Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Urinary and Retention [Words]
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[PMID]: 29524246
[Au] Autor:Jones ML; Dominguez BJ; Deveau MA
[Ad] Address:Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College Station, Texas.
[Ti] Title:An experimental model for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.
[So] Source:J Vet Intern Med;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1676
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Calcium carbonate is a common urolith type in small ruminants with no high-yield experimental model to evaluate animal susceptibility or preventative measure response. HYPOTHESIS: That novel plastic winged implants would allow accumulation and quantification of calcium carbonate calculus formation in goats on a high-calcium diet and identify individual variation between goats in the mass of calculi produced. ANIMALS: Eight nonpregnant 3- and 4-year-old Boer-cross does, weighing 22.3-39.5 kg, determined to be healthy based on physical examination, were used in these experiments. METHODS: Prospective cohort study for in vivo experimental model development. Implants were placed into the urinary bladder lumen in 8 goats over 2 evaluation periods. The alfalfa-based ration had a total ration Ca : P of 3.29 and 3.84 : 1, respectively. Urine was collected at 0, 28, 56, and 84 days in the 1st experiment; blood and urine at those timepoints in the 2nd experiment. For each evaluation period, the implants were removed 84 days after implantation and weighed. Accumulated calculi mass was calculated and compared between goats and was analyzed for composition. RESULTS: Implant retention was 100% and 86% in the 2 studies. All goats with retained implants accumulated calcium carbonate at a mean implant gain per day across studies ranging from 0.44 to 57.45 mg. Two goats accumulated (0.44-7.65 mg/day and 33.64 & 57.45 mg/day) significantly more urolith material than the cohort across both studies (P = .047). No routine analytes on blood or urine were found to be explanatory for the difference observed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: These findings form a basis for implant and diet selection for use in future studies of urolithiasis development and for studies regarding individual susceptibility to urolithiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jvim.15061

  2 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522293
[Au] Autor:Prattley S; Voss J; Cheung S; Geraghty R; Jones P; Somani BK
[Ad] Address:University Hospital Southampton, NHS Trust, United Kingdom, UK.
[Ti] Title:Ureteroscopy and stone treatment in the elderly (≥70 years): prospective outcomes over 5- years with a review of literature.
[So] Source:Int Braz J Urol;44, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1677-6119
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes of ureteroscopy for treatment of stone disease in the elderly. Ureteroscopy (URS) is an increasingly popular treatment modality for urolithiasis and its applications are ever expanding with the development of newer technologies. Its feasibility and outcomes within the elderly population to our knowledge remain under-reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the patient demographics and surgical outcomes from our prospective database for patients ≥70 years who underwent URS for urolithiasis, in a 5-year period between March 2012 and December 2016. RESULTS: A total of 110 consecutive patients underwent 121 procedures (1.1 procedure/ patient) with a mean age of 77.2 years (range: 70-91 years). Stone location was in the kidney/ pelviureteric junction (PUJ) in 29%, ureter in 37% and in multiple locations in 34%. The initial and final stone free rate (SFR) was 88% and 97% respectively. While 73% were done as true day case procedures, 89% patients were discharged within 24 hours. Eleven patients (9%) underwent complications of which 10 were Clavien I/II including acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, stent symptoms and pneumonia. One patient underwent Clavien IV complication where they needed intensive care unit admission for urosepsis but fully recovered and were discharged home subsequently. CONCLUSION: Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective method of managing urolithiasis in elderly patients. Although most patients are discharged within 24-hours, consideration needs to be made for patients where social circumstances can impact their discharge planning.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0516

