Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29328498
[Au] Autor:Li YQ; Li CJ; Lv L; Cao QQ; Qian X; Li SW; Wang H; Zhao L
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:A UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of five flavonoids from Stellera chamaejasme L. in rat plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.
[So] Source:Biomed Chromatogr;, 2018 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:1099-0801
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stellera chamaejasme L. has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of scabies, tinea, stubborn skin ulcers, chronic tracheitis, cancer and tuberculosis. A sensitive and selective ultra-high liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of five flavonoids (stelleranol, chamaechromone, neochamaejasmin A, chamaejasmine and isochamaejasmin) of S. chamaejasme L. in rat plasma. Chromatographic separation was accomplished on an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C column (2.1 × 100 mm, 2.7 µm) with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min and the total analysis time was 7 min. The analytes were detected using multiple reaction monitoring in positive ionization mode. The samples were prepared by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The UPLC-MS/MS method was validated for specificity, linearity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision, recovery, matrix effect and stability. The validated method exhibited good linearity (r ≥ 0.9956), and the lower limits of quantification ranged from 0.51 to 0.64 ng/mL for five flavonoids. The intra- and inter-day precision were both <10.2%, and the accuracy ranged from -11.79 to 9.21%. This method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of five flavonoids in rats after oral administration of ethyl acetate extract of S. chamaejasme L.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/bmc.4189

  2 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29329683
[Au] Autor:Hoon-Hanks LL; Layton ML; Ossiboff RJ; Parker JSL; Dubovi EJ; Stenglein MD
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA. Electronic address: laura.hoon-hanks@colostate.edu.
[Ti] Title:Respiratory disease in ball pythons (Python regius) experimentally infected with ball python nidovirus.
[So] Source:Virology;, 2018 Jan 09.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0341
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Circumstantial evidence has linked a new group of nidoviruses with respiratory disease in pythons, lizards, and cattle. We conducted experimental infections in ball pythons (Python regius) to test the hypothesis that ball python nidovirus (BPNV) infection results in respiratory disease. Three ball pythons were inoculated orally and intratracheally with cell culture isolated BPNV and two were sham inoculated. Antemortem choanal, oroesophageal, and cloacal swabs and postmortem tissues of infected snakes were positive for viral RNA, protein, and infectious virus by qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, western blot and virus isolation. Clinical signs included oral mucosal reddening, abundant mucus secretions, open-mouthed breathing, and anorexia. Histologic lesions included chronic-active mucinous rhinitis, stomatitis, tracheitis, esophagitis and proliferative interstitial pneumonia. Control snakes remained negative and free of clinical signs throughout the experiment. Our findings establish a causal relationship between nidovirus infection and respiratory disease in ball pythons and shed light on disease progression and transmission.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180113
[Lr] Last revision date:180113
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29327961
[Au] Autor:Ludwig C; Lueders I; Schmidt V; Kempf H
[Ti] Title:Tracheal Resection in a Secretary Bird ( Sagittarius serpentarius) with Granulomatous, Foreign-body Induced Tracheitis.
[So] Source:J Avian Med Surg;31(4):308-313, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1082-6742
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 24-year-old female secretary bird ( Sagittarius serpentarius) was presented with acute, mild dyspnea occurring only during feeding times. Despite initial conservative therapy consisting of antibiotics and antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-inflammatory drugs, the dyspnea worsened progressively, resulting in severe respiratory distress. Radiographs of the trachea suggested stenosis in the caudal one-third of the trachea. Tracheal endoscopy revealed an obstruction of approximately 90% of the tracheal lumen, in addition to mild suspected aspergillosis of the air sacs. Tracheal resection and anastomosis were performed, during which 1.5 cm of abnormal trachea was removed. Histopathologic examination showed severe granulomatous tracheitis, most likely induced by foreign body material. Respiratory signs resolved immediately postoperatively. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapy continued for another 7 days and the bird was treated with antifungals for a total of 45 days. The bird recovered uneventfully. We encourage tracheal resection and anastomosis for severe tracheal stenosis even in aged, large birds of prey that are managed in large aviaries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1647/2016-223

