Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ureaplasma and Infections [Words]
References found : 2050 [refine]
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  1 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376609
[Au] Autor:Chubukova OA; Shkarin VV
[Ad] Address:Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy of Minzdrav of Russia, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Concomitant urogenital infections in men].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):126-130, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The article presents possible combinations of urogenital infections of various etiologies and some pathogenetic, clinical and epidemiological features, and issues of epidemiological surveillance for co-infection. The authors describe in detail combinations with each other and with other diseases of such pathogens as Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma spp., Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis. They also focus on the problem of co-occurrence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with other urogenital pathogens. The article raises the question of the need to introduce new scientific data on the epidemiology of concomitant urogenital infections in men in the practice of diagnosis, treatment, registration, and implementation of preventive and anti-epidemic measures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coinfection
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
Papillomavirus Infections
Urinary Tract Infections
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Coinfection/diagnosis
Coinfection/microbiology
Coinfection/therapy
Coinfection/virology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/diagnosis
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/microbiology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/therapy
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/virology
Humans
Male
Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis
Papillomavirus Infections/microbiology
Papillomavirus Infections/therapy
Urinary Tract Infections/diagnosis
Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology
Urinary Tract Infections/therapy
Urinary Tract Infections/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29271025
[Au] Autor:Xu WH; Chen JJ; Sun Q; Wang LP; Jia YF; Xuan BB; Xu B; Sheng HM
[Ad] Address:Clinical Laboratory, Shanghai Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among Chinese women with urinary tract infections in Shanghai: A community-based cross-sectional study.
[So] Source:J Obstet Gynaecol Res;44(3):495-502, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1447-0756
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: This study explored chlamydia trachomatis (CT), ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) and/or neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) in 5893 women with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Shanghai. METHODS: From January 2009 to December 2014, 5893 women with UTIs in Shanghai were selected to undergo CT, UU and NG detection. Baseline characteristics including age, education level, occupation, reproductive history, sexual behavior and contraceptive method were obtained for epidemiological analysis. RESULTS: The total CT, UU and/or NG infection rate in the urine samples of 5893 patients was 50.69% (2987/5893), while the infection rate in vaginal secretion samples was 56.22% (3313/5893). The two detection methods were consistent. Patients aged 21-30, service personnel and unemployed persons had the highest rates of CT, UU and/or NG infection, while patients with higher education levels exhibited lower rates. As the number of previous pregnancies, natural births, abortions, sexual partners and the frequency of sexual intercourse increased, the rates of CT, UU and/or NG infection were elevated. Sexual intercourse during the menstruation period, a lack of cleaning before sexual intercourse and the use of intrauterine devices could all lead to an increased rate of CT, UU and/or NG infection. CONCLUSIONS: These data revealed that the rate of CT, UU and/or NG infection may be associated with age, education level, occupation, reproductive history, sexual behavior and type of contraceptive method in female patients with UTI in Shanghai.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jog.13526

  3 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498739
[Au] Autor:Foschi C; Salvo M; Galli S; Moroni A; Cevenini R; Marangoni A
[Ad] Address:Microbiology, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of genital Mollicutes in Italy over a two-year period.
[So] Source:New Microbiol;41(1), 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1121-7138
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Knowledge of the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of genital Mollicutes is crucial to offer guidelines for empirical treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and the resistance profile of Mycoplasma hominis (MH) and Ureaplasma urealyticum/Ureaplasma parvum (UU/UP) in genital samples over a two-year period in Bologna, Italy. From January 2015 to December 2016, data on all the subjects providing uro-genital specimens for Mollicutes detection by culture were analyzed. A total of 4660 subjects (84.4% females) were enrolled and an overall Mollicutes prevalence of 30.9% was found. Women turned positive for Mollicutes infection twice as often as men (33.3% vs 17.8%) and the detection rate progressively decreased with increasing age. Ureaplasmas represented the commonest species isolated (overall prevalence: 24.2%), whereas mixed infections (6.5%) and MH single infections (3.9%) were far less common. Ureaplasma species showed significant levels of quinolone resistance, especially to ciprofloxacin (77%), whereas MH strains were non-susceptible to azithromycin and roxithromycin in about 90% of cases. Mollicutes co-infections showed a more severe resistance pattern than single infections. Over time, the resistance rate for azithromycin and roxithromycin increased significantly. Globally, our results revealed that minocycline and doxycycline can still be first-line drugs for Mollicutes treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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Timenetsky, Jorge
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[PMID]: 29428309
[Au] Autor:Campos GB; Marques LM; Rezende IS; Barbosa MS; Abrão MS; Timenetsky J
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Institute of Biomedical Science, São Paulo University, São Paulo, Brazil; Multidisciplinary Institute of Health, Federal University of Bahia, Vitória da Conquita, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Mycoplasma genitalium can modulate the local immune response in patients with endometriosis.