  3 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521882
[Au] Autor:Funayama M; Takata T; Koreki A; Ogino S; Mimura M
[Ti] Title:Catatonic Stupor in Schizophrenic Disorders and Subsequent Medical Complications and Mortality.
[So] Source:Psychosom Med;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1534-7796
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Although catatonia can occur secondary to a general medical condition, catatonia itself has been known to lead to various medical compolications. Although case reports on the association of catatonia with subsequent medical complications have been documented, no comprehensive large-scale study has been performed. To investigate specific medical complications following catatonia, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of specific medical complications of schizophrenia patients with catatonia. METHODS: The 1719 schizophrenia inpatients in our study were categorized into two groups: the catatonia group, i.e., those who exhibited catatonic stupor while they were hospitalized, and the non-catatonia group, which were those who never exhibited catatonic stupor. 'Differences between the two groups in the occurrence of subsequent medical complications were examined using linear and logistic regression analyses, and models were adjusted for potentially confounding factors.' RESULTS: The catatonia group had an increased risk for mortality (OR=4.8, 95% CI 2.0 to 10.6, P<0.01) and certain specific medical complications, i.e., pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, rhabdomyolysis, dehydration, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, urinary retention, decubitus, arrhythmia, renal failure, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, hypernatremia, and liver dysfunction (all P < 0.01, except for deep venous thrombosis, P =0.04) in the multiple linear regression analysis). CONCLUSIONS: Catatonic stupor in schizophrenia substantially raises the risk for specific medical complications and mortality. Hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, dehydration, and immobility, which are frequently involved in catatonia, might contribute to these specific medical complications. In catatonia, meticulous care for both mental and medical conditions should be taken to reduce the risk of adverse medical consequences.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PSY.0000000000000574

  4 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521831
[Au] Autor:Bellio G; Pasquali A; Schiano di Visconte M
[Ad] Address:Colorectal and Pelvic Floor Diseases Center, Department of General Surgery, S. Maria dei Battuti Hospital, Conegliano Veneto, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy: Results at 10-Year Follow-up.
[So] Source:Dis Colon Rectum;61(4):491-498, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0358
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite the advantages of stapled hemorrhoidopexy reported in the literature in terms of postoperative pain, hospital stay, and duration of convalescence, it was described to have a higher recurrence rate compared with conventional hemorrhoidectomy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction after stapled hemorrhoidopexy at 10-year follow-up. DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort analysis conducted on prospectively collected data. SETTINGS: The study was conducted at a single tertiary care center. PATIENTS: Eighty-six consecutive patients treated with stapled hemorrhoidopexy for grade 3 hemorrhoidal prolapse between January and December 2006 were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients satisfaction and recurrence rates were measured. RESULTS: Eighty-six patients (45 men and 41 women; median age, 49 y (range, 31-74 y)) underwent stapled hemorrhoidopexy. Eight patients had urinary retention during the immediate postoperative period, and 2 patients required a reoperation for suture line bleeding. The median hospital stay was 12 hours (range, 12-96 h). No suture line dehiscence, rectovaginal fistula, pelvic sepsis, anal abscess, or anal stenosis was recorded during the follow-up. Seventy-seven patients (90%) completed the expected follow-up, with a median duration of 119.0 months (range 115.4-121.8 mo). Among them, 30 patients (39%) experienced a recurrent hemorrhoidal prolapse, 8 of whom needed a reoperation. Thirty-four patients (44%) reported urge to defecate with a median visual analog scale of 1 (range, 1-7). Six patients (8%) reported gas leakage at the last follow-up visit, whereas no liquid or solid stool leakage was recorded. Satisfaction rate at 10-year follow-up was 68%. LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by its small sample size and lack of a control group. CONCLUSIONS: The high recurrence rate and low patient satisfaction rate showed that stapled hemorrhoidopexy reduces its efficacy in the long-term. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A510.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/DCR.0000000000001025

