Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Urinary and Tract and Infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29524549
[Au] Autor:Rajivgandhi G; Vijayan R; Maruthupandy M; Vaseeharan B; Manoharan N
[Ad] Address:Department of Marine Science, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Antibiofilm effect of Nocardiopsis sp. GRG 1 (KT235640) compound against biofilm forming Gram negative bacteria on UTIs.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a diverse public health complication and are caused by range of pathogens, however most often by Gram negative bacteria which cause significant life threatening risks to different populations. The prevalence rate and antimicrobial resistance among the Gram negative uropathogens alarmed to significantly heighten the economic burden of these infections. In this study, we investigated the role of Pyrrolo[1,2-a] pyrazine-1,4-dione,hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl) on endophytic actinomycetes Nocardiopsis sp. GRG 1 (KT235640) exhibit the antibiofilm effect against P. mirabilis and E. coli and it was characterized through activity guided techniques using TLC, HPLC, GC-MS, LC-MS and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compound, Pyrrolo [1, 2-a] pyrazine-1, 4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl) inhibits P. mirabilis biofilm formation as well as reduce the viability of preformed biofilms. Furthermore, CLSM image show the, cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell membrane and loss of viability with cell membrane damage. The SEM result confirms that the cell wall degradation against virulent of biofilm forming bacteria. Hence, the Pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl) is active against P. mirabilis and E. coli.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29506511
[Au] Autor:Seibt S; Gilchrist CA; Reed PW; Best EJ; Harnden A; Camargo CA; Grant CC
[Ad] Address:Paediatrics, Taranaki Base Hospital, New Plymouth, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Hospital readmissions with acute infectious diseases in New Zealand children < 2 years of age.
[So] Source:BMC Pediatr;18(1):98, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases are the leading cause of hospital admissions in young children. Hospitalisation with an infectious disease is a recurrent event for some children. Our objective was to describe risk factors for infectious disease readmission following hospital admission with an infectious disease in the first two years of life. METHODS: We performed a national cohort study of New Zealand children, born 2005-2009, with an infectious disease admission before age 24 months. Children readmitted with an infectious disease within 12 months of the first infectious disease admission were identified. Every infectious disease admission was categorised as a respiratory, enteric, skin and soft tissue, urinary or other infection. Independent associations of demographic and child health factors with infectious disease readmission were determined using multiple variable logistic regression. RESULTS: From 2005 to 2011, there were 69,902 infectious disease admissions for 46,657 children less than two years old. Of these 46,657 children, 10,205 (22%) had at least one infectious disease readmission within 12 months of their first admission. The first infectious disease admission was respiratory (54%), enteric (15%), skin or soft tissue (7%), urinary (4%) or other (20%). Risk of infectious disease readmission was increased if the first infectious disease admission was respiratory (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.78-1.95) but not if it was in any other infectious disease category. Risk factors for respiratory infectious disease readmission were male gender, Pacific or Maori ethnicity, greater household deprivation, presence of a complex chronic condition, or a first respiratory infectious disease admission during autumn or of ≥3 days duration. Fewer factors (younger age, male gender, presence of a complex chronic condition) were associated with enteric infection readmission. The presence of a complex chronic condition was the only factor associated with urinary tract infection readmission and none of the factors were associated with skin or soft tissue infection readmission. CONCLUSIONS: In children less than two years old, infectious disease readmission risk is increased if the first infectious disease admission is a respiratory infectious disease but not if it is another infectious disease category. Risk factors for respiratory infectious disease readmission are different from those for other infectious disease readmissions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12887-018-1079-x

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[PMID]: 29482936
[Au] Autor:Amundsen CL; Komesu YM; Chermansky C; Gregory WT; Myers DL; Honeycutt EF; Vasavada SP; Nguyen JN; Wilson TS; Harvie HS; Wallace D; Pelvic Floor Disorders Network
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Electronic address: cindy.amundsen@duke.edu.
[Ti] Title:Two-Year Outcomes of Sacral Neuromodulation Versus OnabotulinumtoxinA for Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence: A Randomized Trial.
