Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Vasculitis [Words]
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  1 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23886885
[Au] Autor:Ene N; Bélénotti P; Benyamine A; Sovaila S; Ben Sahla Talet MH; Kaminsky P; Serratrice J; Weiller PJ
[Ad] Address:Service de médecine interne, CHU Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex, France....
[Ti] Title:Forme pseudo-pathomimique de granulomatose avec polyangéite (anciennement maladie de Wegener). [Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (previously Wegener's granulomatosis) mimicking malingering].
[So] Source:Rev Med Interne;35(8):540-2, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1768-3122
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: ANCA vasculitis may involve the skin and develop slowly without specific histology, and without autoantibodies. CASE REPORT: We report a 50-year-old woman who experienced bilateral mastectomy because of ulcero-necrotic, non-specific inflammatory cutaneous lesions of the breasts. First considered by others as a malinger patient, she developed oto-neurological lesions leading to the diagnosis of Wegener's granulomatosis. Five years later, specific antibodies of the disease were present. CONCLUSION: Cutaneous involvement by ANCA vasculitis can be isolated for a long time. Physicians must have a high degree of suspicion to avoid diagnostic delay of ANCA vasculitis.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25019429
[Au] Autor:Abdel Razek AA; Alvarez H; Bagg S; Refaat S; Castillo M
[Ad] Address:From the Departments of Diagnostic Radiology (A.A.K.A.R.) and Rheumatology (S.R.), Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Elgomheryia Street, Mansoura, Egypt 35512; and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (H.A., S.B., M.C.).
[Ti] Title:Imaging spectrum of CNS vasculitis.
[So] Source:Radiographics;34(4):873-94, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1527-1323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cerebral vasculitis is characterized by inflammation of the walls of blood vessels and may affect vessels of any size. The pathogenesis of vasculitis remains poorly understood. Vasculitis may affect large vessels (Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis), medium-sized vessels (Kawasaki disease, polyarteritis nodosa), small vessels (immunoglobulin A vasculitis, microscopic polyangiitis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis), or variable-sized vessels (Behçet disease, Cogan syndrome). Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (CNS) is an idiopathic disorder with no evidence of generalized inflammation that may simulate reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. Vasculitis may be secondary to systemic disease, infection, malignancy, drug use, or radiation therapy. Imaging findings vary from small ischemic changes to frank infarction, hemorrhage, and white matter edema and may show contrast material enhancement. The cerebral arteries may demonstrate a beaded appearance with variable degrees of stenosis, occlusion, and contrast enhancement of the vessel wall. Correlation of imaging findings with clinical presentation and laboratory test results helps establish the diagnosis of CNS vasculitis. ©RSNA, 2014.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1148/rg.344135028

