Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Trigeminal and Nerve and Injuries [Words]
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[PMID]: 29523381
[Au] Autor:Klazen Y; Van der Cruyssen F; Vranckx M; Van Vlierberghe M; Politis C; Renton T; Jacobs R
[Ad] Address:OMFS-IMPATH Research Group, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Iatrogenic trigeminal post-traumatic neuropathy: a retrospective two-year cohort study.
[So] Source:Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1399-0020
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:With the growing demand for dental work, trigeminal nerve injuries are increasingly common. This retrospective cohort study examined 53 cases of iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injury seen at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals of Leuven between 2013 and 2014 (0.6% among 8845 new patient visits). Patient records were screened for post-traumatic trigeminal nerve neuropathy caused by nerve injury incurred during implant surgery, endodontic treatment, local anaesthesia, tooth extraction, or specifically third molar removal. The patients ranged in age from 15 to 80years (mean age 42.1years) and 68% were female. The referral delay ranged from 1day to 6.5years (average 10months). The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) was most frequently injured (28 cases), followed by the lingual nerve (LN) (21 cases). Most nerve injuries were caused during third molar removal (24 cases), followed by implant placement (nine cases) and local anaesthesia injuries (nine cases). Pain symptoms were experienced by 54% of patients suffering IAN injury, compared to 10% of patients with LN injury. Persistent neurosensory disturbances were identified in 60% of patients. While prevention remains the key issue, timely referral seems to be a critical factor for the successful treatment of post-traumatic neuropathy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28468199
[Au] Autor:Cho SE; Shin HS; Tak MS; Kang SG; Lee YS; Kim HS; Kim CH
[Ad] Address:*Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul †Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:A Rare Complication of Infraorbital Nerve Hyperesthesia in Surgically Repaired Orbital Fracture Patients.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;28(3):e233-e234, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Injury to the peripheral sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve can follow a wide variety of craniofacial injuries. Many patients with facial fractures complain about the symptom of numbness to the distribution of injured nerve, which is indicative of hypoesthesia. Hyperesthesia involving the infraorbital nerve is rare in comparison to hypoesthesia secondary to facial trauma. The authors report on 2 patients with infraorbital nerve hyperesthesia in surgically repaired orbital fracture patients. Surgical decompression of the infraorbital nerve led to rapid resolution of hyperesthesia. To the best of our knowledge, these were rare cases of patients who presented with persistent hyperesthesia. Clinician should perform early surgical decompression of the infraorbital nerve in patient with persistent hyperesthesia of the infraorbital nerve.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hyperesthesia/etiology
Maxillary Nerve/injuries
Orbital Fractures/complications
Orbital Fractures/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Decompression, Surgical
Humans
Hyperesthesia/diagnosis
Hyperesthesia/surgery
Hypesthesia/etiology
Hypesthesia/surgery
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000003439

  3 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29303763
[Au] Autor:Giglio JA; Gregg JM
[Ti] Title:Development of mirror pain following trigeminal nerve injury: a case report and review of neuropathic mechanisms.
[So] Source:Gen Dent;66(1):27-32, 2018 Jan-Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0363-6771
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Following injury to a peripheral nerve, patients may complain of pain over the distribution of the same contralateral nerve, a phenomenon referred to as contralateral pain or mirror pain (MP). Symptoms of MP usually begin after the neuropathic pain from the original nerve injury has become chronic. Chronic neuropathic pain can lead to sensitization and spread of pain. Because the diagnosis of MP can be missed, patients may undergo multiple treatment procedures that prove to be ineffective in relieving the pain. This article presents a case of MP that appeared approximately 20 months following inferior alveolar nerve injury that occurred during placement of a dental implant in the region of the first molar. Acutely painful nerve injuries must be aggressively treated to prevent changeover to a chronic pain state characterized by sensitization and spread of pain beyond the initial injury. Consequently, clinicians need to begin effective, early pain management to prevent the changeover to chronic pain that has become centralized and refractive to treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180105
[Lr] Last revision date:180105
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29159152
[Au] Autor:Lee JM; Whang K; Cho SM; Kim JY; Oh JW; Koo YM; Hu C; Pyen J; Choi JW
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Cranial Nerve Palsy after Onyx Embolization as a Treatment for Cerebral Vascular Malformation.
[So] Source:J Cerebrovasc Endovasc Neurosurg;19(3):189-195, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2234-8565
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Onyx liquid embolic system is a relatively safe and commonly used treatment for vascular malformations, such as arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous malformations. However, studies on possible complications after Onyx embolization in patients with vascular malformations are limited, and the occurrence of cranial nerve palsy is occasionally reported. Here we report the progress of two different types of cranial nerve palsy that can occur after embolization. In both cases, Onyx embolization was performed to treat vascular malformations and ipsilateral oculomotor and facial nerve palsies were observed. Both patients were treated with steroids and exhibited symptom improvement after several months. The most common types of neuropathy that can occur after Onyx embolization are facial nerve palsy and trigeminal neuralgia. Although the mechanisms underlying these neuropathies are not clear, they may involve traction injuries sustained while extracting the microcatheter, mass effects resulting from thrombi and edema, or Onyx reflux into the vasa nervorum. In most cases, the neuropathy spontaneously resolves several months following the procedure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171123
[Lr] Last revision date:171123
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7461/jcen.2017.19.3.189

