Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Trichomonas and Vaginitis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29391293
[Au] Autor:Salakos E; Korb D; Morin C; Sibony O
[Ad] Address:Department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Robert-Debre hospital, 48, boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France. Electronic address: e.salakos@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A case of non-treated Trichomonas vaginalis infection and severe preterm labor with positive obstetrical outcome.
[So] Source:J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:2468-7847
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trichomonas vaginalis is a very common, sexually transmitted, infection that may sometimes be asymptomatic or cause vaginitis and urethritis. Recently, it has been associated with adverse obstetric outcomes such as preterm delivery, low birth weight and premature rupture of membranes. Trichomonas vaginalis can be vertically transmitted at birth. It has been found in pharynx and low respiratory tract of neonates with respiratory disease. It has also been involved in some cases of intellectual disability. The recommended treatment is a 2g metronidazole oral single dose, even for asymptomatic patients. This treatment is effective against Trichomonas and its use is safe during pregnancy. We report here a case of Trichomonas vaginalis infection diagnosed during pregnancy in a patient with severe preterm labor. The patient being allergic to nitroimidazole antibiotics, she did not receive any treatment. She finally gave birth at 34 weeks of gestation (WG) and 5 days, with no other adverse outcome than small prematurity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29396352
[Au] Autor:Feng RM; Z Wang M; Smith JS; Dong L; Chen F; Pan QJ; Zhang X; Qiao YL; Zhao FH
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology, National Cancer Center, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS) & Peking Union Medical College (PUMC), Beijing, China; Department of Cancer Prevention center, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China; State Key Laboratory of Oncology
[Ti] Title:Risk of high-risk human papillomavirus infection and cervical precancerous lesions with past or current trichomonas infection: a pooled analysis of 25,054 women in rural China.
[So] Source:J Clin Virol;99-100:84-90, 2018 Feb - Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5967
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Trichomonas vaginitis (TV) infection has obviously been implicated in gynecological morbidity but still unclear in cervical lesions. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of hr-HPV infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2 + ) by TV infection. STUDY DESIGN: The pooled study was conducted among 12 population-based, cervical cancer screening studies throughout China (N = 24,054). HPV was detected by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) test. Past TV infection was measured by self-reporting, current TV infection was diagnosed by liquid-based cytology (LBC), cervical lesions was diagnosed by histopathology. RESULTS: Respective prevalence of hr-HPV and CIN2+ were 17.4% and 3.3%. Out of 24,054 women, 14.6% reported past TV infection, and out of 11,853 women, 9.9% had current TV infection. Current TV-positive women had an increased risk for hr-HPV (OR 1.31, 95%CI: 1.11-1.56). The risk of CIN2+ decreased for hr-HPV positive women with current TV infection (adjusted OR 0.50, 95% CI: 0.30-0.84) and past TV infection (adjusted OR 0.68, 95% CI: 0.54-0.86). Among hr-HPV negative women, no significant associations were observed between past or current TV infection and risk of CIN2+. CONCLUSIONS: Women infected with HPV are more likely to be infected by other types of sexually transmitted diseases. Current TV-positive women had an increased risk for hr-HPV infection compared to currently TV-negative women. Both past and current TV-positive women had a decreased risk for CIN2+, especially among high-risk HPV positive women. More direct investigation into the interaction between TV, HPV, inflammatory signals, and risk of carcinogenesis are further needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29017160
[Au] Autor:Donders GGG; Ravel J; Vitali B; Netea MG; Salumets A; Unemo M
[Ti] Title:Role of Molecular Biology in Diagnosis and Characterization of Vulvo-Vaginitis in Clinical Practice.
[So] Source:Gynecol Obstet Invest;, 2017 Oct 10.
[Is] ISSN:1423-002X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The diagnosis of vulvo-vaginal complaints has always been enigmatic in obstetrics and gynecology. Patients with clear, pathognomonic symptoms end up with a proper diagnosis and treatment most of the time, but unfortunately we are now living in a world where women reach out to the Internet and readily get all information as to which disease their symptoms correspond to and also find the appropriate treatment "over-the-counter." Because of this trend, we as specialists are increasingly confronted with patients with complex and combined conditions. At the same time, extremely sensitive and accurate diagnostic tools are now being developed at a rapid pace, allowing the physicians to diagnose vulvo-vaginal disease with a substantially increased precision. Moreover, many of these molecular biology (MB)-based tests have become so common and affordable that self-sampling and self-testing are no longer utopia. On the other hand, too much information that is too readily available and that is too affordable also encompasses pitfalls, leading to gross overtreatment and psychological burden. As experienced caregivers, we should supervise these evolutions, define their place and proper use as diagnostic tools, utilize their potential as ad hoc tools to follow-up treatment efficacy and guide how such tools can be used for responsible self-testing. In the present paper, responding to the need for appropriate, quality assured and accessible tests for vulvo-vaginitis and the huge potential delivered by the rapidly developing MB methods, we recommend the need for a broad and regular discussion forum, composed of both clinical and technical experts and opinion makers, in order to match the needs with the huge opportunities and ideally combine the initiatives and forces into the same direction. This forum should then translate conceived strategies into regularly updated, evidence-based national and international guidelines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171010
[Lr] Last revision date:171010
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000478982

  4 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28972465
[Au] Autor:Carrillo-Ávila JA; Serrano-García ML; Fernández-Parra J; Sorlózano-Puerto A; Navarro-Marí JM; Stensvold CR; Gutiérrez-Fernández J
[Ad] Address:1​Biobank of the Andalusian Public Health System (BBSSPA), Granada, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and genetic diversity of Trichomonas vaginalis in the general population of Granada and co-infections with Gardnerella vaginalis and Candida species.