  3 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24387970
[Au] Autor:Hazlewood GS; Metzler C; Tomlinson GA; Gross WL; Feldman BM; Guillevin L; Pagnoux C
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N1N1 Canada. Electronic address: glenhazlewood@gmail.com....
[Ti] Title:Non-biologic remission maintenance therapy in adult patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Joint Bone Spine;81(4):337-41, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1778-7254
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the comparative efficacy of non-biologic treatments for remission maintenance in ANCA-associated vasculitis. METHODS: We identified all randomized trials comparing leflunomide, azathioprine, methotrexate or mycophenolate mofetil in adult patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis or microscopic polyangiitis. Relapse-free survival was compared through hazard ratios (HR) using a Bayesian fixed-effects network meta-analysis. Multiple sensitivity analyses were performed to explore biases identified in one trial using original trial data. RESULTS: Three trials were available (leflunomide-methotrexate, methotrexate- azathioprine, azathioprine-mycophenolate). Mycophenolate was inferior to all treatments, although the 95% credible interval (CrI) of the HR relative to methotrexate crossed 1. Leflunomide was superior to azathioprine (HR 0.43 [95% CrI: 0.14-1.3]) and methotrexate (HR 0.47 [95% CrI: 0.18-1.2]), although the 95% CrI also crossed 1. There was a 90% probability that leflunomide was the best treatment. After down weighting the effect of leflunomide vs. methotrexate for early trial termination and slow MTX dose escalation, there remained a 55% probability leflunomide was best. CONCLUSION: Based on indirect evidence, leflunomide is effective in maintaining remission in granulomatosis with polyangiitis or microscopic polyangiitis relative to other non-biologic treatments. Further randomized trials of leflunomide are needed for confirmation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25021589
[Au] Autor:Zafar S; Trevatt A; Joshi A; Besherdas K
[Ad] Address:Gastroenterology, Chase Farm Hospital, Enfield, Middlesex, London, UK....
[Ti] Title:PWE-103 Terminal Ileitis At Endoscopy In Clinical Practice: Is It Always Due To Crohn's Disease?
[So] Source:Gut;63 Suppl 1:A169-70, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1468-3288
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Terminal ileitis (TI) when identified at endoscopy is generally assumed to be secondary to Crohn's disease (CD). However, TI may be due to other causes including infection, malignancy, radiation, vasculitis and autoimmune disease. In the presence of histological findings such as granulomas, cryptitis, crypt abscesses, fissuring and ulceration, a diagnosis of CD can be inferred. In the absence of such histological correlation, a diagnosis of CD may be reinforced by finding inflammation on colonoscopy or small bowel studies in other parts of the gut, suggestive of skip lesions. We hypothesise that patients diagnosed with TI on endoscopy do not all have CD, but may be inaccurately labelled as such. METHODS: Single-centre retrospective analysis of 56 patients diagnosed with TI on endoscopy at a district general hospital in London between 2007-2013. Data obtained from endoscopic reporting tool and patient records were correlated with histology and imaging. The number of patients with the finding of ileitis on endoscopy subsequently diagnosed with CD was studied and the basis of this diagnosis was evaluated. RESULTS: 68% of patients (38/56) with TI on endoscopy had histological confirmation of ileitis: 11 of whom had characteristic features of Crohn's on histology, whilst the remaining 27 had mildly active ileitis on histology. 22 of these 27 patients underwent additional investigations to confirm (19/22) or exclude IBD (3/22). 5 of the 27 patients with histological ileitis that was not typical of CD were diagnosed with IBD, without further evidence to demonstrate this. In total 35/38 (92.1%) patients with histological and endoscopic evidence of inflammation were diagnosed with CD. Of the 18/56 patients (32%) with TI on endoscopy but normal histology, 9 had further investigations including MRI, barium studies and US abdomen to exclude CD. 4 patients were diagnosed with CD despite normal histology. 6/18 patients with normal histology were lost to follow up, although all patients diagnosed with IBD were followed up in GI clinic. CONCLUSION: We conclude that although the majority of patients with TI on endoscopy have CD, 1/3 of our patients had no histological correlation of inflammation. 16% of patients with endoscopic TI with mildly active ilieits on histology had no further imaging to authenticate a diagnosis of CD and 8% of patients with normal histology with no further investigations were labelled as CD. The latter group of patients may be inaccurately labelled with a diagnosis of CD and along with this the potential stigma associated with a chronic ailment, risk of escalation therapy with immununosuppressives/biologics and occasionally unnecessary surgery. DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST: None Declared.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2014-307263.363

  5 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25023725
[Au] Autor:Barile-Fabris L; Hernández-Cabrera MF; Barragan-Garfias JA
[Ad] Address:Rheumatology Department, Hospital de Especialidades. Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI "Bernardo Sepúlveda", Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Avda. San Bernabé, 712 Bis, casa 3. San Jerónimo Lídice. C.P. 10,200, Mexico, Mexico, barilita@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.
[So] Source:Curr Rheumatol Rep;16(9):440, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1534-6307
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex heterogeneous autoimmune disease with a wide variety of clinical and serological manifestations that may affect any organ. Vasculitis prevalence in SLE is reported to be between 11 % and 36 %. A diverse clinical spectrum, due to inflammatory involvement of vessels of all sizes, is present. Even though cutaneous lesions, representing small vessel involvement, are the most frequent, medium and large vessel vasculitis may present with visceral affection, with life-threatening manifestations such as mesenteric vasculitis, pulmonary hemorrhage, or mononeuritis multiplex, with detrimental consequences. Early recognition and an appropriate treatment are crucial. Recent studies have shown that vasculitis in patients with SLE may present different clinical forms based on the organ involved and the size of the affected vessel. It is noteworthy that the episodes of vasculitis are not always accompanied by high disease activity. Recent articles on this topic have focused on new treatments for the control of vascular disease, such as biological therapies such as Rituximab and Belimumab, among others.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11926-014-0440-9