[So] Source:Eur Urol;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7560
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a chronic condition for which sacral neuromodulation (SNM) (InterStim/Medtronic) and onabotulinumtoxinA (BTX) (BotoxA/Allergan) are utilized. These therapies have not been compared over extended time. OBJECTIVE: To compare UUI episodes (UUIE) over 24 mo following SNM or BTX. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Multicenter, open-label, randomized, extension trial (February 2012-July 2016) at nine US medical centers involving 386 women with ≥6 UUIE over 3 d inadequately managed by medications. Participants were clinical responders to treatment: ≥50% reduction in UUIEs after SNM placement or 1 mo post BTX. INTERVENTION: SNM (n=194) versus 200 U BTX (n=192). SNM reprogrammings occurred throughout the 24 mo. After 6 mo, two additional BTX injections were allowed. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Primary outcome: change in mean daily UUIE over 24 mo. SECONDARY OUTCOMES: no UUIE, ≥75% and ≥50% UUIE reduction; Overactive Bladder Questionnaire Short Form; Urinary Distress Inventory short form; Incontinence Impact Questionnaire; Patient Global Impression of Improvement; Overactive Bladder Satisfaction of Treatment Questionnaire; and adverse events (AEs). Primary analysis used a linear mixed model. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Outcome data were available for 260/298 (87%) clinical responders. No difference in decreased mean UUIE was found over 24 mo (-3.88 vs -3.50 episodes/d,95% confidence interval [CI]=-0.14-0.89; p=0.15), with no differences in UUI resolution, ≥75% or ≥50% UUIE reduction. BTX group maintained higher satisfaction (mean difference=-9.14, 95% CI=-14.38--3.90; p<0.001), treatment endorsement (mean difference=-12.16, 95% CI=-17.7--6.63; p<0.001) through 24 mo. Other secondary measures did not differ. Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) were higher after BTX (24% vs 10%; p<0.01), 6% required intermittent catheterization post second injection. SNM revision and removals occurred in 3% and 9% patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Both treatments offered sustainable UUI improvement, and higher BTX dosing had low clean intermittent catheterization rates, but with UTI risk. SNM revision/removal rates were low due to standardized lead placement with strict treatment response definitions. PATIENT SUMMARY: We compared a large group of US women with severe urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) who received sacral neuromodulation (InterStim) or onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox A) therapy during a 2-yr period. We found that both therapies had similar success in reducing UUI symptoms, and adverse events were low. However, women in the BotoxA group had higher satisfaction and endorsement with their treatment, but with a higher chance of a urinary tract infection. We conclude that both therapies offer sustained reduction in daily incontinence over 2 yr.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524188
[Au] Autor:Dai X; Luo ZC; Zhai L; Zhao WP; Huang F
[Ad] Address:Department of Endocrinology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, 530021, Guangxi, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Adverse Drug Events Associated with Low-Dose (10 mg) Versus High-Dose (25 mg) Empagliflozin in Patients Treated for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.
[So] Source:Diabetes Ther;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1869-6953
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Empagliflozin is a new, emerging oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) which has shown significant benefits in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with cardiovascular disease. In this analysis, our aim was to systematically compare the adverse drug events (ADEs) associated with a low (10 mg) versus a high (25 mg) dose of empagliflozin as (1) monotherapy, (2) as an add-on to other OHAs, and (3) as an add-on specifically to metformin, in patients who were treated for T2DM. METHODS: This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that compared empagliflozin 10 mg versus 25 mg in patients who were treated for T2DM and which reported adverse drug reactions as their clinical endpoints. Statistical analysis was carried out using the latest version of the RevMan software (ver. 5.3) whereby odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were generated. RESULTS: Eight trials with a total number of 8514 patients treated for T2DM were included in this meta-analysis and systematic review, of whom 4261 patients received 10 mg empagliflozin and 4253 patients received 25 mg empagliflozin. Our results showed that there were no significant differences between the patients with T2DM receiving 10 empagliflozin and those receiving 25 mg empagliflozin in terms of drug-related adverse effects (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.93-1.21; P = 0.40, I = 0%), adverse events leading to drug discontinuation (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.86-1.14; P = 0.87, I = 0%), and serious adverse events (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.95-1.18; P = 0.31, I = 0%) when empagliflozin was provided as monotherapy or as an add-on to other anti-diabetic medications. The same results were obtained when empagliflozin was used as an add-on to metformin or as monotherapy. The duration of the follow-up periods did not affect the results. However, the incidence of genital and urinary tract infections (UTIs) was significantly higher in female patients than in male patients with 10 or 25 mg empagliflozin. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of ADEs was not significantly different in T2DM patients receiving 10 versus 25 mg empagliflozin as monotherapy or as add-on to metformin or other anti-diabetic drugs during a shorter or longer follow-up period. However, genital and UTIs were more common in female patients with T2DM irrespective of empagliflozin dosage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13300-018-0399-z

  5 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523611
[Au] Autor:Triplett KE; Murray R; Anstey M
[Ad] Address:Intensive Care, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Multifactorial non-cirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 51-year-old female presented with acute confusion associated with a non-specific headache and lethargy. The patient's history included bipolar disorder on valproate and recent travel to northern Vietnam. The patient was subsequently found to have hyperammonaemia as well as a urinary tract infection and bacteraemia with The patient was presumed to have a multifactorial non-cirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy due to a combination of a urinary tract infection and bacteraemia with , a urease-producing bacteria, and also valproate use, a medication known to interfere with ammonia elimination. The patient's treatment included supportive care, ceasing valproate, empiric then rationalised antibiotics, N-acetylcysteine and L-carnitine. We present a case of non-cirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy and explain why it is multifactorial in origin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523296
[Au] Autor:Gyftopoulos K
[Ad] Address:Department of Anatomy, University of Patras Medical School and Olympion Hospital, Patras, Greece. Electronic address: kogyftop@yahoo.gr.
