Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Vagus and Nerve and Injuries [Words]
References found : 652 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 66 go to page                         

  1 / 652 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29181992
[Au] Autor:Aldoori J; Mahadevan V; Aldoori M
[Ad] Address:Huddersfield Royal Infirmary , Lindley, Huddersfield , UK.
[Ti] Title:The significance of the pharyngeal veins during carotid endarterectomy: description of an anatomical triangle.
[So] Source:Ann R Coll Surg Engl;100(2):125-128, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1478-7083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Injuries to the hypoglossal and vagus nerves are the most commonly reported injuries during carotid endarterectomy. While unilateral single nerve injury is usually well tolerated, bilateral or combined nerve injuries can pose a serious threat to life. This study aims to increase awareness of the inferior pharyngeal vein, which usually passes posterior to the internal carotid artery but sometimes crosses anterior to it. Injury to either or both hypoglossal and vagus nerves can occur during control of unexpected haemorrhage from the torn and retracted edges of the inferior pharyngeal vein. We recommend careful ligation and division of this vein. In addition, we observed in 9 (17.3%) of the 52 operations that the pharyngeal vein formed a triangle with the vagus and hypoglossal nerves when it passes anterior to the internal carotid artery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Endarterectomy, Carotid/adverse effects
Endarterectomy, Carotid/methods
Pharynx/anatomy & histology
Pharynx/blood supply
Veins/anatomy & histology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Carotid Arteries/anatomy & histology
Carotid Arteries/surgery
Humans
Hypoglossal Nerve Injuries/prevention & control
Vagus Nerve Injuries/prevention & control
Veins/injuries
Veins/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171129
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1308/rcsann.2017.0176

  2 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29187691
[Au] Autor:Fujiwara S; Yoshimura H; Nishiya K; Oshima K; Kawamoto M; Kohara N
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[Tapia's syndrome following transesophageal echocardiography during an open-heart operation: a case report].
[So] Source:Rinsho Shinkeigaku;57(12):785-787, 2017 Dec 27.
[Is] ISSN:1882-0654
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:A 67-year-old man presented with hoarseness, dysarthria and deviation of the tongue to the left side the day after the open-heart operation under general anesthesia. Brain MRI demonstrated no causal lesion, and laryngoscope showed left vocal cord abductor palsy, so we diagnosed him with Tapia's syndrome (i.e., concomitant paralysis of the left recurrent and hypoglossal nerve). His neurological symptoms recovered gradually and improved completely four months after the onset. Tapia's syndrome is a rare condition caused by the extra cranial lesion of the recurrent laryngeal branch of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nerve, and mostly described as a complication of tracheal intubation. In this case, transesophageal echo probe has been held in the left side of the pharynx, so compression to the posterior wall of pharynx by the probe resulted in this condition, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Tapia's syndrome due to transesophageal echocardiography during an open-heart operation. This rare syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis of dysarthria and tongue deviation after a procedure associated with compression to the pharynx.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Echocardiography, Transesophageal/adverse effects
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases/etiology
Intraoperative Complications/etiology
Vocal Cord Paralysis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Diagnosis, Differential
Dysarthria/etiology
Echocardiography, Transesophageal/instrumentation
Humans
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases/diagnosis
Male
Syndrome
Vocal Cord Paralysis/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5692/clinicalneurol.cn-001097

  3 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29190774
[Au] Autor:Chatterjee PK; Yeboah MM; Solanki MH; Kumar G; Xue X; Pavlov VA; Al-Abed Y; Metz CN
[Ad] Address:Center for Biomedical Sciences, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway by GTS-21 attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in mice.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(11):e0188797, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the most common side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy drug. Although AKI occurs in up to one third of cancer patients receiving cisplatin, effective renal protective strategies are lacking. Cisplatin targets renal proximal tubular epithelial cells leading to inflammation, reactive oxygen species, tubular cell injury, and eventually cell death. