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[PMID]: 29460276
[Au] Autor:Fiorini HJ; Tamaoki MJ; Lenza M; Gomes Dos Santos JB; Faloppa F; Belloti JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Borges Lagoa, n 783, 5° andar, São Paulo, Brazil, 04038-032.
[Ti] Title:Surgery for trigger finger.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;2:CD009860, 2018 02 20.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Trigger finger is a common clinical disorder, characterised by pain and catching as the patient flexes and extends digits because of disproportion between the diameter of flexor tendons and the A1 pulley. The treatment approach may include non-surgical or surgical treatments. Currently there is no consensus about the best surgical treatment approach (open, percutaneous or endoscopic approaches). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different methods of surgical treatment for trigger finger (open, percutaneous or endoscopic approaches) in adults at any stage of the disease. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS up to August 2017. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that assessed adults with trigger finger and compared any type of surgical treatment with each other or with any other non-surgical intervention. The major outcomes were the resolution of trigger finger, pain, hand function, participant-reported treatment success or satisfaction, recurrence of triggering, adverse events and neurovascular injury. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected the trial reports, extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias. Measures of treatment effect for dichotomous outcomes calculated risk ratios (RRs), and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMD) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). When possible, the data were pooled into meta-analysis using the random-effects model. GRADE was used to assess the quality of evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: Fourteen trials were included, totalling 1260 participants, with 1361 trigger fingers. The age of participants included in the studies ranged from 16 to 88 years; and the majority of participants were women (approximately 70%). The average duration of symptoms ranged from three to 15 months, and the follow-up after the procedure ranged from eight weeks to 23 months.The studies reported nine types of comparisons: open surgery versus steroid injections (two studies); percutaneous surgery versus steroid injection (five studies); open surgery versus steroid injection plus ultrasound-guided hyaluronic acid injection (one study); percutaneous surgery plus steroid injection versus steroid injection (one study); percutaneous surgery versus open surgery (five studies); endoscopic surgery versus open surgery (one study); and three comparisons of types of incision for open surgery (transverse incision of the skin in the distal palmar crease, transverse incision of the skin about 2-3 mm distally from distal palmar crease, and longitudinal incision of the skin) (one study).Most studies had significant methodological flaws and were considered at high or unclear risk of selection bias, performance bias, detection bias and reporting bias. The primary comparison was open surgery versus steroid injections, because open surgery is the oldest and the most widely used treatment method and considered as standard surgery, whereas steroid injection is the least invasive control treatment method as reported in the studies in this review and is often used as first-line treatment in clinical practice.Compared with steroid injection, there was low-quality evidence that open surgery provides benefits with respect to less triggering recurrence, although it has the disadvantage of being more painful. Evidence was downgraded due to study design flaws and imprecision.Based on two trials (270 participants) from six up to 12 months, 50/130 (or 385 per 1000) individuals had recurrence of trigger finger in the steroid injection group compared with 8/140 (or 65 per 1000; range 35 to 127) in the open surgery group, RR 0.17 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.33), for an absolute risk difference that 29% fewer people had recurrence of symptoms with open surgery (60% fewer to 3% more individuals); relative change translates to improvement of 83% in the open surgery group (67% to 91% better).At one week, 9/49 (184 per 1000) people had pain on the palm of the hand in the steroid injection group compared with 38/56 (or 678 per 1000; ranging from 366 to 1000) in the open surgery group, RR 3.69 (95% CI 1.99 to 6.85), for an absolute risk difference that 49% more had pain with open surgery (33% to 66% more); relative change translates to worsening of 269% (585% to 99% worse) (one trial, 105 participants).Because of very low quality evidence from two trials we are uncertain whether open surgery improve resolution of trigger finger in the follow-up at six to 12 months, when compared with steroid injection (131/140 observed in the open surgery group compared with 80/130 in the control group; RR 1.48, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.76); evidence was downgraded due to study design flaws, inconsistency and imprecision. Low-quality evidence from two trials and few event rates (270 participants) from six up to 12 months of follow-up, we are uncertain whether open surgery increased the risk of adverse events (incidence of infection, tendon injury, flare, cutaneous discomfort and fat necrosis) (18/140 observed in the open surgery group compared with 17/130 in the control group; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.84) and neurovascular injury (9/140 observed in the open surgery group compared with 4/130 in the control group; RR 2.17, 95% CI 0.7 to 6.77). Twelve participants (8 versus 4) did not complete the follow-up, and it was considered that they did not have a positive outcome in the data analysis. We are uncertain whether open surgery was more effective than steroid injection in improving hand function or participant satisfaction as studies did not report these outcomes. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Low-quality evidence indicates that, compared with steroid injection, open surgical treatment in people with trigger finger, may result in a less recurrence rate from six up to 12 months following the treatment, although it increases the incidence of pain during the first follow-up week. We are uncertain about the effect of open surgery with regard to the resolution rate in follow-up at six to 12 months, compared with steroid injections, due high heterogeneity and few events occurred in the trials; we are uncertain too about the risk of adverse events and neurovascular injury because of a few events occurred in the studies. Hand function or participant satisfaction were not reported.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009860.pub2

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[PMID]: 29191846
[Au] Autor:David M; Rangaraju M; Raine A
[Ad] Address:The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, UK michaeldavid@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Acquired triggering of the fingers and thumb in adults.