  4 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29062196
[Au] Autor:Etriwati; Ratih D; Handharyani E; Setiyaningsih S
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia.
[Ti] Title:Pathology and immunohistochemistry study of Newcastle disease field case in chicken in Indonesia.
[So] Source:Vet World;10(9):1066-1071, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0972-8988
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The aim of the study was to examine pathology and the distribution pattern of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in internal organs of chickens from a field case using immunohistochemical staining. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 10 groups of broiler, layer, and domestic chicken were collected from necropsy room Division of Pathology, Bogor Agricultural University. These chickens were originated from West Java and collected based on pathologist diagnosis as suspect of Newcastle disease (ND). They were subsequently confirmed positive of ND with real-time-reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. The respiratory, circulatory, digestive, lymphoreticular and central nervous systems were collected for histopathology examination. RESULTS: The gross pathology and histopathology changes were tracheitis, pneumonia, pericarditis, myocarditis, catarrhal proventriculitis, catarrhal enteritis, typhlitis, perihepatitis, pancreatitis, nephritis interstitial, splenitis, atrophy of Bursa Fabricius, and encephalitis. CONCLUSION: The distribution pattern of NDV in internal organs of chickens from a field case in this study is similar with a previous reported pattern in systemic cases of the internal chicken organs. High intensity of immunohistochemistry stain result was detected in trachea, lung, proventriculus, duodenum, cecal tonsil, kidney, and brain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.14202/vetworld.2017.1066-1071

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[PMID]: 28839297
[Au] Autor:Choudhry S; Ahmad E; Batool A; Raja N
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics,Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Use of colistin for the treatment of multi drug resistant isolates in neonates.
[So] Source:J Pak Med Assoc;67(8):1157-1160, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0030-9982
[Cp] Country of publication:Pakistan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of using colistin for multidrug-resistant organisms in neonates. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at the Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, and comprised microbiological data of babies from January 2010 to October 2012.The data was reviewed to identify the babies infected with multidrug-resistant organisms and who had received colistin therapy. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. RESULTS: Of the 30 neonates, 24(80%) were males and 6(20%) were females. Besides, 16(53.3%) neonates were preterm babies (< 37 weeks gestation). Two or more risk factors for multidrug-resistant organisms were present in 13(44%) babies. Mechanical ventilation was found in 26(87%) neonates and prior prolonged use of antibiotics in 7(23%). The commonest pathogen isolated was Acinetobacter, in 22(73%) cases. All isolates were susceptible to colistin but pan-resistant to multiple antibiotics, including cephalosporins, amikacin, meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Colistin therapy was used for bacteraemia in 2(7%) cases, clinical sepsis 18(60%), pneumonia 2(7%) and tracheitis 8(26.7%). Moreover, 15(50%) neonates received both intravenous and aerosolised colistin while 9(30%) received aerosolised therapy alone. CONCLUSIONS: Colistin therapy was well tolerated in neonates for the treatment of multidrug-resistant organisms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170825
[Lr] Last revision date:170825
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28793356
[Au] Autor:Wang F; Zhong H; Fang S; Zheng Y; Li C; Peng G; Shen X
[Ad] Address:School of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, P. R. China.
[Ti] Title:Potential Anti-inflammatory Sesquiterpene Lactones from Eupatorium lindleyanum.
[So] Source:Planta Med;, 2017 Aug 09.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0221
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:has traditionally been used as folk medicine in Asian countries for its therapeutic effects on tracheitis and tonsillitis. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory active constituents from led to the isolation of two novel sesquiterpene lactones, named eupalinolide L ( ) and eupalinolide M ( ), and seven known sesquiterpene lactones ( - ). The structures and configurations of the new compounds were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, especially 2D NMR techniques. experiments showed that the sesquiterpenes fraction significantly reduced mouse ear edema induced by xylene (18.6%, p < 0.05). In assays, compounds - showed excellent anti-inflammatory activities, as they lowered TNF- and IL-6 levels in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells (p < 0.001). The above results suggest that the sesquiterpene lactones from can be developed as novel potential natural anti-inflammatory agents.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170809
[Lr] Last revision date:170809
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0043-117742