  5 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29417257
[Au] Autor:Choi SY; Ryu J; You D; Jeong IG; Hong JH; Ahn H; Kim CS
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Oncological effect of palliative transurethral resection of the prostate in patients with advanced prostate cancer: a propensity score matching study.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Clin Oncol;144(4):751-758, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1335
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: We investigated the oncologic effect of palliative transurethral resection of the prostate (pTURP) in patients with prostate cancer who received primary androgen deprivation therapy. METHODS: We reviewed 614 patients, including 83 who underwent pTURP; those with incidental prostate cancer were excluded. Patients were divided into the TURP group and non-TURP group. Propensity score matching was performed for comorbidity, initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA), TNM stage, and Gleason score (GS). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to confirm castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Cox regression was performed to confirm factors affecting CSS. RESULTS: Before matching, the TURP group had a worse TNM stage (p < 0.01) and GS (p = 0.028) and larger prostate volume (50.1 vs. 39.0 cc, p = 0.005) than the non-TURP group. The most common reason for pTURP was acute urinary retention. After matching, the TURP group showed worse outcomes in CRPC (p = 0.003), CSS (p = 0.003), and OS (p = 0.026). In multivariate analysis, factors for predicting CSS were a positive core percent [hazard ratio (HR) 1.015, p = 0.0272], GS (10 vs. ≤8; HR 6.716, p = 0.0008), and TURP within 3 months after biopsy (HR 2.543, p = 0.0482). The resection weight (HR 1.000, p = 0.9730), resection time (HR 1.000, p = 0.3670), and blood transfusion (HR 0.630, p = 0.1860) were not associated with CSS. CONCLUSIONS: The oncologic effect of pTURP as cytoreductive operation seems to be limited. Patients who had to receive pTURP due to cancer-related symptoms, especially early necessity of pTURP (within 3 months after biopsy), showed worse clinical courses; therefore, they should be treated more carefully and actively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00432-018-2597-5

  6 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390094
[Au] Autor:Jennings JS; Meyer BE; Guiroy PJ; Cole NA
[Ad] Address:Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Amarillo, TX.
[Ti] Title:Energy costs of feeding excess protein from corn-based by-products to finishing cattle.
[So] Source:J Anim Sci;96(2):653-669, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1525-3163
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The increased use of by-products in finishing diets for cattle leads to diets that contain greater concentrations of crude protein (CP) and metabolizable protein (MP) than required. The hypothesis was that excess dietary CP and MP would increase maintenance energy requirements because of the energy costs of removing excess N as urea in urine. To evaluate the potential efficiency lost, two experiments were performed to determine the effects of feeding excess CP and MP to calves fed a finishing diet at 1 × maintenance energy intake (Exp. 1) and at 2 × maintenance intake (Exp. 2). In each experiment, eight crossbred Angus-based steers were assigned to two dietary treatments in a switchback design with three periods. Treatments were steam-flaked corn-based finishing diets with two dietary protein concentrations, 13.8% CP/9.63% MP (CON) or 19.5% CP/14.14% MP (dry matter basis; ECP), containing corn gluten meal to reflect a diet with excess CP and MP from corn by-products. Each period was 27 d in length with a 19-d dietary adaptation period in outdoor individual pens followed by a 4-d sample collection in one of four open circuit respiration chambers, 2-d fast in outdoor pen, and 2-d fast in one of four respiration chambers. Energy metabolism, diet digestibility, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) balance, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide and methane production were measured. At both levels of intake, digestible energy as a proportion of gross energy (GE) tended to be greater (P < 0.06) in ECP than in CON steers. Metabolizable energy (ME) as a proportion of GE tended to be greater (P = 0.08) in the ECP steers than in the CON steers at 2 × maintenance intake. At 1 × and 2 × maintenance intake, urinary N excretion (g/d) was greater (P < 0.01) in the ECP steers than the CON steers. Heat production as a proportion of ME intake at 1 × maintenance tended (P = 0.06) to be greater for CON than for ECP (90.9% vs. 87.0% for CON and ECP, respectively); however, at 2 × maintenance energy intake, it was not different (63.9% vs. 63.8%, respectively). At 1 × maintenance intake, fasting heat production (FHP) was similar (P = 0.45) for both treatments, whereas at 2 × maintenance intake, FHP tended to be greater (P = 0.09) by 6% in ECP than in CON steers. Maintenance energy requirements estimated from linear and quadratic regression of energy retention on ME intake were 4% to 6% greater for ECP than for CON. Results of these studies suggest that feeding excess CP and MP from a protein source that is high in ruminally undegradable protein and low in protein quality will increase maintenance energy requirements of finishing steers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/jas/sky021