[So] Source:J Med Microbiol;66(10):1436-1442, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1473-5644
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Purulent or exudative genitourinary infections are a frequent cause of consultation in primary and specialized healthcare. The objectives of this study were: to determine the prevalence of Trichomonas vaginalis and co-infections with Candida spp. and Gardnerella vaginalis in vaginal secretion; and to use multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to analyse the genetic diversity of T. vaginalis strains. METHODOLOGY: The samples were submitted for analysis (n=5230) to a third-level hospital in Granada (Southern Spain) between 2011 and 2014; eight T. vaginalis strains isolated during 2015 were randomly selected for MLST analysis. Culture and nucleic acid hybridization techniques were used to detect microorganisms in the samples. RESULTS: The prevalence of T. vaginalis was 2.4 % between 2011 and 2014, being higher during the first few months of both 2011 and 2012. Among samples positive for T. vaginalis, co-infection with G. vaginalis was detected in 29 samples and co-infection with Candida spp. in 6, while co-infection with all three pathogens was observed in 3 samples. The only statistically significant between-year difference in co-infection rates was observed for T. vaginalis with G. vaginalis due to an elevated rate in 2011. MLST analysis results demonstrated a high genetic variability among strains circulating in our setting. CONCLUSION: These findings emphasize the need for the routine application of diagnostic procedures to avoid the spread of this sexually transmitted infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Candida/classification
Candidiasis/complications
Gardnerella vaginalis/isolation & purification
Genetic Variation
Trichomonas Infections/microbiology
Trichomonas vaginalis/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Candidiasis/epidemiology
Coinfection/epidemiology
Coinfection/microbiology
Coinfection/parasitology
Female
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/complications
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/epidemiology
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/microbiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Spain/epidemiology
Trichomonas Infections/complications
Trichomonas Infections/epidemiology
Vaginal Diseases/epidemiology
Vaginal Diseases/microbiology
Vaginal Diseases/parasitology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171004
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/jmm.0.000603

  5 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28935536
[Au] Autor:Elwakil HS; Tawfik RA; Alam-Eldin YH; Nassar DA
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:The effect of iron on metronidazole activity against Trichomonas vaginalis in vitro.
[So] Source:Exp Parasitol;182:34-36, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2449
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Metronidazole is administered in an inactive form then activated to its cytotoxic form within the hydrogenosome of trichomonads. Two hydrogenosomal proteins, pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and ferredoxin, play a critical role in the reductive activation of metronidazole. The expression of these proteins and other hydrogenosomal proteins are likewise positively regulated by iron. In the present study, the effect of iron on minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of metronidazole on in vitro cultured Trichomonas vaginalis(T. vaginalis) isolates was investigated. Interestingly, Addition of Ferrous ammonium sulphate (FAS) to T. vaginalis culture led to decrease in the MLC of metronidazole. On using aerobic assay, MLC of metronidazole on untreated T. vaginalis of both isolates was 12.5 µg/ml that decreased to 0.38 µg/ml on FAS treated trichomonads. Also anaerobic assay revealed that MLC on untreated parasites was 3.12 µg/ml that decreased to 0.097 µg/ml and 0.19 µg/ml for isolate 1 and isolate 2 respectively after iron addition. It was concluded that, addition of iron to in vitro cultured T. vaginalis decreases metronidazole MLC that was detected by both aerobic and anaerobic assays.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiprotozoal Agents/pharmacology
Iron/pharmacology
Metronidazole/pharmacology
Trichomonas Vaginitis/parasitology
Trichomonas vaginalis/drug effects
Vaginal Discharge/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aerobiosis
Anaerobiosis
Antiprotozoal Agents/metabolism
Drug Interactions
Female
Ferredoxins/metabolism
Ferrous Compounds/pharmacology
Humans
Lethal Dose 50
Metronidazole/metabolism
Oxidation-Reduction
Pyruvate Synthase/metabolism
Quaternary Ammonium Compounds/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiprotozoal Agents); 0 (Ferredoxins); 0 (Ferrous Compounds); 0 (Quaternary Ammonium Compounds); 140QMO216E (Metronidazole); 9Q764AYJ9G (ammonium ferrous sulfate); E1UOL152H7 (Iron); EC 1.2.7.1 (Pyruvate Synthase)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170923
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28849960
[Au] Autor:Rezk M; Sayyed T; Masood A; Dawood R
[Ad] Address:a Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine , Menoufia University , Shibin El Kom , Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Risk of bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans infection among new users of combined hormonal contraception vs LNG-IUS.