  7 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28770319
[Au] Autor:Lönnrot M; Lynch KF; Elding Larsson H; Lernmark Å; Rewers MJ; Törn C; Burkhardt BR; Briese T; Hagopian WA; She JX; Simell OG; Toppari J; Ziegler AG; Akolkar B; Krischer JP; Hyöty H; TEDDY Study Group
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Tampere University Hospital, Teiskontie 35, 33521, Tampere, Finland. maria.lonnrot@uta.fi.
[Ti] Title:Respiratory infections are temporally associated with initiation of type 1 diabetes autoimmunity: the TEDDY study.
[So] Source:Diabetologia;60(10):1931-1940, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0428
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Respiratory infections and onset of islet autoimmunity are reported to correlate positively in two small prospective studies. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study is the largest prospective international cohort study on the environmental determinants of type 1 diabetes that regularly monitors both clinical infections and islet autoantibodies. The aim was to confirm the influence of reported respiratory infections and to further characterise the temporal relationship with autoantibody seroconversion. METHODS: During the years 2004-2009, 8676 newborn babies with HLA genotypes conferring an increased risk of type 1 diabetes were enrolled at 3 months of age to participate in a 15 year follow-up. In the present study, the association between parent-reported respiratory infections and islet autoantibodies at 3 month intervals up to 4 years of age was evaluated in 7869 children. Time-dependent proportional hazard models were used to assess how the timing of respiratory infections related to persistent confirmed islet autoimmunity, defined as autoantibody positivity against insulin, GAD and/or insulinoma antigen-2, concordant at two reference laboratories on two or more consecutive visits. RESULTS: In total, 87,327 parent-reported respiratory infectious episodes were recorded while the children were under study surveillance for islet autoimmunity, and 454 children seroconverted. The number of respiratory infections occurring in a 9 month period was associated with the subsequent risk of autoimmunity (p < 0.001). For each 1/year rate increase in infections, the hazard of islet autoimmunity increased by 5.6% (95% CI 2.5%, 8.8%). The risk association was linked primarily to infections occurring in the winter (HR 1.42 [95% CI 1.16, 1.74]; p < 0.001). The types of respiratory infection independently associated with autoimmunity were common cold, influenza-like illness, sinusitis, and laryngitis/tracheitis, with HRs (95% CI) of 1.38 (1.11, 1.71), 2.37 (1.35, 4.15), 2.63 (1.22, 5.67) and 1.76 (1.04, 2.98), respectively. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Recent respiratory infections in young children correlate with an increased risk of islet autoimmunity in the TEDDY study. Further studies to identify the potential causative viruses with pathogen-specific assays should focus especially on the 9 month time window leading to autoantibody seroconversion.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171124
[Lr] Last revision date:171124
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00125-017-4365-5