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is a vagus nerve-mediated reflex that suppresses inflammation via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs). Our previous studies demonstrated the renoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of cholinergic agonists, including GTS-21. Therefore, we examined the effect of GTS-21 on cisplatin-induced AKI. Male C57BL/6 mice received either saline or GTS-21 (4mg/kg, i.p.) twice daily for 4 days before cisplatin and treatment continued through euthanasia; 3 days post-cisplatin mice were euthanized and analyzed for markers of renal injury. GTS-21 significantly reduced cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and injury (p<0.05). GTS-21 significantly attenuated renal Ptgs2/COX-2 mRNA and IL-6, IL-1ß, and CXCL1 protein expression, as well as neutrophil infiltration after cisplatin. GTS-21 blunted cisplatin-induced renal ERK1/2 activation, as well as renal ATP depletion and apoptosis (p<0.05). GTS-21 suppressed the expression of CTR1, a cisplatin influx transporter and enhanced the expression of cisplatin efflux transporters MRP2, MRP4, and MRP6 (p<0.05). Using breast, colon, and lung cancer cell lines we showed that GTS-21 did not inhibit cisplatin's tumor cell killing activity. GTS-21 protects against cisplatin-AKI by attenuating renal inflammation, ATP depletion and apoptosis, as well as by decreasing renal cisplatin influx and increasing efflux, without impairing cisplatin-mediated tumor cell killing. Our results support further exploring the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway for preventing cisplatin-induced AKI.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control
Benzylidene Compounds/pharmacology
Cisplatin/adverse effects
Inflammation/prevention & control
Pyridines/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Benzylidene Compounds); 0 (Pyridines); 8S399XDN2K (3-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)anabaseine); Q20Q21Q62J (Cisplatin)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171226
[Lr] Last revision date:171226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188797

  4 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29158921
[Au] Autor:Frenkel A; Binyamin Y; Brotfain E; Koyfman L; Roy-Shapira A; Shelef I; Klein M
[Ad] Address:General Intensive Care Unit, Soroka University Medical Center and the Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
[Ti] Title:A Nearly Lethal Screw: An Unusual Cause of Recurrent Bradycardia and Asystole Episodes after Fixation of the Cervical Spine.
[So] Source:Case Rep Crit Care;2017:3748930, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2090-6420
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present a case of a 51-year-old man who was injured in a bicycle accident. His main injury was an unstable fracture of the cervical and thoracic vertebral column. Several hours after his arrival to the hospital the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the cervical and thoracic spine. The patient was hospitalized in our critical care unit for 99 days. During this time patient had several episodes of severe bradycardia and asystole; some were short with spontaneous return to sinus and some required pharmacological treatment and even Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Initially, these episodes were attributed to the high cervical spine injury, but, later on, CT scan suggested that a fixation screw abutted on the esophagus and activated the vagus nerve by direct pressure. After repositioning of the cervical fixation, the bradycardia and asystole episodes were no longer observed and the patient was released to a rehabilitation ward. This case is presented in order to alert practitioners to the possibility that, after operative fixation of cervical spine injuries, recurrent episodes of bradyarrhythmia can be caused by incorrect placement of the fixation screws and might be confused with the natural history of the high cervical cord injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171123
[Lr] Last revision date:171123
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/3748930

  5 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29078572
[Au] Autor:Wong I; Tong DKH; Tsang RKY; Wong CLY; Chan DKK; Chan FSY; Law S
[Ad] Address:Division of Esophageal and Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China.
[Ti] Title:Continuous intraoperative vagus nerve stimulation for monitoring of recurrent laryngeal nerve during minimally invasive esophagectomy.
[So] Source:J Vis Surg;3:9, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2221-2965
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:For squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, extended mediastinal lymphadenectomy especially around the bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) is associated with high risk of nerve injury. This does not only result in hoarseness of voice, increase the chance of pulmonary complications, but would also affect the quality of life of patients in the long term. Methods to improve safety of lymphadenectomy are desirable. Continuous intraoperative nerve monitoring (CIONM) based on a system using vagus nerve stimulation was tested. In thyroidectomy, this system has been shown to be useful. Our patient cohort was unselected, with the intent to perform bilateral RLN dissection undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) esophagectomy. Intermittent nerve stimulation for mapping and CIONM were employed to monitor left RLN nodal dissection, while only intermittent stimulation was used for the right RLN. CIONM has the potential to aid RLN dissection. The learning curves for the placement technique of CIONM, the threshold level and the interpretation of myographic amplitude and latency have been overcome. With the availability of nerve mapping and CIONM, more aggressive and thorough nodal dissection may be possible with less fear of RLN injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171031
[Lr] Last revision date:171031
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21037/jovs.2016.12.11

  6 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
Texto completo

[PMID]: 28718878
[Au] Autor:Sprengers M; Vonck K; Carrette E; Marson AG; Boon P
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, 1K12, 185 De Pintelaan, Ghent, Belgium, B-9000.
