Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Vasculitis [Words]
References found : 31995 [refine]
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  1 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25041773
[Au] Autor:Haddad R; O'Brien B; Evans J; Orr C
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Novel finding of carbamazepine induced gall bladder granulomatous vasculitis.
[So] Source:Intern Med J;44(7):700-3, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1445-5994
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a 63-year-old male patient who presented with eosinophilic granulomatous vasculitis of the gall bladder secondary to carbamazepine drug therapy. Following commencement of carbamazepine for treatment of partial seizures, the patient developed an allergic cutaneous drug rash. He continued to take carbamazepine postdischarge despite cessation by the treating team. He represented 7 weeks later with acute pancreatitis and cholecystis. Gall bladder histopathology showed a granulomatous vasculitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/imj.12466

  2 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24237487
[Au] Autor:Sharma A; Gopalakrishan D; Nada R; Kumar S; Dogra S; Aggarwal MM; Gupta R; Minz RW; Kakkar N; Vashishtha RK; Singh S
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Uncommon presentations of primary systemic necrotizing vasculitides: the Great Masquerades.
[So] Source:Int J Rheum Dis;17(5):562-72, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1756-185X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Systemic vasculitides are great masqueraders and at times their presenting manifestations can be very different from the usual recognized patterns. Such uncommon presentations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis), classical polyarteritis nodosa and unclassifiable vasculitides are described here with the relevant review of literature. METHODS: All patients diagnosed as having systemic vasculitides and classified as having granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis), classic polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis and unclassifiable vasculitis according to EMEA consensus methodology and followed up prospectively from June 2007 to December, 2011 were included. Details of uncommon presentations of these disorders were identified. RESULTS: Seventy-nine patients with systemic vasculitides were seen under our rheumatology services during this period. These included 45 patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis), 18 with classic polyarteritis nodosa, five with microscopic polyangiitis, four with Churg-Strauss syndrome and seven with unclassifiable vasculitis. The uncommon presentations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis were a tumefactive subcutaneous mass in the thigh; prostatomegaly with obstructive uropathy and advanced renal failure; and predominant gastrointestinal (GI) vasculitis with thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy at presentation. The uncommon manifestations of classic polyarteritis nodosa were secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. One patient with massive lower GI bleeding required surgical resection of the large bowel which showed isolated necrotizing granulomatous GI vasculitis. Single organ vasculitis of the GI tract was diagnosed. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic necrotizing vasculitides may present with uncommon manifestations and a high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prompt treatment to prevent adverse outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/1756-185X.12223

  3 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24188493
[Au] Autor:Burmeister A; Assi LK; Ferro CJ; Hughes RG; Barnett AH; Bellary S; Cockwell P; Pratt G; Hutchison CA
[Ad] Address:Renal Institute of Birmingham, University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; The Binding Site Group Ltd, Birmingham, UK.
[Ti] Title:The relationship between high-sensitivity CRP and polyclonal Free Light Chains as markers of inflammation in chronic disease.
[So] Source:Int J Lab Hematol;36(4):415-24, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1751-553X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Serum concentrations of polyclonal free light chains (FLC) represent the activity of the adaptive immune system. This study assessed the relationship between polyclonal FLC and the established marker of innate immunity, C-reactive protein (CRP), in chronic and acute disease. METHODS: We utilized four cross-sectional chronic disease patient cohorts: chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes, vasculitis and kidney transplantation; and a longitudinal intensive care case series to assess the kinetics of production in acute disease. RESULTS: There was a weak association between polyclonal FLC and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) in the study cohorts. A longitudinal assessment in acute disease showed a gradual increase in FLC concentrations over time, often when CRP levels were falling, demonstrating clear differences in the response kinetics of CRP and FLC in this setting. CONCLUSION: Polyclonal FLC and hs-CRP provide independent information as to inflammatory status. Prospective studies are now required to assess the utility of hs-CRP and polyclonal FLC in combination for risk stratification in disease populations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/ijlh.12159

