Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Veins [Words]
References found : 165345 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 16535 go to page                         

  1 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 27158911
[Au] Autor:Crystal HA; Holman S; Lui YW; Baird AE; Yu H; Klein R; Rojas-Soto DM; Gustafson DR; Stebbins GT
[Ad] Address:Departments of Neurology, SUNY Downstate Medical School, Brooklyn, NY, United States of America....
[Ti] Title:Association of the Fractal Dimension of Retinal Arteries and Veins with Quantitative Brain MRI Measures in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Women.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(5):e0154858, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The fractal dimension of retinal arteries and veins is a measure of the complexity of the vascular tree. We hypothesized that retinal fractal dimension would be associated with brain volume and white matter integrity in HIV-infected women. DESIGN: Nested case-control within longitudinal cohort study. METHODS: Women were recruited from the Brooklyn site of the Women's Interagency HIV study (WIHS); 34 HIV-infected and 21 HIV-uninfected women with analyzable MRIs and retinal photographs were included. Fractal dimension was determined using the SIVA software program on skeletonized retinal images. The relationship between predictors (retinal vascular measures) and outcomes (quantitative MRI measures) were analyzed with linear regression models. All models included age, intracranial volume, and both arterial and venous fractal dimension. Some models were adjusted for blood pressure, race/ethnicity, and HIV-infection. RESULTS: The women were 45.6 ± 7.3 years of age. Higher arterial dimension was associated with larger cortical volumes, but higher venous dimension was associated with smaller cortical volumes. In fully adjusted models, venous dimension was significantly associated with fractional anisotropy (standardized ß = -0.41, p = 0.009) and total gray matter volume (ß = -0.24, p = 0.03), and arterial dimension with mean diffusivity (ß = -0.33,.p = 0.04) and fractional anisotropy (ß = 0.34, p = 0.03). HIV-infection was not associated with any retinal or MRI measure. CONCLUSIONS: Higher venous fractal dimension was associated with smaller cortical volumes and lower fractional anisotropy, whereas higher arterial fractal dimension was associated with the opposite patterns. Longitudinal studies are needed to validate this finding.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0154858

  2 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 27136356
[Au] Autor:Hocking KM; Putumbaka G; Wise ES; Cheung-Flynn J; Brophy CM; Komalavilas P
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America....
[Ti] Title:Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein.
[So] Source:PLoS One;11(5):e0154460, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. APPROACH AND RESULTS: HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 µM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160514
[Lr] Last revision date:160514
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0154460

  3 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 26235536
[Au] Autor:Thakurdas SM; Lopez MF; Kakuda S; Fernandez-Valdivia R; Zarrin-Khameh N; Haltiwanger RS; Jafar-Nejad H
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX....
[Ti] Title:Jagged1 heterozygosity in mice results in a congenital cholangiopathy which is reversed by concomitant deletion of one copy of Poglut1 (Rumi).
[So] Source:Hepatology;63(2):550-65, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3350
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:UNLABELLED: Haploinsufficiency for the Notch ligand JAG1 in humans results in an autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder known as Alagille syndrome, which is characterized by a congenital cholangiopathy of variable severity. Here, we show that on a C57BL/6 background, jagged1 heterozygous mice (Jag1(+/-) ) exhibit impaired intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) development, decreased SOX9 expression, and thinning of the periportal vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) layer, which are apparent at embryonic day 18 and the first postnatal week. In contrast, mice double heterozygous for Jag1 and the glycosyltransferase, Poglut1 (Rumi), start showing a significant improvement in IHBD development and VSMC differentiation during the first week. At P30, Jag1(+/-) mice show widespread ductular reactions and ductopenia in liver and a mild, but statistically, significant bilirubinemia. In contrast, P30 Jag1/Rumi double-heterozygous mice show well-developed portal triads around most portal veins, with no elevation of serum bilirubin. Conditional deletion of Rumi in VSMCs results in progressive arborization of the IHBD tree, whereas deletion of Rumi in hepatoblasts frequently results in an increase in the number of hepatic arteries without affecting bile duct formation. Nevertheless, removing one copy of Rumi from either VSMCs or hepatoblasts is sufficient to partially suppress the Jag1(+/-) bile duct defects. Finally, all Rumi target sites of the human JAG1 are efficiently glucosylated, and loss of Rumi in VSMCs results in increased levels of full-length JAG1 and a shorter fragment of JAG1 without affecting Jag1 messenger RNA levels. CONCLUSIONS: On a C57BL/6 background, Jag1 haploinsufficiency results in bile duct paucity in mice. Removing one copy of Rumi suppresses the Jag1(+/-) bile duct phenotype, indicating that Rumi opposes JAG1 function in the liver. (Hepatology 2016;63:550-565).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Cu] Class update date: 160120
[Lr] Last revision date:160120
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/hep.28024