  7 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29385486
[Au] Autor:Lindblom SC; Gabler NK; Kerr BJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.
[Ti] Title:Influence of feeding thermally peroxidized soybean oil on growth performance, digestibility, and gut integrity in growing pigs.
[So] Source:J Anim Sci;96(2):558-569, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1525-3163
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Consumption of highly peroxidized oils has been shown to affect pig performance and oxidative status through the development of compounds which differ according to how oils are thermally processed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of feeding varying degrees of peroxidized soybean oil (SO) on parameters of growth performance; lipid, N, and GE digestibility, gut integrity in growing pigs, and plasma Trp. Fifty-six barrows (25.3 ± 3.3 kg initial BW) were randomly assigned to one of four diets containing either 10% fresh SO (22.5 °C) or thermally processed SO (45 °C for 288 h, 90 °C for 72 h, or 180 °C for 6 h), each with an air infusion of 15 L/min. Peroxide values for the 22.5, 45, 90, and 180 °C processed SO were 2.0, 96, 145, and 4.0 mEq/kg, respectively; 2,4-decadienal values for 22.5, 45, 90, and 180 °C processed SO were 2.11,5.05, 547.62, and 323.57 mg/kg, respectively; and 4-hydroxynonenal concentrations of 0.05, 1.05, 39.46, and 25.71 mg/kg with increasing SO processing temperature. Pigs were individually housed and fed ad libitum for a 49 d period to determine the effects of SO peroxidation status on growth performance, including a metabolism period for assessing GE and N digestibility, and N retention. In vivo urinary lactulose to mannitol ratio was also assessed to evaluate potential changes in small intestinal integrity. Although there were no differences observed in ADFI (P = 0.19), ADG was decreased in pigs fed 90 °C SO diet (P = 0.01), while G:F was increased (P = 0.02) in pigs fed 45 °C SO diet compared to the other SO diets. Pigs fed the 90 °C processed SO had the lowest (P = 0.01) DE as a percentage of GE, whereas ME as a percentage of DE was lowest (P = 0.05) in pigs fed the 180 °C SO and 90 °C SO followed by 45 °C SO and fresh SO. Ether extract (EE) digestibility was lowest (P = 0.01) in pigs fed 90 °C SO followed by pigs fed 180 °C SO, 45 °C SO, and fresh SO. The percent of N retained was greatest (P = 0.01) in pigs fed fresh SO followed by pigs fed 45 °C SO, 180 °C SO, and 90 °C, respectively. There were no differences observed among SO treatments for urinary lactulose to mannitol ratio (P = 0.60). Pigs fed SO processed at 90 °C and 180 °C had lower concentrations (P < 0.01) of serum Trp compared to pigs fed the 22.5 °C and 45 °C SO treatments. The presence of lipid peroxidation products, namely several aldehydes, contained in the 90 °C SO diet reduced ADG, GE and EE digestibility, and N balance, but had no impact on gut permeability.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1093/jas/sky004