[So] Source:BMJ;359:j5285, 2017 11 30.
[Is] ISSN:1756-1833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hand Deformities, Acquired/pathology
Joint Deformities, Acquired/pathology
Tenosynovitis/pathology
Thumb/pathology
Trigger Finger Disorder/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
England/epidemiology
Female
Hand Deformities, Acquired/etiology
Hand Deformities, Acquired/surgery
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous
Joint Capsule Release/methods
Joint Deformities, Acquired/etiology
Joint Deformities, Acquired/surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Observational Studies as Topic
Prevalence
Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data
Steroids/administration & dosage
Steroids/therapeutic use
Tenosynovitis/etiology
Thumb/surgery
Trigger Finger Disorder/drug therapy
Trigger Finger Disorder/etiology
Trigger Finger Disorder/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Steroids)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171202
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmj.j5285

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[PMID]: 29409407
[Au] Autor:Wakasugi T; Shirasaka R; Kawauchi T; Fujita K; Okawa A
[Ad] Address:* Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tsuchiura Kyodo Hospital, Ibaraki, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Complications of Intramedullary Fixation for Distal Radius Fractures in Elderly Patients: A Retrospective Analysis Using McKay's Complication Checklist.
[So] Source:J Hand Surg Asian Pac Vol;23(1):71-75, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2424-8363
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Intramedullary fixation for distal radius fractures is reported to be free of hardware irritation and less invasive than other fixation methods. Some specific complications associated with intramedullary fixation, such as radial nerve sensory neuritis, have been reported, but no study has focused on the complication rates of intramedullary fixation for distal radius fractures in the elderly population. Furthermore, no studies have analyzed common complications, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and flexor tenosynovitis including trigger finger, among patients with distal radius fractures treated by intramedullary fixation based on a comprehensive complication checklist. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 52 elderly patients with distal radius fractures treated with intramedullary nail fixation. We investigated the postoperative complications in these patients using McKay's complication checklist. RESULTS: 5 patients experienced radial nerve sensory disorder, and one patients developed carpal tunnel syndrome. All neurological symptoms resolved spontaneously, and these neurological complications were categorized as mild. Further, 3 patients developed trigger finger at the A1 pulley and needed triamcinolone injections for symptomatic relief. There were no tendinous complications around the implanted hardware. All tendinous complications were categorized as moderate complications and resolved with steroid injection therapy. Among skeletal complications, 1 case of postoperative volar displacement resolved with good functional outcome without the need for corrective osteotomy. This was considered a mild complication. The total complication rate was 19.2%. All complications were categorized as mild or moderate, and no patients experienced severe complications that needed further surgery such as hardware removal. CONCLUSIONS: Intramedullary fixation for distal radius fractures was free from tendinous complications such as tenosynovitis and tendon ruptures around the implant, which are frequently caused by volar locking plate fixation. However, this less invasive technique could not avoid common complications such as trigger finger and carpal tunnel syndrome associated with distal radius fractures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1142/S2424835518500091

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[PMID]: 29205686
[Au] Autor:Liu W; Liu J; Tan X; Wang S
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:Ultrasound-guided lower forearm median nerve block in open surgery for trigger thumb in 1- to 3-year-old children: A randomized trial.