  6 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024709
[Au] Autor:To U; Kim J; Chia D
[Ad] Address:Yale School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
[Ti] Title:Lupus flare: an uncommon presentation of disseminated gonorrhea.
[So] Source:Case Rep Med;2014:626095, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1687-9627
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the US with 700,000 annual cases. Although most cases of gonorrhea are localized, approximately 0.5-3% become disseminated. Here we discuss a rare case of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed septic shock from disseminated gonorrhea infection (DGI). Our patient is a 24-year-old woman with SLE, mixed connective tissue disease with cutaneous vasculitis, and lupus nephritis who presented with several weeks of malaise and generalized body aches associated with a diffuse rash along her fingers, palms, and trunk. Infectious workup was unrevealing with the exception of a positive gonorrhea test obtained from a cervical swab. Given her symptoms of tenosynovitis, the appearance of her skin lesions, and her positive gonorrhea test, she was diagnosed with septic shock secondary to DGI. With antibiotic treatment, the patient reported a dramatic improvement of the pain in her swollen joints and her rash receded. Patients diagnosed with SLE carry an increased risk of gonorrhea regardless of whether or not they are being treated for their SLE. Although it is well-documented that SLE is associated with severe DGI, few describe it resulting in overt septic shock.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/626095

  7 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25020845
[Au] Autor:Bublikov D; Andrienko A
[Ad] Address:Altay State Medical University, Barnaul, Russian Federation.
[Ti] Title:P461New targets of therapy at rheumatoid vasculitis: focus on microcirculation.
[So] Source:Cardiovasc Res;103 Suppl 1:S84, 2014 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1755-3245
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: The rheumatoid vaskulitis (RV) strikes about a quarter of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, causing defeat of visceral bodies and systems, a cachexy and progressing of articulate destruction. Therefore RV treatment - an actual problem of modern rheumatology. AIM: To study microcirculation at sick RV and possibility of its improvement the pentoxifyllini. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Research included women, patients rheumatoid artritis (n=69). Middle age - 55,54±3,22 years. Having positive antibodies to cyclic citrullined peptide (ACCP) and a positive rheumatoid factor in blood. All patients received DMARD-therapy. Microcirculation was investigated by a method of a laser Doppler flowmetri on forearm skin. Two groups of patients - intact (n=39), not receiving a preparation and research (n=30), receiving a preparation are allocated. Pentoxifyllin was entered in an average dose of 800 milligrams per day.Research was conducted within two weeks. Statistical processing carried out by means of Mann-Whitney methods. RESULTS: Microcirculation in the first group made 14,28±5,21 perfusion units. In the second group - 19,24±2,65 perfusion units that made statistically significant difference (p=0,00032). Clinically patients of intact group had no dynamics. The patients receiving in addition to DMARD therapy pentoxifyllin (the second group) had positive clinical dynamics of articulate and visceral syndromes. Moreover, statistically significantly lower CRP levels (p=0,0043). CONCLUSION: Pentoxifyllin inclusion in a dose of 800 mg per day leads to positive clinical and laboratory dynamics at patients rheumatoid vaskulitis and can be a new target for therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/cvr/cvu091.139