[So] Source:Fertil Steril;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1556-5653
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To detect Mollicutes in women with endometriosis and healthy peritoneal tissues and evaluate the participation of these bacteria in the immune response during endometriosis. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: University hospitals. PATIENT (S): Women with endometriosis (n = 73) and without endometriosis (n = 31). INTERVENTION(S): Endocervical swabs, peritoneal fluid, and biopsied lesions of endometriosis of women with endometriosis (study group) and healthy peritoneal tissues (control group) were collected during surgery. Clinical characteristics were registered before surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): We determined the infectious agents with the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cytokine secretion profile was determined with the use of Luminex. The expression of immune response related genes was determined with the use of a PCR array kit. RESULT(S): All target microorganisms were detected at least once in the swab samples analyzed. It was possible to observe higher diversity of microorganisms in the samples of swab and peritoneal fluid in the study group compared with the control. Ureaplasma parvum was associated with the severity of the symptom dyspareunia. Mycoplasma genitalium was associated with higher production of interferon-γ and interleukin-1ß. Genes of inflammatory response activation and antigen presentation were up-regulated in biopsied tissue of women with endometriosis. In women with endometriosis, peritoneal fluid cells showed a down-regulation of genes associated with the inflammatory response. This down-regulation profile was higher in presence of M. genitalium. CONCLUSION(S): Mycoplasma genitalium may play a key role in the immune tolerance process and, especially, the aggravation of this profile. More studies are needed to understand this immune tolerance profile of bacterial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180211
[Lr] Last revision date:180211
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29363502
[Au] Autor:Poets CF; Lorenz L
[Ad] Address:Department of Neonatology, University Children's Hospital, Tübingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely low gestational age neonates: current evidence.
[So] Source:Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed;, 2018 Jan 23.
[Is] ISSN:1468-2052
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most frequent complications in extremely low gestational age neonates, but has remained largely unchanged in rate. We reviewed data on BPD prevention focusing on recent meta-analyses. Interventions with proven effectiveness in reducing BPD include the primary use of non-invasive respiratory support, the application of surfactant without endotracheal ventilation and the use of volume-targeted ventilation in infants requiring endotracheal intubation. Following extubation, synchronised nasal ventilation is more effective than continuous positive airway pressure in reducing BPD. Pharmacologically, commencing caffeine citrate on postnatal day 1 or 2 seems more effective than a later start. Applying intramuscular vitamin A for the first 4 weeks reduces BPD, but is expensive and painful and thus not widely used. Low-dose hydrocortisone for the first 10 days prevents BPD, but was associated with almost twice as many cases of late-onset sepsis in infants born at 24-25 weeks' gestation. Inhaled corticosteroids, despite reducing BPD, were associated with a higher mortality rate. Administering dexamethasone to infants still requiring mechanical ventilation around postnatal weeks 2-3 may represent the best trade-off between restricting steroids to infants at risk of BPD while still affording high efficacy. Finally, identifying infants colonised with ureaplasma and treating those requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation with azithromycin is another promising approach to BPD prevention. Further interventions yet only backed by cohort studies include exclusive breastmilk feeding and a better prevention of nosocomial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180124
[Lr] Last revision date:180124
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29313203
[Au] Autor:Zhou YH; Ma HX; Yang Y; Gu WM
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Laboratory, Shanghai Crops Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Ureaplasma spp. and Mycoplasma hominis isolated from semen samples of infertile men in Shanghai, China from 2011 to 2016.
[So] Source:Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 08.