[Ti] Title:Deep brain and cortical stimulation for epilepsy.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;7:CD008497, 2017 07 18.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite optimal medical treatment, including epilepsy surgery, many epilepsy patients have uncontrolled seizures. Since the 1970s interest has grown in invasive intracranial neurostimulation as a treatment for these patients. Intracranial stimulation includes both deep brain stimulation (DBS) (stimulation through depth electrodes) and cortical stimulation (subdural electrodes). This is an updated version of a previous Cochrane review published in 2014. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of DBS and cortical stimulation for refractory epilepsy based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register on 29 September 2015, but it was not necessary to update this search, because records in the Specialized Register are included in CENTRAL. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 11, 5 November 2016), PubMed (5 November 2016), ClinicalTrials.gov (5 November 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP (5 November 2016) and reference lists of retrieved articles. We also contacted device manufacturers and other researchers in the field. No language restrictions were imposed. SELECTION CRITERIA: RCTs comparing deep brain or cortical stimulation versus sham stimulation, resective surgery, further treatment with antiepileptic drugs or other neurostimulation treatments (including vagus nerve stimulation). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Four review authors independently selected trials for inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted the relevant data and assessed trial quality and overall quality of evidence. The outcomes investigated were seizure freedom, responder rate, percentage seizure frequency reduction, adverse events, neuropsychological outcome and quality of life. If additional data were needed, the study investigators were contacted. Results were analysed and reported separately for different intracranial targets for reasons of clinical heterogeneity. MAIN RESULTS: Twelve RCTs were identified, eleven of these compared one to three months of intracranial neurostimulation with sham stimulation. One trial was on anterior thalamic DBS (n = 109; 109 treatment periods); two trials on centromedian thalamic DBS (n = 20; 40 treatment periods), but only one of the trials (n = 7; 14 treatment periods) reported sufficient information for inclusion in the quantitative meta-analysis; three trials on cerebellar stimulation (n = 22; 39 treatment periods); three trials on hippocampal DBS (n = 15; 21 treatment periods); one trial on nucleus accumbens DBS (n = 4; 8 treatment periods); and one trial on responsive ictal onset zone stimulation (n = 191; 191 treatment periods). In addition, one small RCT (n = 6) compared six months of hippocampal DBS versus sham stimulation. Evidence of selective reporting was present in four trials and the possibility of a carryover effect complicating interpretation of the results could not be excluded in five cross-over trials without any or a sufficient washout period. Moderate-quality evidence could not demonstrate statistically or clinically significant changes in the proportion of patients who were seizure-free or experienced a 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency (primary outcome measures) after one to three months of anterior thalamic DBS in (multi)focal epilepsy, responsive ictal onset zone stimulation in (multi)focal epilepsy patients and hippocampal DBS in (medial) temporal lobe epilepsy. However, a statistically significant reduction in seizure