  8 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024566
[Au] Autor:Chandra SR; Seshadri R; Chikabasaviah Y; Issac TG
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India....
[Ti] Title:Progressive limbic encephalopathy: Problems and prospects.
[So] Source:Ann Indian Acad Neurol;17(2):166-70, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0972-2327
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: It was observed that a good number of patients presenting with psychiatric manifestations when investigated later because of unresponsiveness to treatment or late development of organic features turned out to be treatable limbic syndromes. INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study is to assess the patients presenting with new onset neuropsychiatric symptoms satisfying the criteria for probable limbic encephalitis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients referred to neurology department following a period of treatment for neuropsychiatric symptoms, which did not respond to conventional treatment were analyzed using Electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid, screening for malignancy Vasculitic work-up, histopathology and autoantibody done when feasible. RESULTS: There were 22 patients satisfying criteria for probable limbic encephalitis. Their mean age was 34.5 years. Symptoms varied from unexplained anxiety, panic and depression, lack of inhibition, wandering, incontinence, myoclonus, seizures and stroke like episodes. Three had systemic malignancy, 10 had chronic infection, one each with vasculitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Hashimoto encephalitis and two each with non-convulsive status, cryptogenic and Idiopathic inflammation. CONCLUSION: All patients who present with new onset neuropsychiatric symptoms need to be evaluated for sub-acute infections, inflammation, autoimmune limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic syndrome. A repeated 20 minute EEG is a very effective screening tool to detect organicity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0972-2327.132616

  9 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25022060
[Au] Autor:Watanabe N; Nagatomo R; Okubo S; Yokota H; Ikeda H; Yatomi Y
[Ti] Title:[Performance and clinical evaluation of antinuclear antibody test based on fluorescence enzyme immunoassay].
[So] Source:Rinsho Byori;62(4):315-23, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0047-1860
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The measurement of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is used for screening of connective tissue diseases (CTD) in the laboratory. ANA detection is performed by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) assay on HEp-2 cells from human larynx carcinoma. However, it lacks specificity for the identification of specific diseases and antigen reactivity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the EliA CTD Screen (EliA), a new enzyme fluoroimmunoassay (Phadia AB, Uppsala, Sweden) for detection of ANA in human serum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study involved a total of 732 serum samples, 200 from healthy donors, 297 from patients with CTD and 235 from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis syndrome and relative disease of CTD. For all sera, ANA was measured by IF, commercial assay (MESACUP) and EliA. RESULT: The sensitivity and specificity of EliA were 73.7% and 78.7%, respectively, whereas those of MESACUP were 80.8% and 64.7%, respectively. Area under the receiver operating curves for EliA, MESACUP and IF were 0.821, 0.786 and 0.730, respectively. The concordance rate between EliA and MESACUP was 84.2%. These discrepancies between those 2 assays were found in 84 sera. Further investigation were done by each ANA antigen tests for the discrepant results of EliA in 83 sera. The discrepancies might be occurred by antigen difference or non-specific response. CONCLUSION: AUC results showed that the diagnostic performance of EliA was superior to MESACUP and IF. EliA had a good performance as method for screening of CTD.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 31970 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25009743
[Au] Autor:Kolar P
[Ad] Address:University Eye Clinic, Masaryk University Brno and University Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic.
[Ti] Title:Risk factors for central and branch retinal vein occlusion: a meta-analysis of published clinical data.
[So] Source:J Ophthalmol;2014:724780, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2090-004X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a major cause of vision loss. Of the two main types of RVO, branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) is 4 to 6 times more prevalent than central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). A basic risk factor for RVO is advancing age. Further risk factors include systemic conditions like hypertension, arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, vascular cerebral stroke, blood hyperviscosity, and thrombophilia. A strong risk factor for RVO is the metabolic syndrome (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia). Individuals with end-organ damage caused by diabetes mellitus and hypertension have greatly increased risk for RVO. Socioeconomic status seems to be a risk factor too. American blacks are more often diagnosed with RVO than non-Hispanic whites. Females are, according to some studies, at lower risk than men. The role of thrombophilic risk factors in RVO is still controversial. Congenital thrombophilic diseases like factor V Leiden mutation, hyperhomocysteinemia and anticardiolipin antibodies increase the risk of RVO. Cigarette smoking also increases the risk of RVO as do systemic inflammatory conditions like vasculitis and Behcet disease. Ophthalmic risk factors for RVO are ocular hypertension and glaucoma, higher ocular perfusion pressure, and changes in the retinal arteries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Cu] Class update date: 140714
[Lr] Last revision date:140714
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140710
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/724780


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