[So] Source:Paediatr Anaesth;28(2):134-141, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1460-9592
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIM: Trigger thumb is a common hand disability in children and is primarily treated with open surgery. A conscious median nerve block can usually meet the requirements for trigger thumb-releasing surgery in adults; however, its effectiveness in children requires further clarification. The present study aims to demonstrate whether ultrasound-guided lower forearm median nerve blockade is a viable option for children undergoing open surgery for trigger thumb. METHODS: A prospective randomized study was designed to compare median nerve blocks guided by ultrasonography with those guided by anatomic landmarks. Following induction of general anesthesia, the children received a median nerve block performed either by ultrasound-guided block of the lower forearm (group U) or landmark-based blocking at the proximal wrist crease level (group T) with a 0.2% ropivacaine injection. The success rates were compared between groups as the primary endpoint; additional sufentanil and propofol administration, anesthesia recovery time, and other secondary endpoints were also compared. RESULTS: A total of 100 children (age 1-3 years) with ASA status I who were scheduled for open surgery for trigger thumb were included in this study (n = 50 per group). Thirty-seven children in group T and 50 children in group U underwent successful blocks. The rate of unsuccessful blockade was significantly lower in group U than group T (0% and 26%, respectively), and rate of additional sufentanil and propofol administration was also lower in group U than in group T. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound-guided lower forearm median nerve block can provide more effective analgesia, a higher success rate, and lower general and local anesthetic dosages than the anatomic landmark-based blocking method in children undergoing open surgery for trigger thumb.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180118
[Lr] Last revision date:180118
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pan.13296

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[PMID]: 29156706
[Au] Autor:Liu H; Kong X; Chen F
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Mkrn3 functions as a novel ubiquitin E3 ligase to inhibit Nptx1 during puberty initiation.
[So] Source:Oncotarget;8(49):85102-85109, 2017 Oct 17.
[Is] ISSN:1949-2553
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Central precocious puberty (CPP) is attributed to the disorder of some trigger factors those can activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controlled by GnRH neurons. Many recent studies reveal one of those trigger factors, Makorin ring finger protein 3 (Mkrn3), whose loss-of-function mutations are implicated in CPP. Although Mkrn3 contained zinc Ring finger domain is considered as a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, its actual function is never reported. Here, our results demonstrated that in mice hypothalamus before and when puberty initiated, Mkrn3 expressed the reversed tendency with Nptx1, which is an important secreted protein for neuron development. Furthermore, our data manifested that Mkrn3 interacted and suppressed Nptx1 activity. And the Ring finger domain of Mkrn3 contained was determined to be essential for binding with Nptx1 for its polyubiquitination during the puberty initiation. Our study shed light on the molecular insights into the function of Mkrn3 in the events of puberty initiation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171123
[Lr] Last revision date:171123
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.18632/oncotarget.19347

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[PMID]: 29105514
[Au] Autor:Gutefeldt K; Hedman CA; Thyberg ISM; Bachrach-Lindström M; Arnqvist HJ; Spångeus A
[Ad] Address:a Department of Endocrinology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences , Linköping University , Linköping , Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes with long duration; common problems with great impact on daily life.
[So] Source:Disabil Rehabil;:1-8, 2017 Nov 05.
