Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 27367985
[Au] Autor:de Boysson H; Liozon E; Lambert M; Parienti JJ; Artigues N; Geffray L; Boutemy J; Ollivier Y; Maigné G; Ly K; Huglo D; Hachulla E; Hatron PY; Aouba A; Manrique A; Bienvenu B
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Internal Medicine, Caen University Hospital, Basse-Normandie University bDepartment of Internal Medicine, Limoges University Hospital cDepartment of Internal Medicine, Lille University Hospital dBiostatistics and Clinical Research Unit, Caen University Hospital eDepartment of Internal Medicine, Bayeux Hospital fDepartment of Internal Medicine, Lisieux Hospital gDepartment of Nuclear Medicine, Lille University Hospital hDepartment of Nuclear Medicine, Caen University Hospital, Normandie University France.
[Ti] Title:18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and the risk of subsequent aortic complications in giant-cell arteritis: A multicenter cohort of 130 patients.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);95(26):e3851, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previous studies reported a 2- to 17-fold higher risk of aortic complications (dilation or dissection) in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA). We aimed to determine whether or not GCA patients with large-vessel involvement demonstrated by positron emission tomography with F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) have a higher risk of aortic complications. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study between 1995 and 2014. Patients were included if they fulfilled at least 3 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with extratemporal biopsy-proven giant-cell vasculitis; they underwent at least 1 FDG-PET/CT scan at diagnosis or during follow-up; and the morphology of the aorta was assessed by medical imaging at diagnosis. Patients with an aortic complication at the time of diagnosis were excluded. Of the 130 patients included [85 women (65%), median age 70 (50-86)], GCA was biopsy proven in 77 (59%). FDG-PET/CT was performed at diagnosis in 63 (48%) patients and during the follow-up period in the 67 (52%) remaining patients. FDG-PET/CT was positive in 38/63 (60%) patients at diagnosis and in 31/67 (46%) patients when performed during follow-up (P = NS). One hundred four patients (80%) underwent at least 1 morphological assessment of the aorta during follow-up. Nine (9%) patients developed aortic complications (dilation in all and dissection in 1) at a median time of 33 (6-129) months after diagnosis. All of them displayed large-vessel inflammation on previous FDG-PET/CT. A positive FDG-PET/CT was significantly associated with a higher risk of aortic complications (P = 0.004).In our study, a positive FDG-PET/CT was associated with an increased risk of aortic complications at 5 years.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000003851

  2 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27367015
[Au] Autor:Thomas R; Puranik P; Kalal B; Britto C; Kamalesh S; Rego S; Shet A
[Ad] Address:St Johns' Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, India. rwituja.thomas@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Five-year analysis of rickettsial fevers in children in South India: Clinical manifestations and complications.
[So] Source:J Infect Dev Ctries;10(6):657-61, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1972-2680
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Rickettsial infections are re-emerging in the Indian subcontinent, especially among children. Understanding geographical and clinical epidemiology will facilitate early diagnosis and management. METHODOLOGY: Children aged <18yrs hospitalized with clinically-diagnosed rickettsial fever were reviewed retrospectively. Frequency distributions and odds ratios were calculated from tabulated data. RESULTS: Among 262 children hospitalized between January 2008-December 2012, median age was five years, and 61% were male children. Hospitalized cases increased steadily every year, with the highest burden (74%) occurring between September and January each year. Mean duration of fever was 11.5 days. Rash was present in 54.2% (142/262) of children, with 37.0% involving palms and soles. Prevalence of malnutrition was high (45% of children were underweight and 28% had stunting). Retinal vasculitis was seen in 13.7% (36/262), and the risk appeared higher in females. Severe complications were seen in 29% (purpura fulminans, 7.6%; meningitis and meningoencephalitis, 28%; septic shock, 1.9%; acute respiratory distress syndrome, 1.1%). Complications were more likely to occur in anemic children. Positive Weil-Felix test results (titers ≥1:160) were seen in 70% of cases. Elevated OX-K titers suggestive of scrub typhus were seen in 80% (147/184). Patients were treated with chloramphenicol (32%) or doxycycline (68%). Overall mortality among hospitalised children was 1.9%. CONCLUSIONS: This five-year analysis from southern India shows a high burden and increasing trend of rickettsial infections among children. The occurrence of retinal vasculitis and a high rate of severe complications draw attention to the need for early diagnosis and management of these infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3855/jidc.6822

  3 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27174355
[Au] Autor:Abissegue Y; Lyazidi Y; Arache W; Ouldsalek E; Chtata HT; Taberkant M
[Ad] Address:Service de Chirurgie Vasculaire, Hôpital Militaire d'Instruction Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco. Electronic address: drabissyves@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Multiple Visceral Artery Aneurysms: An Uncommon Manifestation of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody Vasculitis.