frequency was found for anterior thalamic DBS (mean difference (MD), -17.4% compared to sham stimulation; 95% confidence interval (CI) -31.2 to -1.0; high-quality evidence), responsive ictal onset zone stimulation (MD -24.9%; 95% CI -40.1 to -6.0; high-quality evidence) and hippocampal DBS (MD -28.1%; 95% CI -34.1 to -22.2; moderate-quality evidence). Both anterior thalamic DBS and responsive ictal onset zone stimulation do not have a clinically meaningful impact on quality life after three months of stimulation (high-quality evidence). Electrode implantation resulted in postoperative asymptomatic intracranial haemorrhage in 1.6% to 3.7% of the patients included in the two largest trials and 2.0% to 4.5% had postoperative soft tissue infections (9.4% to 12.7% after five years); no patient reported permanent symptomatic sequelae. Anterior thalamic DBS was associated with fewer epilepsy-associated injuries (7.4 versus 25.5%; P = 0.01) but higher rates of self-reported depression (14.8 versus 1.8%; P = 0.02) and subjective memory impairment (13.8 versus 1.8%; P = 0.03); there were no significant differences in formal neuropsychological testing results between the groups. Responsive ictal-onset zone stimulation seemed to be well-tolerated with few side effects.The limited number of patients preclude firm statements on safety and tolerability of hippocampal DBS. With regards to centromedian thalamic DBS, nucleus accumbens DBS and cerebellar stimulation, no statistically significant effects could be demonstrated but evidence is of only low to very low quality. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Except for one very small RCT, only short-term RCTs on intracranial neurostimulation for epilepsy are available. Compared to sham stimulation, one to three months of anterior thalamic DBS ((multi)focal epilepsy), responsive ictal onset zone stimulation ((multi)focal epilepsy) and hippocampal DBS (temporal lobe epilepsy) moderately reduce seizure frequency in refractory epilepsy patients. Anterior thalamic DBS is associated with higher rates of self-reported depression and subjective memory impairment. There is insufficient evidence to make firm conclusive statements on the efficacy and safety of hippocampal DBS, centromedian thalamic DBS, nucleus accumbens DBS and cerebellar stimulation. There is a need for more, large and well-designed RCTs to validate and optimize the efficacy and safety of invasive intracranial neurostimulation treatments.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Deep Brain Stimulation/methods
Epilepsy/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anterior Thalamic Nuclei
Cerebral Cortex
Deep Brain Stimulation/instrumentation
Electrodes, Implanted/adverse effects
Hippocampus
Humans
Mediodorsal Thalamic Nucleus
Nucleus Accumbens
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170912
[Lr] Last revision date:170912
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170719
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD008497.pub3

  7 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28527929
[Au] Autor:Kim GY; Lawrence PF; Moridzadeh RS; Zimmerman K; Munoz A; Luna-Ortiz K; Oderich GS; de Francisco J; Ospina J; Huertas S; de Souza LR; Bower TC; Farley S; Gelabert HA; Kret MR; Harris EJ; De Caridi G; Spinelli F; Smeds MR; Liapis CD; Kakisis J; Papapetrou AP; Debus ES; Behrendt CA; Kleinspehn E; Horton JD; Mussa FF; Cheng SWK; Morasch MD; Rasheed K; Bennett ME; Bismuth J; Lumsden AB; Abularrage CJ; Farber A
[Ad] Address:University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Mich; UCLA Health System, Los Angeles, Calif.
[Ti] Title:New predictors of complications in carotid body tumor resection.