[Ti] Title:The aberrant urethral meatus as a possible aetiological factor of recurrent post-coital urinary infections in young women.
[So] Source:Med Hypotheses;113:6-8, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2777
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTI) in women is a common cause of morbidity worldwide. In young women recurrent cystitis associated with sexual intercourse is quite common; however not all sexually active women will suffer a post-coital UTI episode. A variety of possible predisposing factors has been described, including behavioral risk patterns, genetic factors and increased virulence of certain subtypes of uropathogens. It has long been regarded that anatomical anomalies are rare in this setting of rUTIs. The shorter distance of the urethra to the anus has been the only anatomical risk factor described that is marginally significant in predisposing women for rUTIs. We hereby present a hypothesis that focuses on the shorter distance of the urethral meatus to the vaginal opening as the mainstay of sexually-induced rUTIs. In this theory of "functional hypospadias", the low misplacement of the urethral opening allows for easier advancement of pathogen-laden mucous by penile thrust and increased friction during intercourse. Our hypothesis suggests that a shorter distance of the urethral meatus to the vaginal opening (and not the anus itself) is an anatomical risk factor for recurrent post-coital cystitis. Verification of this hypothesis might lead to a more patient-oriented approach by alerting clinicians in looking for an aberrant meatus and save the patient from unnecessary imaging and endoscopic examinations often used in these cases. Moreover it may also aid the patient in understanding her anatomy and modify behavioral risk practices.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522784
[Au] Autor:Alves Braga I; Amaral de Campos P; Pinto Gontijo Filho P; Marques Ribas R
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Uberlândia, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Multi-Hospital Point Prevalence Study of Healthcare-Associated Infections in 28 Adult Intensive Care Units in Brazil.
[So] Source:J Hosp Infect;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2939
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Healthcare-associated infection (HAI) represents a major problem for patient safety worldwide. AIM: To provide an up-to-date picture of the extent, aetiology, risk factors and patterns of infections in intensive care units (ICUs) in 28 Brazilian hospitals of different sizes. METHODS: A one-day point prevalence survey in 2016 enrolled the ICU of hospitals from the 12 meso regions located in the State of Minas Gerais, Southeast region of Brazil. Hospitals were classified as university or non-university hospitals. All patients with >48h of admission to the study ICUs at the time of the survey were included. FINDINGS: We studied 303 patients, of whom 155 (51.2%) were infected; 123 (79.4%) of these had at least one ICU-acquired infection. The most frequent ICU-acquired infections were pneumonia (53.0%) and bloodstream infection (27.6%).119 bacterial isolates were cultured, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii 27.1%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27.1%, and Staphylococcus aureus 39.0%. According to type of infection, the commonest pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.4%) in pneumonia, coagulase-negative staphylococci (23.4%) and Enterobacteriaceae (23.4%) in bloodstream infections and Enterobacteriaceae in urinary tract infections. CONCLUSION: Our study found that the overall prevalence of ICU-acquired infections in surveyed Brazilian hospitals was higher than that reported in most European countries and the USA. A greater proportion of infections were caused by non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria. These observations, along with a high rate of antimicrobial use, illustrates the urgent need for HAIs to be a priority in the public health agenda of Brazil.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505534
[Au] Autor:Wu X; Yu C; Li T; Lin L; Xu Q; Zhu Q; Ye L; Gao X
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Fujian Provincial Hospital, Provincial Clinical College of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Obesity was an independent risk factor for febrile infection after prostate biopsy: A 10-year single center study in South China.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9549, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To detect the best antibiotic protocol for prostate biopsy and to assess the potential risk factors postbiopsy in Chinese patients.A total of 1526 patients underwent biopsy were assessed retrospectively. The effect of 3 antibiotic protocols was compared, including fluoroquinolone (FQ) monotherapy, third-generation cephalosporin combined with FQ and targeted antibiotics according to the prebiopsy rectal swab culture result. Postbiopsy infection (PBI) was defined as fever and/or active urinary tract symptoms such as dysuria or frequency with pyuria and/or leucocytosis, sepsis is defined as the presence of clinically or microbiologically documented infection in conjunction