Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Ureterolithiasis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29504861
[Au] Autor:Pavia PR; Berent AC; Weisse CW; Neiman D; Lamb K; Bagley D
[Ti] Title:Outcome of ureteral stent placement for treatment of benign ureteral obstruction in dogs: 44 cases (2010-2013).
[So] Source:J Am Vet Med Assoc;252(6):721-731, 2018 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1943-569X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE To describe the technique and short- and long-term outcomes for dogs undergoing double-pigtail ureteral stent placement for treatment of benign ureteral obstruction. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 44 dogs (57 ureters). PROCEDURES Medical records of dogs that underwent ureteral stenting for treatment of benign ureteral obstruction between 2010 and 2013 were reviewed. Signal-ment, history, pertinent diagnostic imaging results, endourologic and post-procedural details, duration of hospitalization, complications, and outcome (short term, 7 to 30 days; long term, > 30 days) were recorded. Ureteral stent placement was performed endoscopically, surgically, or both, with fluoroscopic guidance. RESULTS 57 ureters (44 dogs) underwent stenting because of obstructive ureterolithiasis (n = 48 [84%]), stricture (5 [9%]), or both (4 [7%]). Endoscopic or surgical techniques were successful for stent placement in 45 of 55 and 12 of 12 ureters (34/42 and 10/10 dogs), respectively. Median hospitalization time was 1 day. Median creatinine concentration was 2 mg/dL prior to stenting and 1.3 mg/dL 3 months after the procedure. Urinary tract infections were present in 26 of 44 (59%) dogs prior to stenting and in 11 of 43 dogs (26%) after stenting. One of the 44 (2%) dogs died after undergoing stenting, but the cause of death was not related to the procedure. Median follow-up time was 1,158 days (range, 3 to > 1,555 days), with 30 of 44 dogs alive at the time of last follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that ureteral stenting may be a viable option for first-line treatment of dogs with benign ureteral obstruction. However, patients should be monitored for urinary tract infection following stenting.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2460/javma.252.6.721

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[PMID]: 29487266
[Au] Autor:Joshi MP; Zade PS; Doshi BH; Gavai MS
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatric Surgery, Dr. Ulhas Patil Medical College and Hospital, Jalgaon, Maharashtra, India.
[Ti] Title:Paediatric ureterolithotripsy: Tips and tricks - Experience at a single center.
[So] Source:Afr J Paediatr Surg;14(1):1-4, 2017 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0974-5998
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Paediatric stone disease is very common in certain regions of India. Traditionally, the endourology for the stones even in paediatric age group is managed by adult urologist and paediatric surgeons tend to do open surgeries. The nonavailability of paediatric size equipments and lack of training at the teaching and tertiary care paediatric surgical centers in India are factors due to which there is continued apathy of paediatric surgeons to endourology. The aim of this study was to discuss the feasibility of paediatric ureterolithotripsy for successful procedure. We introduced the paediatric ureterolithotripsy as per the predecided indications of stone size up to 15 mm in paediatric ureterolithiasis at a tertiary care center in rural set up. Subjects and Methods:: Patients up to 18 years of age presenting with ureterolithiasis and not responding to conservative treatment or who needed endourological intervention were included in the study. Results:: Thirty-one patients underwent uretero lithotripsy (URSL) for ureteric calculus with more than 95% clearance rate. Conclusions:: Single-stage paediatric ureterolithotripsy is quite feasible and effective in achieving the stone clearance in paediatric ureterolithiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0189-6725.226199

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[PMID]: 29198004
[Au] Autor:Sullere A; Sureka B; Khera PS
[Ad] Address:Department of Diagnostic & Interventional Radiology, AIIMS, Jodhpur, 342005, India.
[Ti] Title:'Stone street' ureter.
[So] Source:Abdom Radiol (NY);, 2017 Dec 02.
[Is] ISSN:2366-0058
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We would like to submit an interesting image of ureteric steinstrasse post lithotripsy procedure resembling a cobble stone street.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171203
[Lr] Last revision date:171203
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00261-017-1416-9

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[PMID]: 29152209
[Au] Autor:Harch PG; Andrews SR; Fogarty EF; Lucarini J; Van Meter KW
[Ad] Address:Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Case control study: hyperbaric oxygen treatment of mild traumatic brain injury persistent post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.