[So] Source:J Vasc Surg;65(6):1673-1679, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6809
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationship between two new variables, tumor distance to base of skull (DTBOS) and tumor volume, with complications of carotid body tumor (CBT) resection, including bleeding and cranial nerve injury. METHODS: Patients who underwent CBT resection between 2004 and 2014 were studied using a standardized, multi-institutional database. Demographic, perioperative, and outcomes data were collected. CBT measurements were determined from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound examination. RESULTS: There were 356 CBTs resected in 332 patients (mean age, 51 years; 72% female); 32% were classified as Shamblin I, 43% as Shamblin II, and 23% as Shamblin III. The mean DTBOS was 3.3 cm (standard deviation [SD], 2.1; range, 0-10), and the mean tumor volume was 209.7 cm (SD, 266.7; range, 1.1-1642.0 cm ). The mean estimated blood loss (EBL) was 257 mL (SD, 426; range, 0-3500 mL). Twenty-four percent of patients had cranial nerve injuries. The most common cranial nerves injured were the hypoglossal (10%), vagus (11%), and superior laryngeal (5%) nerves. Both Shamblin grade and DTBOS were statistically significantly correlated with EBL of surgery and cranial nerve injuries, whereas tumor volume was statistically significantly correlated with EBL. The logistic model for predicting blood loss and cranial nerve injury with all three variables-Shamblin, DTBOS, and volume (R = 0.171, 0.221, respectively)-was superior to a model with Shamblin alone (R = 0.043, 0.091, respectively). After adjusting for Shamblin grade and volume, every 1-cm decrease in DTBOS was associated with 1.8 times increase in risk of >250 mL of blood loss (95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.55) and 1.5 times increased risk of cranial nerve injury (95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.92). CONCLUSIONS: This large study of CBTs demonstrates the value of preoperatively determining tumor dimensions and how far the tumor is located from the base of the skull. DTBOS and tumor volume, when used in combination with the Shamblin grade, better predict bleeding and cranial nerve injury risk. Furthermore, surgical resection before expansion toward the base of the skull reduces complications as every 1-cm decrease in the distance to the skull base results in 1.8 times increase in >250 mL of blood loss and 1.5 times increased risk of cranial nerve injury.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blood Loss, Surgical
Carotid Body Tumor/surgery
Cranial Nerve Injuries/etiology
Vascular Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anatomic Landmarks
Brazil
Carotid Body Tumor/complications
Carotid Body Tumor/diagnostic imaging
Carotid Body Tumor/pathology
Colombia
Computed Tomography Angiography
Cranial Nerve Injuries/diagnosis
Databases, Factual
Europe
Female
Hong Kong
Humans
Logistic Models
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Male
Mexico
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment
Risk Factors
Skull Base/diagnostic imaging
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Burden
Ultrasonography
United States
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170619
[Lr] Last revision date:170619
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170522
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28433644
[Au] Autor:Bezdudnaya T; Marchenko V; Zholudeva LV; Spruance VM; Lane MA
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, College of Medicine, Drexel University, 2900 W Queen Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19129, USA.
[Ti] Title:Supraspinal respiratory plasticity following acute cervical spinal cord injury.
[So] Source:Exp Neurol;293:181-189, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2430
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Impaired breathing is a devastating result of high cervical spinal cord injuries (SCI) due to partial or full denervation of phrenic motoneurons, which innervate the diaphragm - a primary muscle of respiration. Consequently, people with cervical level injuries often become dependent on assisted ventilation and are susceptible to secondary complications. However, there is mounting evidence for limited spontaneous recovery of respiratory function following injury, demonstrating the neuroplastic potential of respiratory networks. Although many studies have shown such plasticity at the level of the spinal cord, much less is known about the changes occurring at supraspinal levels post-SCI. The goal of this study was to determine functional reorganization of respiratory neurons in the medulla acutely (>4h) following high cervical SCI. Experiments were conducted in decerebrate, unanesthetized, vagus intact and artificially ventilated rats. In this preparation, spontaneous recovery of ipsilateral phrenic nerve activity was observed within 4 to 6h following an incomplete, C2 hemisection (C2Hx). Electrophysiological mapping of the ventrolateral medulla showed a reorganization of inspiratory and expiratory sites ipsilateral to injury. These changes included i) decreased respiratory activity within the caudal ventral respiratory group (cVRG; location of bulbospinal expiratory neurons); ii) increased proportion of expiratory phase activity within the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG; location of inspiratory bulbo-spinal neurons); iii) increased respiratory activity within ventral reticular nuclei, including lateral reticular (LRN) and paragigantocellular (LPGi) nuclei. We conclude that disruption of descending and ascending connections between the medulla and spinal cord leads to immediate functional reorganization within the supraspinal respiratory network, including neurons within the ventral respiratory column and adjacent reticular nuclei.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Mapping
Diaphragm/physiopathology
Neuronal Plasticity/physiology
Respiratory Center/physiopathology
Spinal Cord Injuries/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Action Potentials/physiology
Animals
Cervical Cord
Decerebrate State/physiopathology
Disease Models, Animal
Functional Laterality
Male
Neurons/physiology
Phrenic Nerve/injuries
Phrenic Nerve/physiopathology
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Respiratory Center/pathology
Sympathectomy, Chemical
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170817
[Lr] Last revision date:170817
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170424
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28344898
[Au] Autor:Henry BM; Sanna S; Graves MJ; Vikse J; Sanna B; Tomaszewska IM; Tubbs RS; Walocha JA; Tomaszewski KA
[Ad] Address:Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland; International Evidence-Based Anatomy Working Group, Kraków, Poland.