  4 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25735521
[Au] Autor:Gaba RC; Parvinian A; Minocha J; Casadaban LC; Knuttinen MG; Ray CE; Bui JT
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology and Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, 1740 W. Taylor St., MC 931, Chicago IL 60612. Electronic address: rgaba@uic.edu....
[Ti] Title:Should transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent grafts be underdilated?
[So] Source:J Vasc Interv Radiol;26(3):382-7, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1535-7732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although underdilation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) stent grafts is commonly performed to limit complications arising from excessive portosystemic shunting, it is uncertain whether underdilated stents retain their smaller diameter indefinitely or eventually expand to nominal caliber. In this investigation, postprocedure computed tomography (CT) was used to compare diameters of underdilated TIPSs and TIPSs expanded to a nominal diameter of 10 mm in 61 cases. The groups had comparable shunt diameters on post-TIPS imaging (9.8 mm vs 9.9 mm; P = .079), with similar incidences of hepatic encephalopathy (34% vs 20%; P = .372), indicating stent self-expansion over time, and bringing into question the advantages of underdilation for customization of shunt caliber.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dilatation/instrumentation
Hepatic Artery/radiography
Hepatic Veins/radiography
Portasystemic Shunt, Transjugular Intrahepatic/instrumentation
Portasystemic Shunt, Transjugular Intrahepatic/methods
Prosthesis Fitting/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dilatation/methods
Equipment Failure Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prosthesis Design
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150304
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25541420
[Au] Autor:Pieper CC; Sprinkart AM; Nadal J; Hippe V; Meyer C; Schild HH; Thomas D
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, Bonn 53105, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Postinterventional passive expansion of partially dilated transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stents.
[So] Source:J Vasc Interv Radiol;26(3):388-94, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1535-7732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To investigate passive transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) stent expansion in patients with intentional "underdilation" (eg, 10-mm stent, 8-mm balloon) during TIPS creation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Custom in-house software was developed for objective quantification of cross-sectional stent area from computed tomography (CT) data. The technique was validated by in vitro experiments. The study included 39 patients (22 men; mean age, 59.2 y) who underwent TIPS creation (VIATORR stent graft [W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Arizona]; n = 29; WALLSTENT endoprosthesis [Boston Scientific, Marlborough, Massachusetts], n = 10) with stent underdilation. Follow-up CT data of the patients were used to quantify in vivo stent area changes. Data were analyzed by variance analysis and entered into a general linear model to test for interrelations between stent area changes and clinical (eg, cirrhosis grade) and procedural parameters. RESULTS: In vitro validation of the in-house software showed good agreement and reproducibility without overestimation of stent area. Mean clinical follow-up time in patients was 787 days (range, 7-2,450 d). At the time of intervention, VIATORR stent grafts and WALLSTENT endoprostheses were dilated to an average of 64.4% ± 2.3% and 65.63% ± 8.52% of nominal area, respectively. At the last imaging follow-up evaluation, this value had increased in all stents to a mean of 87.8% ± 7.9% (VIATORR) and 82.34% ± 19.6% (WALLSTENT) in the TIPS tract (P < .05). Multivariate analysis revealed the time after intervention to be the only predictor of stent area in the TIPS tract. There was no significant association between stent expansion and clinical or procedure-related parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The area of self-expanding stents implanted in the liver for TIPS creation with dilation to less than nominal diameter significantly increases over time. This increase has to be considered as an additional factor influencing the long-term portosystemic gradient.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dilatation/instrumentation
Hepatic Artery/radiography
Hepatic Veins/radiography
Portasystemic Shunt, Transjugular Intrahepatic/instrumentation
Portasystemic Shunt, Transjugular Intrahepatic/methods
Prosthesis Fitting/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dilatation/methods
Equipment Failure Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Fitting/instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sensitivity and Specificity
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150304
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24573992
[Au] Autor:Prieto C; Doneva M; Usman M; Henningsson M; Greil G; Schaeffter T; Botnar RM
[Ad] Address:King's College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London, UK; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Escuela de Ingeniería, Santiago, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Highly efficient respiratory motion compensated free-breathing coronary MRA using golden-step Cartesian acquisition.
[So] Source:J Magn Reson Imaging;41(3):738-46, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1522-2586
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To develop an efficient 3D affine respiratory motion compensation framework for Cartesian whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The proposed method achieves 100% scan efficiency by estimating the affine respiratory motion from the data itself and correcting the acquired data in the reconstruction process. For this, a golden-step Cartesian sampling with spiral profile ordering was performed to enable reconstruction of respiratory resolved images at any breathing position and with different respiratory window size. Affine motion parameters were estimated from image-based registration of 3D undersampled respiratory resolved images reconstructed with iterative SENSE and motion correction was performed directly in the reconstruction using a multiple-coils generalized matrix formulation method. This approach was tested on healthy volunteers and compared against a conventional diaphragmatic navigator-gated acquisition using quantitative and qualitative image quality assessment. RESULTS: The proposed approach achieved 47 ± 12% and 59 ± 6% vessel sharpness for the right (RCA) and left (LAD) coronary arteries, respectively. Also, good quality visual scores of 2.4 ± 0.74 and 2.44 ± 0.86 were observed for the RCA and LAD (scores from 0, no to 4, excellent coronary vessel delineation). A not statically significant difference (P = 0.05) was found between the proposed method and an 8-mm navigator-gated and tracked scan, although scan efficiency increased from 61 ± 10% to 100%. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of a new 3D affine respiratory motion correction technique for Cartesian whole-heart CMRA that achieves 100% scan efficiency and therefore a predictable acquisition time. This approach yields image quality comparable to that of an 8-mm navigator-gated acquisition with lower scan efficiency. Further evaluation of this technique in patients is now warranted to determine its clinical use.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coronary Vessels/physiology
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods
Magnetic Resonance Angiography/methods
Respiratory-Gated Imaging Techniques/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Artifacts
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Male
Motion
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150219
[Lr] Last revision date:150219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jmri.24602