[So] Source:Ann Vasc Surg;34:271.e9-271.e13, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1615-5947
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis mainly affect small vessels. They are an exceptional etiology of visceral artery aneurysms, which are themselves unusual and potentially serious vascular disease. We report the case of a patient followed for vasculitis associated with ANCA with kidney disease who presented with symptomatic aneurysm of the inferior mesenteric artery and aneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27354982
[Au] Autor:Mudhar HS; Currie ZI; Salvi SM
[Ad] Address:National Specialist Ophthalmic Pathology Service (NSOPS), Department of Histopathology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.
[Ti] Title:Lacrimal Gland Intra-Lobular Duct Cysts Associated with Focal Vasculitis.
[So] Source:Ocul Oncol Pathol;1(4):225-30, 2015 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:2296-4681
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Description of the clinical and histopathological features of unusual lacrimal gland intra-glandular duct cysts. PROCEDURES: A 38-year-old male presented with bilateral upper lid lumpiness, which was worse on the left. Computed tomography scan showed bilateral multiple lacrimal gland cysts, which were larger on the left compared to the right. After two unsuccessful attempts to excise the largest cyst on the left side, it was removed at the third attempt using a novel technique that incorporated the use of fibrin glue to fill the remaining cavity. RESULTS: The microscopy of the left-sided cyst comprised a cavity containing fibrin glue, lined by intra-lobular lacrimal gland duct epithelium. The cyst wall contained reactive lymphoid aggregates, plasma cells and eosinophils associated with fibrosis. Focally, there were small vessels affected by an acute vasculitis associated with eosinophils and a granulomatous component. CONCLUSIONS: We ascribe the cyst formation to the effects of tractional fibrosis secondary to focal vasculitis and to obstructive fibrosis of the lacrimal ductules. This case also described a novel use of Tisseel fibrin glue to assist intact removal of a lacrimal gland cyst.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160629
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000375255

  5 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27072640
[Au] Autor:Mehta RI; Mehta RI
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210. Electronic address: mehtar@upstate.edu.
[Ti] Title:Polymer-induced central nervous system complications following vascular procedures: spectrum of iatrogenic injuries and review of outcomes.
[So] Source:Hum Pathol;53:178-90, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8392
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Polymer substances are commonly applied as surface coatings on endovascular catheters and vascular devices. Adverse effects related to their use have been reported, although the overall clinical significance and appropriate methods of detection of these complications have been unclear. In this analysis, we systematically reviewed clinical and diagnostic features in 32 patients (age, 36-87years; mean, 59years) in whom intracranial polymer reactions were documented following vascular interventions. Associated neuroradiologic and neuropathologic findings were variable and included cerebral vasculitis or vasculopathy (63%), abscess or granuloma formation (38%), ischemic infarcts (28%), parenchymal hematomas (28%), white matter change (25%), and/or chemical meningitis (22%). Location(s) of polymer reactions varied and included sites adjacent to and/or downstream from instrument insertion or implantation. Presenting clinical signs included focal neurologic deficits (41%), headache (22%), constitutional symptoms (19%), meningitis (16%), seizure and/or involuntary movements (9%), coma (6%), and syncope (3%). Adverse outcomes included stroke (31%), death (28%), delayed communicating hydrocephalus (9%), steroid dependency (9%), steroid complications (6%), and cerebral volume loss (3%). In some cases, these complications necessitated increased cost and length of medical care. In this review, we highlight the diverse features of polymer-induced reactions involving the central nervous system and summarize distinct diagnostic patterns that may enable earlier premortem detection of these lesions in the postprocedural clinical setting. Further work in this area is necessary to identify additional etiologic, preventative and therapeutic strategies. These data have potentially broad implications pertaining to the safety, efficacy, standards of use, storage, manufacturing, and regulation of new and emerging vascular devices and polymer nanotechnologies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26945335
[Au] Autor:Rosenbaum JT; Sibley CH; Lin P
[Ad] Address:aDepartment of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University bDepartment of Medicine, Oregon Health & Sciences University cDepartment of Cell Biology, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon, USA dLegacy Devers Eye Institute, Legacy Health System, Portland, Oregon, USA.