  4 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24393805
[Au] Autor:Chu YC; Hsu BB; Tseng KC
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chia-Yi, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Lupus Mesenteric Vasculitis With GI and Genitourinary Tract Involvement.
[So] Source:Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol;12(8):e69-70, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1542-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24882804
[Au] Autor:Son MH; Jung MY; Choi S; Cho D; Kim TS
[Ad] Address:Department of Life Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea....
[Ti] Title:IL-32γ induces chemotaxis of activated T cells via dendritic cell-derived CCL5.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;450(1):30-5, 2014 Jul 18.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Interleukin (IL)-32 has been associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis and Crohn's disease. We have previously reported that IL-32γ, the IL-32 isoform with the highest biological activity, could act as an immune modulator through regulation of dendritic cell (DC) functions in immune responses. Cell locomotion is crucial for induction of an effective immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanisms of IL-32γ on recruitment of T cells. IL-32γ upregulated the expression of several chemokines including CCL2, CCL4, and CCL5 in the DCs. In particular, IL-32γ significantly increased CCL5 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with JNK and NF-κB inhibitors suppressed IL-32γ-induced CCL5 expression in DCs, indicating that IL-32γ induced CCL5 production through the JNK and NF-κB pathways. Furthermore, supernatants from IL-32γ-treated DCs showed chemotactic activities controlling migration of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and these activities were suppressed by addition of neutralizing anti-CCL5 antibody. These results show that IL-32γ effectively promotes migration of activated T cells via CCL5 production in DCs. The chemotactic potential of IL-32γ may explain the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-32 and the pathologic role of IL-32 in immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24998326
[Au] Autor:Chabrier S; Darteyre S; Mazzola L; Stphan JL
[Ad] Address:Ple Couple-Mre-Enfant, hpital Bellevue, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055 Saint-Etienne cedex 2, France. Electronic address: stephane.chabrier@chu-st-etienne.fr....
[Ti] Title:Vascularites du systme nerveux central. [Childhood cerebral vasculitis].
[So] Source:Arch Pediatr;21(8):884-93, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1769-664X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Central nervous system vasculitides are defined as the invasion of the vascular wall by blood-borne inflammatory cells. In childhood, they may be classified according to their trigger event (infectious vs. non-infectious), their temporal course (time-limited vs. chronic), and the size of the affected vessel. Diseases apparently confined to the central nervous system are also distinguished from secondary forms, associated with infection or rheumatic or systemic inflammatory disorders. Large-vessel vasculitis, the most frequent form, causes stroke and presents with acute focal deficits. MR, or more seldom contrast angiography is required for the positive diagnosis, while the child's medical history conveys the etiological diagnosis. The clinical manifestations of small-vessel vasculitis include headaches, seizures, focal deficits, cognitive decline, and behavior changes that can occur insidiously over a few weeks or a few months. The diagnosis is based on the associated clinical and biological symptoms in secondary forms and on cerebromeningeal biopsy in primary forms. Secondary forms of vasculitides are treated according to the etiology. The injury of large basal arteries is often observed after infection, especially varicella, and is also called transient focal cerebral arteriopathy (TCA) or post-varicella arteriopathy (PVA). This focal, monophasic, and time-limited entity is highly specific of childhood. There are no arguments in the current literature supporting the hypothesis that an aggressive immunomodulatory treatment would be more effective, in terms of recurrence rate or functional outcome, than aspirin alone. In contrast, the diffuse, prolonged, and aggressive course of the rare primary vasculitis of the central nervous system requires a prolonged immunosuppressive treatment. The management of associated symptoms, treatment-related adverse effects, and sequelae is based on a multidisciplinary approach.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24479692
[Au] Autor:Mao Y; Peng XY; You QS; Wang H; Zhao M; Jonas JB
[Ad] Address:Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Ophthalmology and Visual Science Key Lab, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Tuberculous uveitis in China.
[So] Source:Acta Ophthalmol;92(5):e393-7, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1755-3768
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To assess tuberculous uveitis in Chinese patients. METHODS: The hospital-based observational case series study included patients who attended a third-referral hospital and presented with chronic and recurrent uveitis without primarily detected aetiology. The patients underwent the tuberculin skin test (TST) and/or interferon gamma release test (IGRA). Patients with positive test results received standard antituberculous therapy. Patients who responded to the therapy and did not show recurrence of uveitis in the follow-up period were diagnosed as tuberculous uveitis and formed the study group. The remaining patients were diagnosed as non-tuberculous uveitis and formed the control group. The clinical characteristics were compared between both groups. RESULTS: The study group with tuberculous uveitis included 46 patients and the non-tuberculous group 38 patients. Multifocal choroiditis [n=9 (20%) versus n=1(3%); p=0.04] and retinal vasculitis [n=25(54%) versus 8=(21.1%); p=0.002] were significantly more common in the study group. Of 25 patients with retinal vasculitis in the study group, 11 patients (44%) additionally showed choroiditis lesions, compared with only one (13%) of eight patients in the control group (p=0.01). In multivariate regression analysis, multifocal choroiditis [odds ratio (OR): 32.1], choroidal granuloma (OR: 21.4) and retinal vasculitis (OR: 11.2) were independent predictors of tubercular uveitis. CONCLUSIONS: About 50% of a group of 84 patients with primarily unexplained chronic posterior uveitis had tuberculosis and showed multifocal choroiditis, choroidal granuloma and retinal vasculitis. These features had a high predictive value for the diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis. Tuberculosis is an important part in the differential diagnosis of unexplained uveitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/aos.12351