[Ti] Title:The Non-Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: a meta-analysis and clinical considerations.
[So] Source:PeerJ;5:e3012, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2167-8359
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The Non-Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (NRLN) is a rare embryologically-derived variant of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve (RLN). The presence of an NRLN significantly increases the risk of iatrogenic injury and operative complications. Our aim was to provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of the overall prevalence of the NRLN, its origin, and its association with an aberrant subclavian artery. METHODS: Through March 2016, a database search was performed of PubMed, CNKI, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, BIOSIS, SciELO, and Web of Science. The references in the included articles were also extensively searched. At least two reviewers judged eligibility and assessed and extracted articles. MetaXL was used for analysis, with all pooled prevalence rates calculated using a random effects model. Heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using the Chi test and the I statistic. RESULTS: Fifty-three studies (33,571 right RLNs) reported data on the prevalence of a right NRLN. The pooled prevalence estimate was 0.7% (95% CI [0.6-0.9]). The NRLN was found to originate from the vagus nerve at or above the laryngotracheal junction in 58.3% and below it in 41.7%. A right NRLN was associated with an aberrant subclavian artery in 86.7% of cases. CONCLUSION: The NRLN is a rare yet very clinically relevant structure for surgeons and is associated with increased risk of iatrogenic injury, most often leading to temporary or permanent vocal cord paralysis. A thorough understanding of the prevalence, origin, and associated pathologies is vital for preventing injuries and complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7717/peerj.3012

  10 / 652 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28288124
[Au] Autor:Abe C; Inoue T; Inglis MA; Viar KE; Huang L; Ye H; Rosin DL; Stornetta RL; Okusa MD; Guyenet PG
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.
[Ti] Title:C1 neurons mediate a stress-induced anti-inflammatory reflex in mice.
[So] Source:Nat Neurosci;20(5):700-707, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1726
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:C1 neurons, located in the medulla oblongata, mediate adaptive autonomic responses to physical stressors (for example, hypotension, hemorrhage and presence of lipopolysaccharides). We describe here a powerful anti-inflammatory effect of restraint stress, mediated by C1 neurons: protection against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Restraint stress or optogenetic C1 neuron (C1) stimulation (10 min) protected mice from ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). The protection was reproduced by injecting splenic T cells that had been preincubated with noradrenaline or splenocytes harvested from stressed mice. Stress-induced IRI protection was absent in Chrna7 knockout (a7nAChR ) mice and greatly reduced by destroying or transiently inhibiting C1. The protection conferred by C1 stimulation was eliminated by splenectomy, ganglionic-blocker administration or ß -adrenergic receptor blockade. Although C1 stimulation elevated plasma corticosterone and increased both vagal and sympathetic nerve activity, C1-mediated IRI protection persisted after subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or corticosterone receptor blockade. Overall, acute stress attenuated IRI by activating a cholinergic, predominantly sympathetic, anti-inflammatory pathway. C1s were necessary and sufficient to mediate this effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Medulla Oblongata/physiology
Neurons/physiology
Reperfusion Injury/prevention & control
Stress, Physiological/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/pharmacology
Animals
Blood Pressure/physiology
Corticosterone/blood
Heart Rate/physiology
Kidney/physiopathology
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Receptors, Steroid/antagonists & inhibitors
Reperfusion Injury/physiopathology
Restraint, Physical
Splenectomy
Sympathetic Nervous System/physiology
Vagotomy
Vagus Nerve/physiology
alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/genetics
alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adrenergic beta-Antagonists); 0 (Chrna7 protein, mouse); 0 (Receptors, Steroid); 0 (alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor); 0 (corticosterone receptor); W980KJ009P (Corticosterone)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170913
[Lr] Last revision date:170913
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170314
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/nn.4526


page 1 of 66 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information