  7 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25367809
[Au] Autor:Katsanos S; Debonnaire P; van der Kley F; van Rosendael PJ; Joyce E; de Graaf MA; Schalij MJ; Scholte AJ; Bax JJ; Ajmone Marsan N; Delgado V
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Position of Edwards SAPIEN transcatheter valve in the aortic root in relation with the coronary ostia: implications for percutaneous coronary interventions.
[So] Source:Catheter Cardiovasc Interv;85(3):480-7, 2015 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1522-726X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To determine the implications of stable coverage of the coronary ostia by the Edwards SAPIEN valve frame in terms of myocardial ischemia and subsequent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). BACKGROUND: Edwards SAPIEN frame is frequently deployed relatively higher than recommended and may overlap the coronary ostia. METHODS: A total of 142 patients (age 81 ± 7 years, male 49%) treated with Edwards SAPIEN valve and with multi-detector row computed tomography at 1 month follow-up were evaluated. The position of the frame in relation to the coronary ostia was assessed. Levels of troponin T were measured 12-24 hr after TAVI. PCI events at follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: The left coronary ostium was fully covered in three (2.1%) patients and the right coronary ostium in 11 (7.7%). There were no differences in troponin T levels between patients with fully covered ostia versus patients with partly or non-covered ostia (0.24 (0.13-0.50) µg/L versus 0.35 (0.15-0.55) µg/L, respectively; P = 0.377). At 30 ± 15 months follow up, 10 (7%) patients underwent successful PCI. Rate of subsequent PCI was similar between patients with any covered ostium and patients with non-covered ostia [4 (7.8%) vs. 6 (6.5%), P = 0.780, respectively]. CONCLUSIONS: Full overlap of the coronary ostia by Edwards SAPIEN frame is infrequent and in most cases does not limit subsequent PCI.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aortic Valve
Cardiac Catheterization/instrumentation
Coronary Artery Disease/therapy
Coronary Vessels
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/instrumentation
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve/radiography
Biological Markers/blood
Cardiac Catheterization/adverse effects
Cardiac Catheterization/methods
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease/blood
Coronary Artery Disease/radiography
Coronary Vessels/radiography
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods
Humans
Male
Multidetector Computed Tomography
Netherlands
Prosthesis Design
Registries
Time Factors
Troponin T/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Troponin T)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ccd.25718