[Is] ISSN:1464-5165
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence, activity limitations and potential risk factors of upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes in comparison to controls. METHODS: In a cross-sectional population-based study in the southeast of Sweden, patients with type 1 diabetes <35 years at onset, duration ≥20 years, <67 years old and matched controls were invited to answer a questionnaire on upper extremity impairments and activity limitations and to take blood samples. RESULTS: Seven hundred and seventy-three patients (ages 50 ± 10 years, diabetes duration 35 ± 10 years) and 708 controls (ages 54 ± 9 years) were included. Shoulder pain and stiffness, hand paraesthesia and finger impairments were common in patients with a prevalence of 28-48%, which was 2-4-folds higher than in controls. Compared to controls, the patients had more bilateral impairments, often had coexistence of several upper extremity impairments, and in the presence of impairments, reported more pronounced activity limitations. Female gender (1.72 (1.066-2.272), p = 0.014), longer duration (1.046 (1.015-1.077), p = 0.003), higher body mass index (1.08 (1.017-1.147), p = 0.013) and HbA1c (1.029 (1.008-1.05), p = 0.007) were associated with upper extremity impairments. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to controls, patients with type 1 diabetes have a high prevalence of upper extremity impairments, often bilateral, which are strongly associated with activity limitations. Recognising these in clinical practise is crucial, and improved preventative, therapeutic and rehabilitative interventions are needed. Implications for rehabilitation Upper extremity impairments affecting the shoulder, hand and fingers are common in patients with type 1 diabetes, the prevalence being 2-4-fold higher compared to non-diabetic persons. Patients with diabetes type 1 with upper extremity impairments have more pronounced limitations in daily activities compared to controls with similar impairments. Recognising upper extremity impairments and activity limitations are important and improved preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitation methods are needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171106
[Lr] Last revision date:171106
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/09638288.2017.1397202

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[PMID]: 28870061
[Au] Autor:Takahashi M; Sato R; Kondo K; Sairyo K
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, Tokushima Prefectural Central Hospital, Tokushima, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Morphological alterations of the tendon and pulley on ultrasound after intrasynovial injection of betamethasone for trigger digit.
[So] Source:Ultrasonography;, 2017 Jul 25.
[Is] ISSN:2288-5919
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: The aim of this study was to elucidate whether intrasynovial corticosteroid injections for trigger digit reduced the volume of the tendon and pulley on high-resolution ultrasonography. Methods: Twenty-three digits of 20 patients with trigger digit were included. Each affected finger was graded clinically according to the following classification: grade I for pre-triggering, grade II for active triggering, grade III for passive triggering, and grade IV for presence of contracture. Axial ultrasound examinations were performed before an intrasynovial corticosteroid injection and at an average of 31 days after the injection. The transverse diameter, thickness, and cross-sectional area of the tendon and the thickness of the pulley were measured by two independent, blinded researchers. Results: At least 1 grade of improvement was achieved in this study group by the time of the second examination. The transverse diameter and cross-sectional area of the tendon and the thickness of the pulley significantly decreased (P<0.05). Conclusion: The injection of a single dose of betamethasone improved clinical symptoms by reducing the volume of both the tendon and pulley, which may be related to the fact that tendon and pulley ruptures are delayed by corticosteroid injections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170905
[Lr] Last revision date:170905
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.14366/usg.17038

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[PMID]: 28860097
[Au] Autor:Huisstede BM; Gladdines S; Randsdorp MS; Koes BW
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy Sciences & Sports, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience - University Medical Center Utrecht. Electronic address: b.m.a.huisstede@umcutrecht.nl.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of conservative, surgical, and post-surgical interventions for Trigger finger, Dupuytren's disease, and De Quervain's disease. A systematic review.
[So] Source:Arch Phys Med Rehabil;, 2017 Aug 28.
[Is] ISSN:1532-821X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To provide an evidence-based overview of the effectiveness of conservative and (post)-surgical interventions for trigger finger, Dupuytren's -, and De Quervain's disease. DATA SOURCES: The Cochrane Library, PEDro, PubMed, Embase and CINAHL were searched to identify relevant systematic reviews and RCTs. DATA SELECTION AND EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality. DATA SYNTHESIS: A best-evidence synthesis was performed to summarize the results. RESULTS: Two reviews (trigger finger, Quervain's) and 37 RCTs (trigger finger(8), Dupuytren's(14), Quervain's (15)) were included. The trials reported on oral medication (Dupuytren's), physiotherapy (Quervain's) injections and surgical treatment (trigger finger, Dupuytren's, Quervain's), other conservative (Quervain's), and postsurgical treatment (Dupuytren's). Moderate evidence was found for the effect of corticosteroid injection on the very short-term for trigger finger, De Quervain's disease, and for injections with Collagenase on the very short-term (30 days) when looking at all joints, no evidence was found when looking at the PIP joint for Dupuytren's disease. A thumb-splint as additive to a corticosteroid injections seem to be effective (moderate evidence) for De Quervain's diseae (short-, midterm). For Dupuytren's disease use of a corticosteroid injection within a Percutaneous Needle Aponeurotomy in midterm, and Tamoxifen versus a placebo before/after a fasciectomy seems to promising (moderate evidence). We also found moderate evidence for splinting after Dupuytren's surgery in short-term. CONCLUSIONS: In recent years more and more RCTs have been conducted to study treatment of the above-mentioned hand disorders. However, more high-quality RCTs are still needed in order to further stimulate evidence-based practice for patients with trigger finger, Dupuytren's disease, and De Quervain's disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170901
[Lr] Last revision date:170901
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 28836453
[Au] Autor:Akinleye SD; Garofolo-Gonzalez G; Montuori M; Culbertson MD; Hashem J; Edelstein DM
[Ad] Address:1 Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Readability of the Most Commonly Accessed Online Patient Education Materials Pertaining to Pathology of the Hand.