  8 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29332254
[Au] Autor:Freton L; Tondut L; Enderle I; Hascoet J; Manunta A; Peyronnet B
[Ad] Address:Service d'Urologie, CHU Rennes, Hôpital Pontchaillou, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35000, Rennes, France. lucas.freton@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of adjustable continence therapy periurethral balloons and artificial urinary sphincter in female patients with stress urinary incontinence due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency.
[So] Source:Int Urogynecol J;, 2018 Jan 13.
[Is] ISSN:1433-3023
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to compare the outcomes of the ACT® device with those of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) AMS 800 in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) due to sphincter deficiency in women. METHODS: All the women who underwent surgical treatment for SUI due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency from 2007 to 2017 were included in a single-center retrospective study. The primary endpoint was the functional outcome. Perioperative functional parameters of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients underwent an ACT® implantation and 36 an AUS implantation. Patients in the AUS group were younger (62.9 vs 70.4 years; p = 0.03) with less comorbidity (ASA Score = 3 in 12.1% vs 33.3%; p = 0.005). Operative time and hospital stay were shorter in the ACT® group (45.7 vs 206.1 min; p < 0.001; 1.7 vs 7 days; p < 0.001 respectively). There was a higher rate of intraoperative complications in the AUS group (47% vs 8%; p < 0.001) but the rates of postoperative complications were similar between both groups. The ACT® was associated with an increased risk of urinary retention (20% vs 2.8%; p = 0.04). Results were in favor of AUS for: decrease in USP stress incontinence subscore (-7.6 vs -3.2; p < 0.001), number of pads per 24 h (- 4.6 vs -2.3; p = 0.002), PGII scale (PGII = 1: 61.1% vs 12%; p < 0.001), and cure rate (71.4% vs 21.7%; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In the present series, keeping in mind the significantly different baseline characteristics, AUS implantation was associated with better functional outcomes than the ACT® in female patients with SUI due to intrinsic sphincter deficiency, but with a higher intraoperative complications rate, longer operative time, and a longer stay.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00192-017-3544-8

  9 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516944
[Au] Autor:Mallya V; Mallya A; Gayathri J
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Medical College, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India.
[Ti] Title:Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra with inguinal lymph node metastases: A rare case report and review of literature.
[So] Source:J Cancer Res Ther;14(2):468-470, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1998-4138
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Urethral cancer is a rare malignancy with urothelial subtype being the most common followed by adenocarcinoma. In women, the usual presentation is urinary retention and hematuria. Clear cell variety of adenocarcinoma is a rarer entity which usually has a better prognosis than other variants. Lymph node metastasis is seen in about 30% of urethral cancers. Histopathological differential diagnosis includes Skene gland carcinoma and nephrogenic adenoma. Herein, we present a 58-year-old female patient who presented for evaluation of lymph node mass in the inguinal region. The detailed evaluation revealed clear cell adenocarcinoma of the urethra as the primary with lymph node metastasis.
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1482.226734

  10 / 14026 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29516310
[Au] Autor:Brouwer TA; van den Boogaard C; van Roon EN; Kalkman CJ; Veeger N
[Ad] Address:Department of Anaesthesiology, Medical Center Leeuwarden, Henri Dunantweg 2, PO Box 888, 8901 BR, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. t.brouwer@znb.nl.
[Ti] Title:Non-invasive bladder volume measurement for the prevention of postoperative urinary retention: validation of two ultrasound devices in a clinical setting.
[So] Source:J Clin Monit Comput;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2614
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ultrasound scanning of bladder volume is used for prevention of postoperative urinary retention (POUR). Accurate assessment of bladder volume is needed to allow clinical decision-making regarding the need for postoperative catheterization. Two commonly used ultrasound devices, the BladderScan® BVI 9400 and the newly released Prime® (Verathon Medical®, Bothell, WA, USA), with or without the 'pre-scan' option, have not been validated in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of these devices in daily clinical practice. Between June and September 2016 a prospective observational study was conducted in 318 surgical patients (18 years or older) who needed a urinary catheter perioperatively for clinical reasons. For acceptable performance, we required that the volume as estimated by the BladderScan® differs by no more than 5% from the actual urine volume after catheterization. The Schuirmann's two one-sided test was performed to assess equivalence between the BladderScan® estimate and catheterization. The BVI 9400® overestimated the actual bladder volume by + 17.5% (95% CI + 8.8 to + 26.3%). The Prime® without pre-scan underestimated by - 4.1% (95% CI - 8.8 to + 0.5%) and the Prime® with pre-scan underestimated by - 6.3% (95% CI - 11.6 to - 1.1%). This study shows that while both ultrasound devices were able to approximate current bladder volume, both BVI 9400® and Prime®-with and without pre-scan-were not able to measure the actual bladder volume within our predefined limit of ± 5%. Using the pre-scan feature of the Prime® did not further improve accuracy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10877-018-0123-6


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