[Ti] Title:Retinal vasculitis.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Rheumatol;28(3):228-35, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1531-6963
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Ophthalmologists and rheumatologists frequently have a miscommunication among themselves, and as a result differ in their opinion for patients consulting them with retinal vasculitis. This report seeks to establish a common understanding of the term, retinal vasculitis, and to review recent studies on this diagnosis. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic basis of some rare forms of retinal vascular disease has recently been described. Identified genes include CAPN5, TREX1, and TNFAIP3; Behçet's disease is a systemic illness that is very commonly associated with occlusive retinal vasculitis; retinal imaging, including fluorescein angiography and other newer imaging modalities, has proven crucial to the identification and characterization of retinal vasculitis and its complications; although monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-17A or interleukin-1 beta failed in trials for Behçet's disease, antibodies to TNF-alpha, either infliximab or adalimumab, have demonstrated consistent benefit in managing this disease. Interferon treatment and B-cell depletion therapy via rituximab may be beneficial in certain types of retinal vasculitis. SUMMARY: Retinal vasculitis is an important entity for rheumatologists to understand. Retinal vasculitis associated with Behçet's disease responds to monoclonal antibodies that neutralize TNF, but the many other forms of noninfectious retinal vasculitis may require alternate therapeutic management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/BOR.0000000000000271

  7 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26595812
[Au] Autor:Wu J; Saleh MA; Kirabo A; Itani HA; Montaniel KR; Xiao L; Chen W; Mernaugh RL; Cai H; Bernstein KE; Goronzy JJ; Weyand CM; Curci JA; Barbaro NR; Moreno H; Davies SS; Roberts LJ; Madhur MS; Harrison DG
[Ti] Title:Immune activation caused by vascular oxidation promotes fibrosis and hypertension.
[So] Source:J Clin Invest;126(1):50-67, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1558-8238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vascular oxidative injury accompanies many common conditions associated with hypertension. In the present study, we employed mouse models with excessive vascular production of ROS (tg(sm/p22phox) mice, which overexpress the NADPH oxidase subunit p22(phox) in smooth muscle, and mice with vascular-specific deletion of extracellular SOD) and have shown that these animals develop vascular collagen deposition, aortic stiffening, renal dysfunction, and hypertension with age. T cells from tg(sm/p22phox) mice produced high levels of IL-17A and IFN-γ. Crossing tg(sm/p22phox) mice with lymphocyte-deficient Rag1(-/-) mice eliminated vascular inflammation, aortic stiffening, renal dysfunction, and hypertension; however, adoptive transfer of T cells restored these processes. Isoketal-protein adducts, which are immunogenic, were increased in aortas, DCs, and macrophages of tg(sm/p22phox) mice. Autologous pulsing with tg(sm/p22phox) aortic homogenates promoted DCs of tg(sm/p22phox) mice to stimulate T cell proliferation and production of IFN-γ, IL-17A, and TNF-α. Treatment with the superoxide scavenger tempol or the isoketal scavenger 2-hydroxybenzylamine (2-HOBA) normalized blood pressure; prevented vascular inflammation, aortic stiffening, and hypertension; and prevented DC and T cell activation. Moreover, in human aortas, the aortic content of isoketal adducts correlated with fibrosis and inflammation severity. Together, these results define a pathway linking vascular oxidant stress to immune activation and aortic stiffening and provide insight into the systemic inflammation encountered in common vascular diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hypertension/etiology
Inflammation/complications
Oxidative Stress
Vascular Stiffness
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Age Factors
Animals
Collagen/metabolism
Cytokines/biosynthesis
Fibrosis
Humans
Male
Mice
T-Lymphocytes/physiology
Vasculitis/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cytokines); 9007-34-5 (Collagen)
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160105
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26373563
[Au] Autor:Hatemi G; Ozguler Y; Direskeneli H; Mahr A; Gul A; Levi V; Aydin SZ; Mumcu G; Sertel-Berk O; Stevens RM; Yazici H; Merkel PA
[Ad] Address:From the Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul; Division of Rheumatology, Marmara University Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey; Department of Internal Medicine, University Paris Diderot, Paris, France; Division of ...
[Ti] Title:Current Status, Goals, and Research Agenda for Outcome Measures Development in Behçet Syndrome: Report from OMERACT 2014.
[So] Source:J Rheumatol;42(12):2436-41, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0315-162X
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: There is an unmet need for reliable, validated, and widely accepted outcomes and outcome measures for use in clinical trials in Behçet syndrome (BS). Our report summarizes initial steps taken by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) vasculitis working group toward developing a core set of outcome measures for BS according to the OMERACT methodology, including the OMERACT Filter 2.0, and discussions during the first meeting of the BS working group held during OMERACT 12 (2014). METHODS: During OMERACT 12, some of the important challenges in developing outcomes for BS were outlined and discussed, and a research agenda was drafted. RESULTS: Among topics discussed were the advantages and disadvantages of a composite measure for BS that evaluates several organs/organ systems; bringing patients and physicians together for discussions about how to assess disease activity; use of organ-specific measures developed for other diseases; and the inclusion of generic, disease-specific, or organ-specific measures. The importance of incorporating patients' perspectives, concerns, and ideas into outcome measure development was emphasized. CONCLUSION: The planned research agenda includes conducting a Delphi exercise among physicians from different specialties that are involved in the care of patients with BS and among patients with BS, with the aim of identifying candidate domains and subdomains to be assessed in randomized clinical trials of BS, and candidate items for a composite measure. The ultimate goal of the group is to develop a validated and widely accepted core set of outcomes and outcome measures for use in clinical trials in BS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3899/jrheum.141147

  9 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26304576
[Au] Autor:Bhagwat A; Mukhedkar S; Ekbote S; Gordon JB
[Ad] Address:Kamalnayan Bajaj Hospital, Aurangabad, India. Electronic address: drajitbhagwat@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Missed Kawasaki disease in childhood presenting as myocardial infarction in adults.