[Is] ISSN:1435-4373
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance rate of Ureaplasma spp. and Mycoplasma hominis that were isolated from the semen samples of infertile males in Shanghai, China from 2011 to 2016. A total of 5016 infertile males and 412 healthy male controls were examined. The cultivation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Ureaplasma spp. and M. hominis were assessed by using a Mycoplasma IST kit that was performed in parallel to selective solid agar cultivation. The positive rate of genital Mycoplasma infections in infertile men from 2011 to 2016 was 30-55%, which initially decreased during the first four years and then increased in the last two. Two distinct high-risk age ranges of Mycoplasma infections were observed: 26-30 years (37.8%) and 31-35 years (30.7%). Semisynthetic tetracyclines and macrolide antibiotics were the most effective agents against Ureaplasma spp. Among the fluoroquinolones, sparfloxacin and levofloxacin were also effective. Antibiotic resistance of Ureaplasma spp. against tetracyclines and macrolide antibiotics in the last six years did not vary significantly. However, the rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones (except norfloxacin) and spectinomycin decreased in the last two years. The rate of genital Mycoplasma presence in infertile patients between the ages of 26 and 35 years in Shanghai was high. The prevalence of genital Mycoplasma decreased during the first four years and then increased, with a peak in 2016. Doxycycline, minocycline, josamycin, and sparfloxacin can be recommended for first-line empirical treatment of Mycoplasma infections in infertile men in Shanghai, China.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180109
[Lr] Last revision date:180109
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10096-017-3167-5

  7 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29225146
[Au] Autor:Hahn A; Warnken S; Pérez-Losada M; Freishtat RJ; Crandall KA
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Children's National Health System (CNHS), Washington, D.C. 20010, USA; Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University (GWU) School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS), Washington, D.C. 20052, USA. Electronic address: alhahn@childrensnational.org.
[Ti] Title:Microbial diversity within the airway microbiome in chronic pediatric lung diseases.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The study of the airway microbiome in children is an area of emerging research, especially in relation to the role microbial diversity may play in acute and chronic inflammation. Three such pediatric airway diseases include cystic fibrosis, asthma, and chronic lung disease of prematurity. In cystic fibrosis, the presence of Pseudomonas spp. is associated with decreased microbial diversity. Decreasing microbial diversity is also associated with poor lung function. In asthma, early viral infections appear to drive changes in bacterial diversity which may be associated with asthma risk. Premature infants with Ureaplasma spp. are at higher risk for chronic lung disease due to inflammation. Microbiome changes due to prematurity also appear to affect the inflammatory response to viral infections post-natally. Importantly, microbial diversity can be measured using metataxonomic (e.g., 16S rRNA sequencing) and metagenomic (e.g., shotgun sequencing) approaches. A metagenomics approach may be preferable as it can provide further granularity of the sample composition, identifying the bacterial species or strain, information on additional microbial components, including fungal and viral components, information about functional genomics of the microbiome, and information about antimicrobial resistance mutations. Future studies of pediatric airway diseases incorporating these techniques may provide evidence for new treatment approaches for these vulnerable patient populations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180106
[Lr] Last revision date:180106
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29269957
[Au] Autor:Combaz-Söhnchen N; Kuhn A
[Ad] Address:Abteilung Frau und Kind, Spital Sitten, Sitten, Schweiz.
[Ti] Title:A Systematic Review of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma in Urogynaecology.
[So] Source:Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd;77(12):1299-1303, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0016-5751
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mycoplasma species relevant to the urogenital tract include mycoplasma hominis, mycoplasma genitalia and ureaplasma urealyticum. Their occurrence in the context of urogynaecological disease has been demonstrated in urethritis, cystitis and upper renal tract infections. Their role in hyperactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is controversial. All the above-mentioned microorganisms can occur as commensals or as potential pathogens. In most cases their role in any particular pathology cannot be proven, only presumed. The aim of this systematic review was to summarise current knowledge on the influence of mycoplasma and ureaplasma in urogynaecological pathology and to provide clinical guidance on diagnosis (when and how is pathogen detection indicated?) and treatment. 377 relevant articles were analysed. In summary: a urethral swab for PCR analysis of the three bacteria should be performed in the context of symptomatic sterile leukocyturia, chronic urethritis and suspected hyperactive bladder or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Symptomatic women should be treated strictly according to results of the antibiogram.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171224
[Lr] Last revision date:171224
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0043-119687

  9 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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Alfieri, Alice Fernandes
Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo
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[PMID]: 29191491
[Au] Autor:Voltarelli DC; de Alcântara BK; Lunardi M; Alfieri AF; de Arruda Leme R; Alfieri AA
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Animal Virology, Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:A nested-PCR strategy for molecular diagnosis of mollicutes in uncultured biological samples from cows with vulvovaginitis.
