater antibody and T-cell response to A/NP than mice without prior vaccination, providing examples of enhanced A/NP + M2-rAd performance. Though Fluvirin IIV partially inhibited, the universal vaccine still provided considerable protection unlike conventional vaccination. Fluzone IIV and DT had no effect on A/NP + M2-rAd performance. Thus our results demonstrate that universal vaccine candidate A/NP + M2-rAd was at least partially effective in mice with diverse prior histories. However, the degree of protection and nature of the immune responses may be affected by a history of conventional vaccination and suggests that performance in humans would be influenced by immune history.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29240729
[Au] Autor:Zhao D; Ma R; Zhou T; Yang F; Wu J; Sun H; Liu F; Lu L; Li X; Zuo S; Yao W; Yin J
[Ti] Title:Introduction of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine and Impact on Vaccine-Associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis - Beijing, China, 2014-2016.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;66(49):1357-1361, 2017 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:When included in a sequential polio vaccination schedule, inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) reduces the risk for vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP), a rare adverse event associated with receipt of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). During January 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended introduction of at least 1 IPV dose into routine immunization schedules in OPV-using countries (1). The Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 recommended completion of IPV introduction in 2015 and globally synchronized withdrawal of OPV type 2 in 2016 (2). Introduction of 1 dose of IPV into Beijing's Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) on December 5, 2014 represented China's first province-wide IPV introduction. Coverage with the first dose of polio vaccine was maintained from 96.2% to 96.9%, similar to coverage with the first dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine (DTP) (96.5%-97.2%); the polio vaccine dropout rate (the percentage of children who received the first dose of polio vaccine but failed to complete the series) was 1.0% in 2015 and 0.4% in 2016. The use of 3 doses of private-sector IPV per child decreased from 18.1% in 2014, to 17.4% in 2015, and to 14.8% in 2016. No cases of VAPP were identified during 2014-2016. Successful introduction of IPV into the public sector EPI program was attributed to comprehensive planning, preparation, implementation, robust surveillance for adverse events after immunization (AEFI), and monitoring of vaccination coverage. This evaluation provided information that helped contribute to the expansion of IPV use in China and in other OPV-using countries.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Paralysis/prevention & control
Poliomyelitis/prevention & control
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Beijing/epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Immunization Programs
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Paralysis/chemically induced
Paralysis/epidemiology
Poliomyelitis/chemically induced
Poliomyelitis/epidemiology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral/adverse effects
Program Evaluation
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated); 0 (Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180119
[Lr] Last revision date:180119
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6649a4

  7 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29292622
[Au] Autor:Levy Y
[Ad] Address:Kipper Institute of Immunology, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikva, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv.
[Ti] Title:[ALLERGIC REACTIONS TO CHILDHOOD VACCINATIONS].
[So] Source:Harefuah;156(12):799-803, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0017-7768
[Cp] Country of publication:Israel
[La] Language:heb
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Childhood vaccinations are one of the greatest achievements of modern medicine, having significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality of many infectious diseases all over the world. Anaphylactic reaction to vaccinations is rare and is estimated to occur at a rate of 1 per million doses. Allergic reaction to vaccinations can be induced by the microbial antigens, toxoids, and also by residual proteins which are derived from cultures media and stabilizers, such as ovalbumine, gelatin and yeasts. Other adverse events include large local reactions at the injection site, delayed rashes or hypotonic-hyporesponsive episodes. Parents of children who have experienced adverse reactions to vaccines, might unnecessarily be advised to avoid subsequent vaccinations. Therefore, it is important to evaluate these children in order to decide on the nature of the adverse event, whether there is a contraindication to subsequent vaccinations, and to assess the risk for future allergic reactions. If needed, skin tests with the relevant vaccines and administration of vaccines in graded doses under supervision and preparation for treatment of the anaphylactic reaction in the Allergy clinic, can ensure the effective completion of childhood immunizations. In this article, we will review the data on allergic reactions to childhood vaccinations, and the protocols suggested for the evaluation and management of children with food allergies and children who have experienced allergic reactions to vaccinations.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180102
[Lr] Last revision date:180102
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29145357
[Au] Autor:Feldstein LR; Mariat S; Gacic-Dobo M; Diallo MS; Conklin LM; Wallace AS
[Ti] Title:Global Routine Vaccination Coverage, 2016.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;66(45):1252-1255, 2017 Nov 17.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Global Vaccine Action Plan 2011-2020 (GVAP) (1), endorsed by the World Health Assembly in 2012, calls on all countries to reach ≥90% national coverage for all vaccines in the country's routine immunization schedule by 2020. CDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) evaluated the WHO and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) global vaccination coverage estimates to describe changes in global and regional coverage as of 2016. Global coverage estimates for the third dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis-containing vaccine (DTP3), the third dose of polio vaccine, and the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) have ranged from 84% to 86% since 2010. The dropout rate (the proportion of children who started but did not complete a vaccination series), an indicator of immunization program performance, was estimated to be 5% in 2016 for the 3-dose DTP series, with dropout highest in the African Region (11%) and lowest in the Western Pacific Region (0.4%). During 2010-2016, estimated global coverage with the second MCV dose (MCV2) increased from 21% to 46% by the end of the second year of life and from 39% to 64% when older age groups (3-14 years) were included (2). Improvements in national immunization program performance are necessary to reach and sustain high vaccination coverage to increase protection from vaccine-preventable diseases for all persons.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6645a3