[So] Source:Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care;:1-5, 2017 Aug 29.
[Is] ISSN:1473-0782
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The study assessed the risk of bacterial vaginosis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Candida albicans infection among new users of either a combined oral contraceptive pill (COC) or the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). METHODS: This prospective observational study included 430 women, without active vaginitis at inclusion, who were divided into two groups according to their chosen method of contraception: COC group (n = 236) and LNG-IUS group (n = 194). Participants were examined for bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis and C. albicans infection initially and then at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months after the start of contraceptive use. Data were collected and statistically analysed. RESULTS: The rates of acquisition of bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis and C. albicans infection during follow-up were significantly increased and comparable between the groups (p < .001) and decreased in frequency over time (p < .05). The rates of acquisition of bacterial vaginosis among COC users (Nugent score) were 24.6, 18.6 and 15.2% and among LNG-IUS users 20.6, 13.5 and 9.3% at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months, respectively (p < .001). Body mass index >25 kg/m , history of bacterial vaginosis, history of sexually transmitted infection, vaginal douching more than five times per week and coital frequency more than five times per week were strong risk factors for acquisition of bacterial vaginosis during the follow-up period (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The use of COCs and LNG-IUS is associated with an increased, comparable risk of acquisition of bacterial vaginosis, T. vaginalis and C. albicans infections, which is greatest during initial use of the method but which improves over time.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170829
[Lr] Last revision date:170829
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/13625187.2017.1365835

  7 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28702014
[Au] Autor:Ioannidis A; Papaioannou P; Magiorkinis E; Magana M; Ioannidou V; Tzanetou K; Burriel AR; Tsironi M; Chatzipanagiotou S
[Ad] Address:Department of Nursing, Faculty of Human Movement and Quality of Life Sciences, University of PeloponneseSparta, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Detecting the Diversity of and Endosymbionts Hosted by Isolates.
[So] Source:Front Microbiol;8:1188, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1664-302X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The symbiosis of and is the first described association between two obligate human parasites. is the niche and the vector for the transmission of infection. This clinically significant symbiosis may affect virulence and susceptibility to treatment. The aims of this study were to investigate the intracellularly present and species in strains isolated from the vaginal discharge of infected women as well as to trace the diversity pattern among the species detected in the isolated strains. Hundred pure cultures were isolated from ~7,500 patient specimens presented with clinical purulent vaginitis. PCR and sequencing for spp. were performed in DNA extracted from the pure cultures. In addition, vaginal discharge samples were cultured for the presence of and . Phylogenetic analysis assisted the identification of interspecies relationships between the and isolates. Fifty four percentage of isolates were harboring spp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three distinct clusters, two with already characterized and spp. (37% of total spp.), whereas one group formed a distinct cluster matched with the newly identified species (59.3%) and one or more unknown spp. (3.7%). strains associated with vaginal infection might host intracellular mycoplasmas or ureaplasmas. Intracellular Mollicutes that remain undetected in the extracellular environment when conventional diagnostic methods are implemented may comprise either novel species, such as , or unknown species with yet unexplored clinical significance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170716
[Lr] Last revision date:170716
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2017.01188

  8 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28683790
[Au] Autor:Nabweyambo S; Kakaire O; Sowinski S; Okeng A; Ojiambo H; Kimeze J; Najjingo I; Bwanga F
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Microbiology, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda.