[So] Source:Hand (N Y);:1558944717726138, 2017 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1558-9455
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The American Medical Association (AMA) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommend that patient education materials be written at no higher than a sixth-grade reading level. METHODS: We examined 100 online educational materials for the 10 hand conditions most commonly treated by hand surgeons, as reported by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. The listed conditions were carpal tunnel syndrome, basal joint arthritis of the thumb, de Quervain syndrome, Dupuytren's contracture, ganglion cysts, hand fractures, trigger finger, extensor tendon injuries, flexor tendon injuries, and mallet finger. Following a Google search for each condition, we analyzed the 10 most visited websites for each disorder utilizing the Flesch-Kincaid formula. RESULTS: The average grade reading level of the 100 websites studied was 9.49 with a reading ease of 53.03 ("fairly difficult high school"). Only 29% of the websites were at or below the national average of an eighth-grade reading level. Carpal tunnel syndrome had the highest average grade reading level at 10.32 (standard deviation: 1.52), whereas hand fractures had the lowest at 8.14 (2.03). Every hand condition in this study had an average readability at or above the ninth-grade reading level. CONCLUSIONS: The most frequently accessed materials for common maladies of the hand exceed both the readability limits recommended by the AMA and NIH, and the average reading ability of most US adults. Therefore, the most commonly accessed websites pertaining to hand pathology may not be comprehended by the audience for which it is intended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170824
[Lr] Last revision date:170824
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1558944717726138

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[PMID]: 28709917
[Au] Autor:Chuang XL; Ooi CC; Chin ST; Png MA; Wong SK; Tay SC; McGrouther DA
[Ad] Address:Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
[Ti] Title:What triggers in trigger finger? The flexor tendons at the flexor digitorum superficialis bifurcation.
[So] Source:J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg;70(10):1411-1419, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1878-0539
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To define the role of the flexor tendons in trigger finger, a high-resolution ultrasound examination was performed in 20 trigger fingers and 20 normal contralateral digits in three digital postures: full extension, mid-flexion and near-full flexion. Precise measurements of diameter and cross-sectional area of the combined tendon mass were recorded at five clearly defined locations: summit of the metacarpal head, proximal lip of the proximal phalanx (PP) and at 1/8, 1/4 and 1/2 length of the PP. In the normal tendons, there was an anatomical thickening, not previously appreciated at 1/4 length PP, in the region of the FDS bifurcation. This anatomical region moved proximally on finger flexion to the A1 pulley. In trigger fingers, the flexor tendons had greater diameter (sagittal view) and cross-sectional area than the normal side at all locations (p < 0.01, p < 0.001), with an even greater increase in diameter in the FDS bifurcation area (p < 0.001). Trigger fingers also had thicker A1 pulleys (p < 0.001). Triggering occurs on flexing the finger when the enlarged combined flexor tendon mass at the specific anatomical region of the FDS bifurcation impacts on the thickened A1 pulley, resisting its excursion.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fingers
Trigger Finger Disorder
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Anatomy, Cross-Sectional
Female
Fingers/anatomy & histology
Fingers/pathology
Fingers/physiopathology
Humans
Male
Metacarpophalangeal Joint/physiopathology
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal/pathology
Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology
Range of Motion, Articular
Tendons/pathology
Tendons/physiopathology
Trigger Finger Disorder/diagnosis
Trigger Finger Disorder/physiopathology
Ultrasonography/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170928
[Lr] Last revision date:170928
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170716
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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