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[PMID]: 29146720
[Au] Autor:Dessouky R; Xi Y; Zuniga J; Chhabra A
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Radiology (R.D., Y.X., A.C.).
[Ti] Title:Role of MR Neurography for the Diagnosis of Peripheral Trigeminal Nerve Injuries in Patients with Prior Molar Tooth Extraction.
[So] Source:AJNR Am J Neuroradiol;, 2017 Nov 16.
[Is] ISSN:1936-959X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Clinical neurosensory testing is an imperfect reference standard to evaluate molar tooth extraction related peripheral trigeminal neuropathy. The purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MR neurography in this domain and correlation with neurosensory testing and surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, nerve caliber, T2 signal intensity ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratios were recorded by 2 observers using MR neurography for bilateral branches of the peripheral trigeminal nerve, the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves. Patient demographics and correlation of the MR neurography findings with the Sunderland classification of nerve injury and intraoperative findings of surgical patients were obtained. RESULTS: Among 42 patients, the mean ± SD age for case and control patients were 35.8 ± 10.2 years and 43.2 ± 11.5 years, respectively, with male-to-female ratios of 1:1.4 and 1:5, respectively. Case subjects (peripheral trigeminal neuropathy or injury) had significantly larger differences in nerve thickness, T2 signal intensity ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratios than control patients for the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve ( = .01 and .0001, .012 and .005, and .01 and .01, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a significant association among differences in nerve thickness, T2 signal intensity ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratios and nerve injury (area under the curve, 0.83-0.84 for the inferior alveolar nerve and 0.77-0.78 for the lingual nerve). Interobserver agreement was good for the inferior alveolar nerve (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.70-0.79) and good to excellent for the lingual nerve (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.75-0.85). MR neurography correlations with respect to clinical neurosensory testing and surgical classifications were moderate to good. Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.68 and 0.81 and κ of 0.60 and 0.77 were observed for differences in nerve thickness. CONCLUSIONS: MR neurography can be reliably used for the diagnosis of injuries to the peripheral trigeminal nerve related to molar tooth extractions, with good to excellent correlation of imaging with clinical findings and surgical results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171117
[Lr] Last revision date:171117
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3174/ajnr.A5438

  6 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29073666
[Au] Autor:López Chiriboga AS; Cheshire WP
[Ti] Title:Trigeminal Neuralgia Following Lightning Injury.
[So] Source:J Oral Facial Pain Headache;31(4):e7-e9, 2017 Fall.
[Is] ISSN:2333-0384
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lightning and other electrical incidents are responsible for more than 300 injuries and 100 deaths per year in the United States alone. Lightning strikes can cause a wide spectrum of neurologic manifestations affecting any part of the neuraxis through direct strikes, side flashes, touch voltage, connecting leaders, or acoustic shock waves. This article describes the first case of trigeminal neuralgia induced by lightning injury to the trigeminal nerve, thereby adding a new syndrome to the list of possible lightning-mediated neurologic injuries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171026
[Lr] Last revision date:171026
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11607/ofph.1871

  7 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28961964
[Au] Autor:Mahan MA; Sivakumar W; Weingarten D; Brown JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Neurosciences Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.
[Ti] Title:Deep Temporal Nerve Transfer for Facial Reanimation: Anatomic Dissections and Surgical Case Report.
[So] Source:Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown);, 2017 Sep 08.
[Is] ISSN:2332-4260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Facial nerve palsy is a disabling condition that may arise from a variety of injuries or insults and may occur at any point along the nerve or its intracerebral origin. OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of the deep temporal branches of the motor division of the trigeminal nerve for neural reconstruction of the temporal branches of the facial nerve for restoration of active blink and periorbital facial expression. METHODS: Formalin-fixed human cadaver hemifaces were dissected to identify landmarks for the deep temporal branches and the tension-free coaptation lengths. This technique was then utilized in 1 patient with a history of facial palsy due to a brainstem cavernoma. RESULTS: Sixteen hemifaces were dissected. The middle deep temporal nerve could be consistently identified on the deep side of the temporalis, within 9 to 12 mm posterior to the jugal point of the zygoma. From a lateral approach through the temporalis, the middle deep temporal nerve could be directly coapted to facial temporal branches in all specimens. Our patient has recovered active and independent upper facial muscle contraction, providing the first case report of a distinct distal nerve transfer for upper facial function. CONCLUSION: The middle deep temporal branches can be readily identified and utilized for facial reanimation. This technique provided a successful reanimation of upper facial muscles with independent activation. Utilizing multiple sources for neurotization of the facial muscles, different potions of the face can be selectively reanimated to reduce the risk of synkinesis and improved control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170929
[Lr] Last revision date:170929
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ons/opx190