[Ti] Title:Very low sensitivity of wet mount microscopy compared to PCR against culture in the diagnosis of vaginal trichomoniasis in Uganda: a cross sectional study.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;10(1):259, 2017 Jul 06.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) causes the Trichomoniasis Syndrome composed of vaginitis in women, urethritis in men and tube infection in both sexes. This infection is strongly associated with premature rupture of membranes, preterm delivery, low birth weight, promoting HIV sexual transmission and infertility. Prevention of these complications requires accurate early detection and effective treatment of infected individuals. In the resource limited settings, the wet mount microscopy (WMM) is often the only available test for laboratory detection of TV, but its accuracy and that of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tools in Uganda remain poorly studied. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the WMM and PCR against culture as reference standard for the direct diagnosis of TV among symptomatic women. Three high vaginal swabs were collected from each of one hundred fifty women presenting with symptoms suggestive of active vaginal trichomoniasis at the sexually transmitted diseases clinic of Mulago National Referral Hospital Kampala, Uganda. The swabs were tested for TV with WMM, in-house PCR and TV culture. Results were analysed using excel 2007, SPSS v16, and Meta-disc software to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the tests. RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity and kappa agreement of the WMM was 25% (95% CI 5.5-57.2%), 100% (95% CI 97-100) and 0.38, respectively. Corresponding values for the PCR were 91.7% (95% CI 61.5-99.8), 99.3% (95% CI 96-100) and 0.91, respectively. CONCLUSION: Among the TV symptomatic women, the sensitivity of the WMM was very low, with two-thirds of the patients missing a diagnosis while the in-house PCR was highly sensitive and specific. Feasibility studies aimed at incorporating PCR tools in algorithms for diagnosis of TV infection in resource-limited settings are recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13104-017-2581-1

  9 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28617786
[Au] Autor:Bissessor L; Wilson J; McAuliffe G; Upton A
[Ad] Address:Microbiology, Labtests, Auckland.
[Ti] Title:Audit of Trichomonas vaginalis test requesting by community referrers after a change from culture to molecular testing, including a cost analysis.
[So] Source:N Z Med J;130(1457):34-37, 2017 Jun 16.
[Is] ISSN:1175-8716
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) prevalence varies among different communities and peoples. The availability of robust molecular platforms for the detection of TV has advanced diagnosis; however, molecular tests are more costly than phenotypic methodologies, and testing all urogenital samples is costly. We recently replaced culture methods with the Aptima Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid amplification test on specific request and as reflex testing by the laboratory, and have audited this change. METHODS: Data were collected from August 2015 (microbroth culture and microscopy) and August 2016 (Aptima TV assay) including referrer, testing volumes, results and test cost estimates. RESULTS: In August 2015, 10,299 vaginal swabs, and in August 2016, 2,189 specimens (urogenital swabs and urines), were tested. The positivity rate went from 0.9% to 5.3%, and overall more TV infections were detected in 2016. The number needed to test and cost for one positive TV result respectively was 111 and $902.55 in 2015, and 19 and $368.92 in 2016. Request volumes and positivity rates differed among referrers. CONCLUSIONS: The methodology change was associated with higher overall detection of TV, and reductions in the numbers needed to test/cost for one TV diagnosis. Our audit suggests that there is room for improvement with TV test requesting in our community.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Clinical Audit
Mass Screening/methods
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/economics
Trichomonas Vaginitis/diagnosis
Trichomonas Vaginitis/epidemiology
Trichomonas vaginalis/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
New Zealand/epidemiology
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods
Sensitivity and Specificity
Specimen Handling
Trichomonas vaginalis/genetics
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170720
[Lr] Last revision date:170720
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170616
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 3138 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28612378
[Au] Autor:Serwin AB; Bulhak-Koziol V; Sokolowska M; Golparian D; Unemo M
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Trichomonas vaginalis is very rare among women with vaginal discharge in Podlaskie province, Poland.
[So] Source:APMIS;125(9):840-843, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0463
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common curable sexually transmitted pathogen globally. However, in the European Union (EU), trichomoniasis appears to be a rare condition. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of T. vaginalis among females attending an STI centre in Bialystok, Poland, using the highly sensitive and specific APTIMA T. vaginalis assay. Consecutive females, referred by gynaecologists mainly because of abnormal vaginal discharge, were diagnosed using wet mount microscopy, culture and APTIMA T. vaginalis assay. Among 272 women studied, 82% were pre- and 18% postmenopausal. The average age was 36.0 ± 13.9 (range: 18-86) years. Abnormal discharge (alone or accompanied by itch or vulvovaginal burning) was the most frequent complain in both groups (66.2% and 48.0%). Erythema and discharge were the most frequent abnormal signs (58.6% and 56.0%). Not a single T. vaginalis-positive sample was detected using wet mount microscopy, culture or APTIMA T. vaginalis assay. Despite using the highly sensitive APTIMA T. vaginalis assay for detection, the pathogen could not be identified in females in the studied setting, similar to results from other EU settings. The need for general screening using NAAT for this pathogen while diagnosing vulvovaginal symptoms in females in Poland appears to be low.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/methods
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/methods
Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis
Trichomonas Vaginitis/diagnosis
Trichomonas Vaginitis/epidemiology
Trichomonas vaginalis/genetics
Vaginal Discharge/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Microscopy/methods
Middle Aged
Poland/epidemiology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases/parasitology
Trichomonas vaginalis/isolation & purification
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170907
[Lr] Last revision date:170907
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170615
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/apm.12713


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