[So] Source:Med Gas Res;7(3):156-174, 2017 Jul-Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2045-9912
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) persistent post-concussion syndrome (PPCS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are epidemic in United States Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans. Treatment of the combined diagnoses is limited. The aim of this study is to assess safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen treatments (HBOT) for mild TBI PPCS and PTSD. Thirty military subjects aged 18-65 with PPCS with or without PTSD and from one or more blast-induced mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries that were a minimum of 1 year old and occurred after 9/11/2001 were studied. The measures included symptom lists, physical exam, neuropsychological and psychological testing on 29 subjects (1 dropout) and SPECT brain imaging pre and post HBOT. Comparison was made using SPECT imaging on 29 matched Controls. Side effects (30 subjects) experienced due to the HBOT: reversible middle ear barotrauma ( = 6), transient deterioration in symptoms ( = 7), reversible bronchospasm ( = 1), and increased anxiety ( = 2; not related to confinement); unrelated to HBOT: ureterolithiasis ( = 1), chest pain ( = 2). Significant improvement (29 subjects) was seen in neurological exam, symptoms, intelligence quotient, memory, measures of attention, dominant hand motor speed and dexterity, quality of life, general anxiety, PTSD, depression (including reduction in suicidal ideation), and reduced psychoactive medication usage. At 6-month follow-up subjects reported further symptomatic improvement. Compared to Controls the subjects' SPECT was significantly abnormal, significantly improved after 1 and 40 treatments, and became statistically indistinguishable from Controls in 75% of abnormal areas. HBOT was found to be safe and significantly effective for veterans with mild to moderate TBI PPCS with PTSD in all four outcome domains: clinical medicine, neuropsychology, psychology, and SPECT imaging. Veterans also experienced a significant reduction in suicidal ideation and reduction in psychoactive medication use.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171122
[Lr] Last revision date:171122
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2045-9912.215745

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[PMID]: 29135147
[Au] Autor:Tarasenko AI; Pushkarev AM; Rakipov IG; Alekseev AV; Kondratenko YV; Pavlov VN
[Ad] Address:Bashkir State Medical University of Minzdrav of Russia, Department of Urology with the Course of IPE, Ufa, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Biomarkers of renal injury in contact ureteral lithotripsy].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(5):75-79, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To optimize the transurethral endoscopic management of patients with ureterolithiasis by measuring biomarkers of renal parenchymal damage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred fifty-one patients with solitary ureteral stones were tested for levels of cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, 2-microglobulin and interleukin 18. RESULTS: An increase in the levels of markers of renal injury was observed both in the preoperative period and after CULT. Differences in the values of these indices depended on the timing of the CULT, the size and location of the stone and the type of lithotripter. CONCLUSIONS: All patients were found to have damage to the renal tubular system. The established critical values of the markers of renal injury in ureterolithiasis may be used as diagnostic criteria for renal injury.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171114
[Lr] Last revision date:171114
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29048226
[Au] Autor:Wollin DA; Carlos EC; Tom WR; Simmons WN; Preminger GM; Lipkin ME
[Ad] Address:1 Division of Urologic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center , Durham, North Carolina.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Laser Settings and Irrigation Rates on Ureteral Temperature During Holmium Laser Lithotripsy, an In Vitro Model.
[So] Source:J Endourol;, 2017 Nov 15.