  8 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28757125
[Au] Autor:Blot M; Bonniaud-Blot P; Favrolt N; Bonniaud P; Chavanet P; Piroth L
[Ad] Address:Département de maladies infectieuses, CHU, 21000 Dijon, France; Inserm, LNC UMR866, 21000 Dijon, France. Electronic address: mathieu.blot@chu-dijon.fr.
[Ti] Title:Update on childhood and adult infectious tracheitis.
[So] Source:Med Mal Infect;47(7):443-452, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1769-6690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The trachea is a pivotal organ of the respiratory tract. Rather than a genuine anatomic border, it acts as a crossroad in all respiratory infectious processes. Even though not strictly limited to the trachea, infections such as laryngotracheitis and tracheobronchitis are frequently diagnosed in children, in particular during the winter season. Infectious tracheitis etiologies are diverse and the distinction between viral and bacterial origins, albeit difficult, remains relevant considering the substantial differences in terms of gravity and therapeutic management. This literature review summarizes the microbiological and clinical aspects of community-acquired and nosocomial tracheitis in adults and children, as well as the adequate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. It also highlights the emergence of fungal tracheitis in immunocompromised patients, of ventilator-associated tracheitis in intensive care medicine, and beyond all that the potential short and long-term consequences of tracheitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171022
[Lr] Last revision date:171022
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28738337
[Au] Autor:Yaremchuk K; Garcia-Rodriguez L
[Ti] Title:The History of Sleep Surgery.
[So] Source:Adv Otorhinolaryngol;80:17-21, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1662-2847
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Snoring and the subsequent diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was a life-threatening medical condition with no available treatment until the late 20th century. An early description of OSA was provided by Charles Dickens in his 1836 novel Pickwick Papers with the description of a "fat boy" who was thought to be lazy and always falling asleep but likely displayed hypersomnolence from OSA. It was not until 1976 that Ikematsu first described uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) as an alternative surgical treatment of "snoring," with a reported cure rate of 81%. The only other surgical procedure for OSA was permanent tracheostomy, but patients suffered from social stigma from the visible stoma with skin flaps and complications such as tracheal granulomas and tracheitis. UPPP was introduced in the USA as an alternative to permanent tracheostomy by Fujita in 1981. Since then, multiple surgical approaches and combinations of approaches have surfaced, with variable success rates.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/history
Snoring/history
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: History, 20th Century
Humans
Pharynx/surgery
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/surgery
Snoring/surgery
Tracheostomy/history
Uvula/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171023
[Lr] Last revision date:171023
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170725
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000470683

  10 / 1614 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28692924
[Au] Autor:Hassan KE; Ali A; Shany SAS; El-Kady MF
[Ad] Address:Department of Poultry Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Experimental co-infection of infectious bronchitis and low pathogenic avian influenza H9N2 viruses in commercial broiler chickens.
[So] Source:Res Vet Sci;115:356-362, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2661
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this study, commercial broilers were experimentally infected with single (classical IBV, variant IBV or AIV-H9N2) or mixed AIV-H9N2 with classical, variant or vaccine strains of IBV. Birds were monitored for clinical and pathological outcomes and virus shedding for 10days post infection (DPI). Clinical signs were limited to the respiratory tract in all challenged groups and varied from mild to moderate mouth breathing to severe respiratory signs with snorting sound and extended head. Mortalities were only recorded in mixed AIV-H9N2/variant IBV challenge group. AIV-H9N2 challenge caused tracheal petechial hemorrhage that progressed to tracheal congestion and caseation. In mixed AIV-H9N2/IBV vaccine challenge, severe tracheitis with bronchial cast formation was observed. In mixed AIV-H9N2/variant IBV challenge severe congestion of the tracheal mucosa and excessive exudates with a tendency to form tubular casts were observed. Kidney ureate deposition was only observed in variant IBV challenge group. Histopathologically, tracheal congestion, severe degeneration, and deciliation were noticed in all groups of mixed infection. Interestingly, hemorrhage and atrophy were observed in thymus gland of birds challenged with single AIV-H9N2 or mixed AIV-H9N2/IBV. There was no difference in the tracheal shedding level of variant IBV between single and mixed infected groups while classical IBV shedding increased in mixed infection group. Interestingly, the AIV-H9N2 showed constantly high shedding titers till 7DPI with variant or vaccine IBV co-infection. In conclusion, co-infection of IBV and AIV-H9N2 induced severe clinical outcome and high mortality. Also, IBV co-infection increased the shedding of AIV-H9N2 in experimentally infected birds.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:In-Process


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