  9 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29099909
[Au] Autor:Platt L; Thun M; Harriman K; Winter K
[Ad] Address:David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).
[Ti] Title:A Population-Based Study of Recurrent Symptomatic Bordetella pertussis Infections in Children in California, 2010-2015.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Natural infection with Bordetella pertussis is thought to result in 4-20 years of immunity against subsequent symptomatic pertussis infection. However, these estimates are based on studies in unvaccinated or whole-cell pertussis-vaccinated children. We conducted a population-based study of pertussis infection and reinfection during a 5-year period in California in an cohort vaccinated exclusively with acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. Methods: California surveillance data were reviewed to identify all children with 2 reported incidents of pertussis with symptom onset between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2015. Case investigation reports were reviewed, and children with ≥2 episodes of symptomatic pertussis infection that met the case definition were included. Results: Of 26259 pertussis cases reported in children (aged <18 years), 27 children met the inclusion criteria. Recurrent cases occurred among children of all ages; 5 (19%) were <6 months of age at the time of their first illness. The time from initial infection to reinfection was <1 year in 11 (41%) cases. Twenty-one children (78%) had received ≥3 doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and aP vaccine at the time of their first pertussis infection, 1 (4%) had received 1 dose, and 5 (19%) were unvaccinated. Conclusions: Recurrent cases of pertussis infection are extremely rare. Based on this surveillance data, approximately 0.1% of children who were infected with pertussis experienced a clinically significant second episode of pertussis within 4 years. More research is needed to understand the immune response to B. pertussis infection in children vaccinated with aP vaccines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix691

  10 / 1861 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29095807
[Au] Autor:Hill HA; Elam-Evans LD; Yankey D; Singleton JA; Kang Y
[Ad] Address:Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC.
[Ti] Title:Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months - United States, 2016.
[So] Source:MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep;66(43):1171-1177, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1545-861X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vaccination is the most effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases in young children (1). Data from the 2016 National Immunization Survey-Child (NIS-Child) were used to assess coverage with recommended vaccines (2) among children aged 19-35 months in the United States. Coverage remained ≥90% for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (91.9%), ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.1%), ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (90.6%), and ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (90.5%). Coverage in 2016 was approximately 1-2 percentage points lower than in 2015 for ≥3 doses of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP), ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine, the primary Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) series, ≥3 HepB doses, and ≥3 and ≥4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), with no changes for other vaccines. More direct evaluation of trends by month and year of birth (3) found no change in coverage by age 2 years among children included in combined data from the 2015 and 2016 NIS-Child (born January 2012 through January 2015). The observed decreases in annual estimates might result from random differences in vaccination coverage by age 19 months between children sampled in 2016 and those sampled in 2015, among those birth cohorts eligible to be sampled in both survey years. For most vaccines, 2016 coverage was lower among non-Hispanic black* (black) children than among non-Hispanic white (white) children, and for children living below the federal poverty level compared with those living at or above the poverty level. Vaccination coverage was generally lower among children insured by Medicaid (2.5-12.0 percentage points), and was much lower among uninsured children (12.4-24.9 percentage points), than among children with private insurance. The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was designed to increase access to vaccines among children who might not otherwise be vaccinated because of inability to pay. Greater awareness and facilitating use of VFC might be helpful in reducing these disparities. Efforts should also be focused on minimizing breaks in continuity of health insurance and eliminating missed opportunities to vaccinate children during visits to health care providers. Despite the observed disparities and small changes in coverage from 2015, vaccination coverage among children aged 19-35 months remained high and stable in 2016.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Vaccination/utilization
Vaccines/administration & dosage
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child, Preschool
Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Insurance, Health/statistics & numerical data
Poverty/statistics & numerical data
United States
Vaccination/trends
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171108
[Lr] Last revision date:171108
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171103
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.15585/mmwr.mm6643a3


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