[Is] ISSN:1557-900X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy requires irrigation for adequate visualization and temperature control during treatment of ureteral stones. However, there are little data on how different irrigation and laser settings affect the ureteral wall and surrounding tissues. This effect has become an important consideration with the advent of high-powered lasers. We therefore evaluated the effect of laser settings and irrigation flow on ureteral temperature in an in vitro setting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To mimic ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy, we simulated clinically relevant irrigation flow rates and fired a Holmium:Yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser while monitoring "intraureteral" temperature. The probe tip of a thermometer was placed 1 mm from the tip of a 200 µm laser fiber, which was fired for 60 seconds at 0.2 J/50 Hz, 0.6 J/6 Hz, 0.8 J/8 Hz, 1 J/10 Hz, and 1 J/20 Hz within a tubing system that allowed for specified room temperature flow rates (100, 50, and 0 mL/minute). We recorded temperatures every 5 seconds. The maximum temperature was noted, and each laser/flow trial was duplicated. Averaged maximum temperatures were compared using analysis of variance across irrigation settings. RESULTS: At 100 cc/minute, only the 1 J/20 Hz laser setting produced a significantly higher maximum temperature (p < 0.01), although this finding was not clinically significant at a maximum of 30.7°C. At a lower irrigation rate of 50 cc/minute, the 1 J/20 Hz setting was again the only significantly higher maximum temperature (p < 0.05), although this temperature crossed the toxic threshold at a maximum of 43.4°C. With no flow, all maximum temperatures reached over 43°C, with 0.8 J/8 Hz, 1 J/10 Hz, and 1 J/20 Hz each statistically higher than the lower-energy settings (p < 0.05). The maximum temperature at 1 J/20 Hz with no irrigation was over 100°C. CONCLUSIONS: Despite increasing laser settings, adequate irrigation can maintain relatively stable temperatures within an in vitro ureteral system. As irrigation rates decrease, even lower power laser settings produce a clinically significant increase in maximum temperature, potentially causing ureteral tissue injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171115
[Lr] Last revision date:171115
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1089/end.2017.0658

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[PMID]: 29037128
[Au] Autor:Sahlén K; Dahlman P; Brekkan E; Lönnemark M; Sahlén G; Segelsjö M; Magnusson A
[Ad] Address:a Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Radiology , Uppsala University Hospital , Uppsala , Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Predictive value of secondary signs of obstruction in follow-up computed tomography of ureteral stones: a study with dynamic computed tomography.
[So] Source:Scand J Urol;:1-6, 2017 Oct 16.
[Is] ISSN:2168-1813
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the ratio of obstruction and predictive values of secondary signs in follow-up computed tomography (CT) of ureterolithiasis patients; to correlate stone characteristics with obstruction; to compare enhancement of obstructed and non-obstructed kidneys; and to compare radiation dose of the dynamic CT protocol to an excretory-phase protocol. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study assessed 49 follow-up CT scans of patients with remaining ureterolithiasis after a renal colic episode. Obstruction was measured as time taken to excretion of contrast medium in dynamic CT. Degree of secondary signs of obstruction was evaluated from the unenhanced CT. Data were collected on patients' gender and age, stone size and location, time from renal colic to follow-up, attenuation of the renal cortex and radiation dose. RESULTS: Obstruction was present in 28% (n = 14) at follow-up. Predictive values (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value) were calculated for hydronephrosis (1.0, 0.63, 0.52, 1.0), hydroureter (1.0, 0.4, 0.4, 1.0), perirenal stranding (0.21, 0.94, 0.6, 0.75), Gerota's fascia (0.21, 0.97, 0.75, 0.76) and renal swelling (0.21, 0.97, 0.75, 0.76). Obstruction was not correlated with stone characteristics. Enhancement was lower in obstructed kidneys (p < 0.01). Radiation dose was reduced by 43% (1.8 mSv). CONCLUSIONS: Obstruction was found in 28% of patients. Secondary signs were scarce and of indeterminate value to the diagnosis of obstruction. The absence of hydronephrosis and hydroureter contradicted obstruction. Stone characteristics were not correlated with obstruction. Enhancement of the renal cortex was lower in obstructed kidneys. The dynamic protocol reduced the radiation dose.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171017
[Lr] Last revision date:171017
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/21681805.2017.1386232

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[PMID]: 28992905
[Au] Autor:Vedrine B
[Ad] Address:Clinique Vétérinaire Seinevet-5, Place Cauchoise, 76000 Rouen, France. Electronic address: bvedrine@yahoo.f.
[Ti] Title:Perioperative Occlusion of a Subcutaneous Ureteral Bypass Secondary to a Severe Pyonephrosis in a Birman Cat.