  8 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28834578
[Au] Autor:Mikuzuki L; Saito H; Katagiri A; Okada S; Sugawara S; Kubo A; Ohara K; Lee J; Toyofuku A; Iwata K
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, Nihon University School of Dentistry, 1-8-13 Kandasurugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 101-8310, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Phenotypic change in trigeminal ganglion neurons associated with satellite cell activation via extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation is involved in lingual neuropathic pain.
[So] Source:Eur J Neurosci;46(6):2190-2202, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1460-9568
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injuries remain a common and complex clinical problem. Satellite glial cell (SGC) activation, associated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and neuropeptide expression in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) are known to be involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain related to trigeminal nerve injury. However, the involvement of these molecules in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in lingual nerve crush (LNC) rats was observed in SGCs. To evaluate the role of neuron-SGC interactions under neuropathic pain, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (IR), phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERK1/2)-IR and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-IR cells in the TG were studied in LNC rats. The number of CGRP-IR neurons and neurons encircled with pERK1/2-IR SGCs was significantly larger in LNC rats compared with sham rats. The percentage of large-sized CGRP-IR neurons was significantly higher in LNC rats. The number of CGRP-IR neurons, neurons encircled with pERK1/2-IR SGCs, and neurons encircled with GFAP-IR SGCs was decreased following CGRP receptor blocker CGRP or mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase 1 inhibitor PD98059 administration into the TG after LNC. Reduced thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation to the tongue in LNC rats were also significantly recovered following CGRP or PD98059 administration. The present findings suggest that CGRP released from TG neurons activates SGCs through ERK1/2 phosphorylation and TG neuronal activity is enhanced, resulting in the tongue hypersensitivity associated with lingual nerve injury. The phenotypic switching of large myelinated TG neurons expressing CGRP may account for the pathogenesis of tongue neuropathic pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170918
[Lr] Last revision date:170918
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ejn.13667

  9 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28797041
[Au] Autor:Por ED; Sandoval ML; Thomas-Benson C; Burke TA; Doyle Brackley A; Jeske NA; Cleland JM; Lund BJ
[Ad] Address:Ocular Trauma, United States Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Repeat low-level blast exposure increases transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in the trigeminal ganglion.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(8):e0182102, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Blast-associated sensory and cognitive trauma sustained by military service members is an area of extensively studied research. Recent studies in our laboratory have revealed that low-level blast exposure increased expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), proteins well characterized for their role in mediating pain transmission, in the cornea. Determining the functional consequences of these alterations in protein expression is critical to understanding blast-related sensory trauma. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine TRPV1 and ET-1 expression in ocular associated sensory tissues following primary and tertiary blast. A rodent model of blast injury was used in which anesthetized animals, unrestrained or restrained, received a single or repeat blast (73.8 ± 5.5 kPa) from a compressed air shock tube once or daily for five consecutive days, respectively. Behavioral and functional analyses were conducted to assess blast effects on nocifensive behavior and TRPV1 activity. Immunohistochemistry and Western Blot were also performed with trigeminal ganglia (TG) to determine TRPV1, ET-1 and glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) expression following blast. Increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP were detected in the TG of animals exposed to repeat blast. Increased nocifensive responses were also observed in animals exposed to repeat, tertiary blast as compared to single blast and control. Moreover, decreased TRPV1 desensitization was observed in TG neurons exposed to repeat blast. Repeat, tertiary blast resulted in increased TRPV1, ET-1 and GFAP expression in the TG, enhanced nociception and decreased TRPV1 desensitization.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blast Injuries/metabolism
Endothelin-1/metabolism
Neurons/metabolism
TRPV Cation Channels/metabolism
Trigeminal Ganglion/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Male
Rats
Rats, Long-Evans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Endothelin-1); 0 (TRPV Cation Channels); 0 (Trpv1 protein, rat)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171009
[Lr] Last revision date:171009
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170811
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0182102

  10 / 1757 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28751945
[Au] Autor:Dorafshar AH; Dellon AL; Wan EL; Reddy S; Wong VW
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
[Ti] Title:Injured Anterior Superior Alveolar Nerve Endoscopically Resected within Maxillary Sinus.
[So] Source:Craniomaxillofac Trauma Reconstr;10(3):208-211, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3875
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Posttraumatic facial pain is due to an injured nerve, most often a branch of the trigeminal nerve. While surgical approaches to injuries of the supraorbital, supratrochlear, infraorbital, and inferior alveolar nerves have been reported, an injury to the anterior superior alveolar nerve (ASAN) has not been reported. An algorithm is proposed for the diagnosis of injury to the ASAN versus the infraorbital nerve itself. A case is reported in which pain relief was achieved by dividing the ASAN within the maxillary sinus, leaving the proximal end exposed within the sinus at the level of the orbital floor.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170730
[Lr] Last revision date:170730
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0036-1592088


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