with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The relationship between infections and clinical characteristics of patients was assessed. Data were first picked out in univariate analysis and then enter multivariate logistic regression.Thirty-three (2.2%) patients developed febrile infection. The combination antibiotic prophylaxis could significantly decrease the rate of PBI than FQ monotherapy (1.0% vs 4.0%, P = .000). The infection rate of the targeted antibiotic group was 1.1%, but there was no significant statistic difference compared with FQ alone (P = .349). Escherichia coli was the most predominant pathogen causing infection. Rectal swab revealed as high as 47.1% and 36.0% patients harbored FQ resistant and ESBL-producing organisms, respectively. In univariate analysis, overweight (BMI between 25 and 28 kg/m), obesity (BMI > 28 kg/m), diabetes were picked out as potential risk factors. Obesity remained as risk factor (OR = 12.827, 95% CI: 0.983-8.925, P = .001) while overweight and diabetes were close to significance (P = .052, .053, respectively).The combined cephalosporin with FQ prophylaxis could significantly decrease the risk of infectious complications. Obesity was an independent risk factor for PBI.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Obesity/complications
Prostate/surgery
Prostatitis/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biopsy/adverse effects
Cephalosporins/therapeutic use
China
Fluoroquinolones/therapeutic use
Humans
Infection/etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatitis/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Cephalosporins); 0 (Fluoroquinolones)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009549

  9 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394218
[Au] Autor:Beeson T; Davis C
[Ad] Address:Terrie Beeson, MSN, RN, CCRN, ACNS-BC, Indiana University Health University Hospital, Indianapolis. Carmen Davis, MSN, RN, CCRN, CNS-BC, Indiana University Health University Hospital, Indianapolis.
[Ti] Title:Urinary Management With an External Female Collection Device.
[So] Source:J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs;45(2):187-189, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1528-3976
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Strategies to decrease use of female indwelling urinary catheters and catheter-associated urinary tract infections are challenging due to the limited availability of proper fitting external collection devices. Female urinary incontinence predisposes the skin to potential pain, itching, burning, infection, or pressure injuries. CASE STUDIES: This article discusses 3 patients' trajectory of care with use of an external female urinary collection device. All of these females were incontinent of urine after the indwelling urinary catheter was removed and managed with an external female urinary collection device. CONCLUSIONS: The use of an external female urinary collection device is a feasible alternative to an indwelling urinary catheter as well as managing urinary incontinence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/WON.0000000000000417

  10 / 47509 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376609
[Au] Autor:Chubukova OA; Shkarin VV
[Ad] Address:Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy of Minzdrav of Russia, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Concomitant urogenital infections in men].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):126-130, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The article presents possible combinations of urogenital infections of various etiologies and some pathogenetic, clinical and epidemiological features, and issues of epidemiological surveillance for co-infection. The authors describe in detail combinations with each other and with other diseases of such pathogens as Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma spp., Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis. They also focus on the problem of co-occurrence of human papillomavirus (HPV) with other urogenital pathogens. The article raises the question of the need to introduce new scientific data on the epidemiology of concomitant urogenital infections in men in the practice of diagnosis, treatment, registration, and implementation of preventive and anti-epidemic measures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coinfection
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
Papillomavirus Infections
Urinary Tract Infections
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Coinfection/diagnosis
Coinfection/microbiology
Coinfection/therapy
Coinfection/virology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/diagnosis
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/microbiology
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/therapy
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/virology
Humans
Male
Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis
Papillomavirus Infections/microbiology
Papillomavirus Infections/therapy
Urinary Tract Infections/diagnosis
Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology
Urinary Tract Infections/therapy
Urinary Tract Infections/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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