  8 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24570072
[Au] Autor:Chen Y; Bao H; Liu Z; Zhang H; Zeng C; Liu Z; Hu W
[Ad] Address:National Clinical Research Center of Kidney Diseases, Jinling Hospital, University School of Medicine, Nanjing, 210002, Jiangsu, China.
[Ti] Title:Clinico-pathological features and outcomes of patients with propylthiouracil-associated ANCA vasculitis with renal involvement.
[So] Source:J Nephrol;27(2):159-64, 2014 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1724-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively investigate clinico-pathological features and outcomes of patients with renal involvement in propylthiouracil (PTU)-associated antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) vasculitis (PTU-AAV). METHODS: Clinico-pathological features and outcomes of 12 patients (female 11, average age 32.4 13.8 years) who developed AAV after treatment with PTU were collected and analyzed. ANCA was detected by both immunofluorescence (IF) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All patients had renal biopsy. RESULTS: Twelve patients received PTU for 2-264 months (median 42 months) when PTUAAV was diagnosed. All patients had positive serum P-ANCA, 11 of them were MPO-ANCA, 1 was MPO and PR3-ANCA double positive. All patients presented with hematuria and proteinuria, 5 of them had gross hematuria, urine protein was 1.9 1.6 g/24 h, 7 of 12 (58.3%) patients had renal dysfunction, among them 3 needed initial renal replacement therapy. Renal biopsy showed pauci-immune segmental necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis in ten patients, segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis superimposed on membranous nephropathy in two patients. All patients withdrew PTU and received steroid and immunosuppressive therapy. After a median follow-up of 42 months (range 21-86), 3 patients developed to ESRD, 7 patients entered complete renal remission. Serum ANCA turned negative only in 2 patients, 10 patients had persistent positive serum ANCA. Three patients relapsed with the elevation of serum ANCA level. CONCLUSION: Renal damage of PTU-AAV could be pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis, and necrotizing glomerulonephritis coexisted with membranous nephropathy. Most patients had persistent positive serum ANCA and had a risk of relapse and progression to ESRD even after PTU withdrawal and immunosuppressive therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s40620-014-0063-2

  9 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24026790
[Au] Autor:Unger L; Wollina U; Machetanz J; Stelzner C; Schellong S
[Ad] Address:Medizinische Klinik 1, Krankenhaus Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Stdtisches Klinikum, Akademisches Lehrkrankenhaus der TU Dresden, Friedrichstr. 41, 01067, Dresden, Deutschland, unger-le@khdf.de.
[Ti] Title:Das verfrbte Bein. [Leg discoloration].
[So] Source:Internist (Berl);54(11):1314-22, 2013 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1289
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:Many patients present with discolouration of the legs or with non-ulcerating skin lesions, the most frequent causes being chronic venous insufficiency or other chronic or acute states of congestion. Erysipelas (cellulitis) is also a frequent example of a bacterial skin infection. A complex differential diagnosis arises from all types of immune-mediated skin lesions, opening up the broad spectrum of inflammatory systemic disease, such as vasculitis and sarcoidosis. Livedo like lesions and skin involvement in borreliosis are challenging to classify but of considerable clinical importance. The present review focuses on the description of underlying diseases as well as on diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Therapeutic considerations are discussed in less detail.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erysipelas/diagnosis
Leg Dermatoses/diagnosis
Livedo Reticularis/diagnosis
Lyme Disease/diagnosis
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis
Venous Insufficiency/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Color
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131122
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00108-013-3341-5

  10 / 31995 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23303591
[Au] Autor:Stolte M; Jatzwauk P; Bethke B
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pathology, Klinikum Kulmbach, Kulmbach, Germany.
[Ti] Title:The Churg-Strauss syndrome: diagnosed for the first time in a gastrectomy specimen.
[So] Source:Z Gastroenterol;51(6):573-5, 2013 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1439-7803
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS), first described in 1951 and characterised by eosinophilic inflammation and necrotising vasculitis in patients with asthma can in principle affect any organ. We report on a 47-year-old male patient, in whom the diagnosis of CSS was finally established for the first time on the basis of the histological work-up of a gastrectomy specimen. Endoscopic inspection had revealed a rigid gastric wall and a large irregularly shaped ulcer in the prepyloric antrum. Despite the fact that no carcinoma was demonstrable in the biopsy material, a gastrectomy was nevertheless performed since the endoscopic appearance was strongly suspicious for a carcinoma. The gastrectomy specimen revealed massive eosinophilic gastritis in combination with granulomas and necrotising vasculitis--localised mainly in the muscularis propria. In view of the subsequent information that the patient also suffered from asthma, the diagnosis of CSS (previously unrecognised) was established--for the first time--in the gastrectomy specimen.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Churg-Strauss Syndrome/pathology
Churg-Strauss Syndrome/surgery
Gastrectomy/methods
Stomach/pathology
Stomach/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0031-1273459


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