  8 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24976000
[Au] Autor:Rowe R; Parviz Y; Iqbal J; Heppenstall J; Teare D; Gunn J
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, England, United Kingdom; Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Repeat coronary angiography with previously normal arteries: a futile exercise?
[So] Source:Catheter Cardiovasc Interv;85(3):401-5, 2015 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1522-726X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Up to 20% of coronary angiograms reveal normal arteries. How long they stay normal is poorly understood. This study investigated the fate of normal coronary arteries and determined the rate of development of coronary artery disease. METHODS: We interrogated the angiographic archive of the South Yorkshire Cardiothoracic Centre between 2004 and 2013 to identify patients with truly normal coronary arteries who underwent repeat coronary angiography more than 1 year later. Follow up angiograms were scored for the severity and extent of CAD (graded per segment as 0%, 1-50%, >50%). Risk factors for the development of coronary artery disease were documented. Univariate predictors of disease development were identified and entered into a logistic regression model to identify independent predictors. RESULTS: Out of over 25,000 angiographic procedures in the archives we found 6068 patients reported to have normal coronary arteries. Of these, 162 patients had also undergone subsequent repeat coronary angiography. Of these, 97 had truly normal (smooth) coronary arteries at baseline and had undergone repeat angiography >1 year later. At a median 51 months, 87 continued to have normal arteries, and all the remaining 10 had mild disease only (average 37% stenosis in an average 1.2 segments). No patients developed any significant (>50% stenosis) disease. Advanced age, time between angiograms, and smoking status were identified as independent predictors of development of CAD. CONCLUSIONS: Truly normal coronary arteries do not progress to significant disease within a time frame of 4 years. Repeat coronary angiography within that period is probably not indicated.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease/radiography
Coronary Stenosis/radiography
Coronary Vessels/radiography
Unnecessary Procedures
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Artery Disease/etiology
Coronary Stenosis/etiology
Disease Progression
England
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Predictive Value of Tests
Radiology Information Systems
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 150708
[Lr] Last revision date:150708
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ccd.25589

  9 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24905333
[Au] Autor:Devanagondi R; Tapio JB; Grifka RG
[Ad] Address:Division of Pediatric Cardiology, C. S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
[Ti] Title:Transcatheter occlusion of large pulmonary arteriovenous malformations using multiple devices in a neonate.
[So] Source:Catheter Cardiovasc Interv;85(3):430-4, 2015 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1522-726X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) are usually well-tolerated hemodynamically. Rarely, they cause severe neonatal cyanosis, requiring urgent treatment. We report the use of multiple transcatheter vascular occlusion devices to reduce right-to-left shunting in a neonate with multiple, large PAVMs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arteriovenous Fistula/therapy
Cardiac Catheterization/instrumentation
Pulmonary Artery/abnormalities
Pulmonary Veins/abnormalities
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Arteriovenous Fistula/complications
Arteriovenous Fistula/radiography
Cyanosis/diagnosis
Cyanosis/etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Pulmonary Artery/radiography
Pulmonary Veins/radiography
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ccd.25561

  10 / 165345 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25463332
[Au] Autor:Korkmaz K; Gedik HS; Yalçinkaya A; Yener AÜ; Diken AI; Çagli K
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Numune Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, Ankara, Türkiye....
[Ti] Title:Use of a superficial femoral artery autograft as a femoral vein replacement.
[So] Source:Ann Vasc Surg;29(2):364.e19-21, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1615-5947
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are common complications of vascular penetrating trauma. Here we present a case of a 59-year-old woman who had a history of gunshot injury 42 years ago causing AVF between superficial femoral artery (SFA) and superficial femoral vein (SFV). SFV was resected. Ipsilateral SFA was used to restore SFV. SFA was reconstituted using a 7-mm polytetrafluorethylene graft. The patient has normal venous and arterial flow at 3- and 15-month follow-up.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arteriovenous Fistula/surgery
Femoral Artery/transplantation
Femoral Vein/injuries
Femoral Vein/surgery
Wounds, Gunshot/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Arteriovenous Fistula/etiology
Autografts
Biocompatible Materials
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation
Chronic Disease
Femoral Artery/injuries
Femoral Artery/surgery
Fluorocarbon Polymers
Humans
Time Factors
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biocompatible Materials); 0 (Fluorocarbon Polymers); 56093-67-5 (polytetrafluoroethane)
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150202
[St] Status:MEDLINE


page 1 of 16535 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information