[So] Source:Indian Heart J;67(4):385-8, 2015 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0019-4832
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis that occurs in young children and was first described by Japanese pediatrician Tomisaku Kawasaki in 1967. Although originally thought to be a rare condition, KD has become the most common cause of acquired heart disease in the pediatric population in developed countries. The majority of patients with KD appear to have a benign prognosis, but a subset of patients with coronary artery aneurysms are at risk for ischemic events and require lifelong treatment. In the 4 decades since the initial recognition of KD, the number of patients reaching adulthood has continued to grow. Adult cardiologists will be increasingly involved in the management of these patients. Currently, there are no established guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of adult patients who have had KD. We report 4 most probable cases of KD missed in childhood and presented as acute coronary syndrome in adulthood.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 35776 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26268607
[Au] Autor:Galvani S; Sanson M; Blaho VA; Swendeman SL; Obinata H; Conger H; Dahlbäck B; Kono M; Proia RL; Smith JD; Hla T
[Ad] Address:Center for Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065, USA....
[Ti] Title:HDL-bound sphingosine 1-phosphate acts as a biased agonist for the endothelial cell receptor S1P1 to limit vascular inflammation.
[So] Source:Sci Signal;8(389):ra79, 2015 Aug 11.
[Is] ISSN:1937-9145
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is abundant in endothelial cells, where it regulates vascular development and microvascular barrier function. In investigating the role of endothelial cell S1P1 in adult mice, we found that the endothelial S1P1 signal was enhanced in regions of the arterial vasculature experiencing inflammation. The abundance of proinflammatory adhesion proteins, such as ICAM-1, was enhanced in mice with endothelial cell-specific deletion of S1pr1 and suppressed in mice with endothelial cell-specific overexpression of S1pr1, suggesting a protective function of S1P1 in vascular disease. The chaperones ApoM(+)HDL (HDL) or albumin bind to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in the circulation; therefore, we tested the effects of S1P bound to each chaperone on S1P1 signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to ApoM(+)HDL-S1P, but not to albumin-S1P, promoted the formation of a cell surface S1P1-ß-arrestin 2 complex and attenuated the ability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα to activate NF-κB and increase ICAM-1 abundance. Although S1P bound to either chaperone induced MAPK activation, albumin-S1P triggered greater Gi activation and receptor endocytosis. Endothelial cell-specific deletion of S1pr1 in the hypercholesterolemic Apoe(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in the descending aorta. We propose that the ability of ApoM(+)HDL to act as a biased agonist on S1P1 inhibits vascular inflammation, which may partially explain the cardiovascular protective functions of HDL.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Atherosclerosis/metabolism
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/metabolism
Lipoproteins, HDL/metabolism
Lysophospholipids/metabolism
Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/metabolism
Signal Transduction
Sphingosine/analogs & derivatives
Vasculitis/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apolipoproteins/genetics
Apolipoproteins/metabolism
Atherosclerosis/genetics
Atherosclerosis/pathology
Disease Models, Animal
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/pathology
Humans
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/genetics
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1/metabolism
Lipocalins/genetics
Lipocalins/metabolism
Lipoproteins, HDL/genetics
Lysophospholipids/genetics
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/agonists
Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics
Sphingosine/genetics
Sphingosine/metabolism
Vasculitis/genetics
Vasculitis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (APOM protein, human); 0 (Apolipoproteins); 0 (ICAM1 protein, human); 0 (Icam1 protein, mouse); 0 (Lipocalins); 0 (Lipoproteins, HDL); 0 (Lysophospholipids); 0 (Receptors, Lysosphingolipid); 0 (S1PR1 protein, human); 0 (S1pr1 protein, mouse); 0 (apolipoprotein M, mouse); 126547-89-5 (Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1); 26993-30-6 (sphingosine 1-phosphate); NGZ37HRE42 (Sphingosine)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160701
[Lr] Last revision date:160701
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150813
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1126/scisignal.aaa2581


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