[So] Source:Top Companion Anim Med;32(2):58-60, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1946-9837
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) was placed in a 10-year-old Birman cat for management of unilateral ureterolithiasis. Perioperative occlusion of the nephrostomy tube of the SUB device happened secondary to a severe pyonephrosis. Flushing of the system throught the subcutaneous shunting port was made with saline solution after clamping the urinary bladder catheter. Repetitive flushing of the device was performed daily for 3 days to be sure of the remanent patency of the catheter. Repetitive flushing of the SUB device is a successful renal-sparing treatment for pyonephrosis in a cat and may be considered as an effective treatment option for this condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171010
[Lr] Last revision date:171010
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28853105
[Au] Autor:Ansari H; Akhavan Sepahi A; Akhavan Sepahi M
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Islamic Azad University of Pharmaceutical Sciences Branch, Tehran, Iran. hani.ai.a7@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Different Approaches to Detect "Nanobacteria" in Patients with Kidney Stones: an Infectious Cause or a Subset of Life?
[So] Source:Urol J;14(5):5001-5007, 2017 Aug 29.
[Is] ISSN:1735-546X
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This research focused on the detection of nanobacteria in kidney stones of 30 Iranian patients without adding fetal bovine serum (FBS) to the culture media. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nanobacteria were isolated from a nephro-ureterolithiasis extract of the urinary tract and kidney of patients and were cultured in the laboratory. The growth of nanobacteria was monitored using a spectrophotometer, and with inverted microscopy technique, their crystallization was analyzed after two days. The images from atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the morphology and demonstrated the size of the cultured nanobacteria which is between 60 and 160 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the chemical composition, surface functional groups and crystal structure of the igloo-like nanobacteria shell. FTIR spectra in theregion of 1000 to 1200 cm-1 and the XRD peaks provided evidence that the main components of the nanobacteria shell were apatite-based compounds. RESULTS: Nanobacteria infected all the 27 patients with apatite kidney stone, and none of the three patients who had uric acid kidney stone were infected as confirmed by the cultivation of the stones samples. The results showed that nanobacteria might play a fundamental role in the formation of apatite-based kidney stones. CONCLUSION: The biomineralization ability of nanobacteria may lead to calcification of the soft tissues, which in turn may result in other diseases. It is also suggested that nanobacteria may be a factor in calcification-related diseases and disorders with poorly characterized etiologies. This research with its different approaches, clarified significant doubts that nanobacteria act as contaminant, warranting continued investigation of its role in other diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170830
[Lr] Last revision date:170830
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28845938
[Au] Autor:Dutov VV; Bazaev VV; Mamedov EA; Urenkov SB; Podoinitsyn AA
[Ad] Address:M.F. Vladimirsky Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Questions of terminology, systematization and grading of complications of contact ureteral lithotripsy].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(3):46-53, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the current variants of systematization and grading of complications of contact ureteral lithotripsy (CULT) and develop a working classification of CULT complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study analyzed results of 545 fluoroscopy-guided endoscopic procedures performed at the MRRCI Clinic of Urology from 2008 to 2015 in 506 patients with ureterolithiasis. RESULTS: The proposed and implemented classification and terminology of CULT complications unifies the diagnostic and management algorithm. This tool is more systematic and structured than the classical classification and universal methods of systematization and grading of CULT complications (classifying CULT complications in "major" and "minor", PULS scale, Satava and Clavien-Dindo grading systems). Given the lack of clear grading of ureteral rupture, it was divided into amputation (two-level rupture) and avulsion (one-level rupture). Using such term as extravasation of the contrast media and/or migration of the stone outside of the ureter is groundless because these complications occur only after the perforation of the ureteral wall. Therefore, these conditions are complications not of CULT, but of the ureteral wall perforation. The ureteral perforation was classified into macro- and micro-perforation. CONCLUSION: The existing terminology, classification and grading of the CULT complications should undergo a more detailed analysis. None of the existing classifications of CULT complications afford them to be fully staged and systematized. The working classification of complications of CULT developed at the M.F. Vladimirsky MRRCI Clinic of Urology warrants a multi-center prospective study to validate it and investigate its effectiveness.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lithotripsy/adverse effects
Postoperative Complications/classification
Rupture/etiology
Terminology as Topic
Ureter/injuries
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Humans
Middle Aged
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170829
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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