[So] Source:Anim Reprod Sci;188:137-143, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2232
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bacteria classified in Mycoplasma (M. bovis and M. bovigenitalium) and Ureaplasma (U. diversum) genera are associated with granular vulvovaginitis that affect heifers and cows at reproductive age. The traditional means for detection and speciation of mollicutes from clinical samples have been culture and serology. However, challenges experienced with these laboratory methods have hampered assessment of their impact in pathogenesis and epidemiology in cattle worldwide. The aim of this study was to develop a PCR strategy to detect and primarily discriminate between the main species of mollicutes associated with reproductive disorders of cattle in uncultured clinical samples. In order to amplify the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region of the genome, a consensual and species-specific nested-PCR assay was developed to identify and discriminate between main species of mollicutes. In addition, 31 vaginal swab samples from dairy and beef affected cows were investigated. This nested-PCR strategy was successfully employed in the diagnosis of single and mixed mollicute infections of diseased cows from cattle herds from Brazil. The developed system enabled the rapid and unambiguous identification of the main mollicute species known to be associated with this cattle reproductive disorder through differential amplification of partial fragments of the ITS region of mollicute genomes. The development of rapid and sensitive tools for mollicute detection and discrimination without the need for previous cultures or sequencing of PCR products is a high priority for accurate diagnosis in animal health. Therefore, the PCR strategy described herein may be helpful for diagnosis of this class of bacteria in genital swabs submitted to veterinary diagnostic laboratories, not demanding expertise in mycoplasma culture and identification.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171224
[Lr] Last revision date:171224
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 2050 MEDLINE  
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Villa, Luisa Lina
Timenetsky, Jorge
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[PMID]: 29246195
[Au] Autor:Amorim AT; Marques LM; Campos GB; Lobão TN; de Souza Lino V; Cintra RC; Andreoli MA; Villa LL; Boccardo E; Junior ACRB; López RVM; Dos Santos DB; de Souza GM; Romano CC; Timenetsky J
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, ICB/USP, Avenue Prof. Lineu Prestes n°1374 - Butantã, São Paulo, SP, 05508-900, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Co-infection of sexually transmitted pathogens and Human Papillomavirus in cervical samples of women of Brazil.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;17(1):769, 2017 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Some sexually transmitted infectious agents, such as Chlamydia trachomatis and Herpes simplex, cause local inflammation, and could contribute to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical lesion progression. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine any association between the presence of microorganisms of gynecological importance, sexual behavior, clinical and demographical variables to the development and progress of cervical lesions. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-two women between 14 and 78 years and living at Vitória da Conquista, Bahia, Brazil, were included (62 individuals with cervical lesions and 70 without lesions). They answered a questionnaire to provide data for a socioeconomic and sexual activity profile. Samples of cervical swabs were collected and analyzed by PCR to detect genital microorganisms and HPV. Quantitative PCR was used to detect and quantify Ureaplasma urealyticum and Ureaplasma parvum. Univariate and multiple logistic regression were performed to measure the association with the cervical lesions, and an odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated. The Mann-Whitney U test was also used to compare the microorganism load in the case and control groups. The significance level was 5% in all hypotheses tested. RESULTS: Cervical lesions were associated with: women in a stable sexual relationship (OR = 14.21, 95%CI = 3.67-55.018), positive PCR for HPV (OR = 16.81, 95%CI = 4.19-67.42), Trichomonas vaginalis (OR = 8.566, 95%CI = 2.04-35.94) and Gardnerella vaginalis (OR = 6.13, 95%CI = 1.53-24.61), adjusted by age and qPCR for U. parvum. U. parvum load showed a statistical difference between the case and control groups (p-value = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Variables such as stable relationship, HPV, T. vaginalis, G. vaginalis were associated with cervical lesions in epidemiological studies. U. parvum load was higher in woman with cervical lesions compared with women without lesions. Additional studies are needed to better understand the role of these factors in cervical lesion development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171222
[Lr] Last revision date:171222
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-017-2835-5


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