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[PMID]: 26944696
[Au] Autor:Markl M; Schnell S; Wu C; Bollache E; Jarvis K; Barker AJ; Robinson JD; Rigsby CK
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. Electronic address: mmarkl@northwestern.edu....
[Ti] Title:Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.
[So] Source:Clin Radiol;71(8):779-95, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1365-229X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Cu] Class update date: 160702
[Lr] Last revision date:160702
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26934164
[Au] Autor:Tanabe H; Takahashi T; Murayama R; Yabunaka K; Oe M; Matsui Y; Arai R; Uchida M; Komiyama C; Sanada H
[Ad] Address:University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Nursing Technology, Tokyo, Japan (Drs Murayama and Oe, Mr Tanabe and Ms Arai); University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Tokyo, Japan (Drs Yabunaka and Sanada, Mr Takahashi); Kanazawa Medical University, School of Nursing, Kanazawa, Japan (Dr Matsui); University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (Mss Uchida and Komiyama); and Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan (Mr Tanabe and Ms Arai). Hidenori Tanabe, ME, is a collaborative researcher in the Department of Advanced Nursing Technology in the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Tokyo in Tokyo, Japan. He is also a research associate at Terumo Corporation in Tokyo. Toshiaki Takahashi, MHS, RN, is a student in the Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management in the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Ryoko Murayama, PhD, RN, RMW, is a project associate professor in the Department of Advanced Nursing Technology in the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Tokyo in Tokyo, Japan. Koichi Yabunaka, PhD, RT, is an assistant professor in the Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management in the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Tokyo in Tokyo, Japan. Makoto Oe, PhD, RN, is a project lecturer in the Department of Advanced Nursing Technology in the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Tokyo in Tokyo, Japan. Yuko Matsui, PhD, RN, is an associate professor in the School of Nursing at Kanazawa Medical University in Kanazawa, Japan. Rika Arai, MS, is a collaborative researcher in the Department of Advanced Nursing Technology in the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Tokyo in Tokyo, Japan, and is a research associate at Terumo Corporation in Tokyo. Miho Uchida, MSI, RN, is a vice director of nursing department at the University of Tokyo Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Chieko Komiyama,
[Ti] Title:Using Ultrasonography for Vessel Diameter Assessment to Prevent Infiltration.
[So] Source:J Infus Nurs;39(2):105-11, 2016 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1539-0667
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Small veins are a risk factor for infiltration. However, there are no data regarding the ideal vein diameter for preventing infiltration. Using ultrasound, vessel diameter and calculated ratios of the vessel diameter to the catheter gauge were measured. The relationship between the ratio and infiltration was assessed to establish a cutoff point. The mean ratio of the infiltration group was significantly smaller than that of the no-infiltration group (P < .01), and the ratio was an independent risk factor according to the multivariable analysis. The ratio of 3.3 was determined to be the cutoff point that enables health care professionals to identify veins appropriately.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:N
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/NAN.0000000000000159

  3 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26934133
[Au] Autor:Liu X; Huang P; Wang J; Yang Z; Huang S; Luo X; Qi J; Shen X; Zhong Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated Medical School, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China....
[Ti] Title:The Effect of A2A Receptor Antagonist on Microglial Activation in Experimental Glaucoma.
[So] Source:Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci;57(3):776-86, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1552-5783
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist on microglial activation and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under chronic ocular hypertension (COH), and explored the relationship between microglial activation and RGC survival by means of in vitro and in vivo experiments. METHODS: An animal model of COH was induced in one eye of male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by ligation of three episcleral veins. The survival of RGCs and the activation of microglia under COH without or with intravitreous injection of A2AR antagonist ZM241385 were assessed by fluorescent labeling, real time PCR and Western blot. ELISA was used to measure the secretion of inflammatory mediators by microglia when glutamate and/or ZM241385 was added into the culture system. RESULTS: Compared to the baseline, RGC density 2 weeks after COH induction decreased at the central (2436 ± 143 cells/mm2 pre- and 2130 ± 148 cells/mm2 post-COH induction) and peripheral (2219 ± 140 cells/mm2 pre- and 1953 ± 142 cells/mm2 post-COH induction) retina. The microglia changed their ramified morphology to an amoeboid form with increase in TNF-α and IL-1ß expression after COH. These changes, however, were ameliorated with intravitreous ZM241385 (RGC density only dropped to 2287 ± 135 cells/mm2). The upregulation of those proinflammatory cytokines secreted by microglia in vitro under high concentration of glutamate was downregulated when ZM241385 was added into the culture system. CONCLUSIONS: A2AR antagonist ZM241385 could reduce the activation of microglia and downregulate the proinflammatory cytokines expression under the conditions of COH and high concentration of glutamate, which may be one of the mechanisms that protected RGCs in experimental glaucoma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1603
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1167/iovs.15-18024

  4 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27283015
[Au] Autor:Olivieri M; Kurnik K; Hoffmann F; Reiter K; Bidlingmaier C; Kuhlencordt P; Treitl M
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Hemostaseology, and martin.olivieri@med.uni-muenchen.de....
[Ti] Title:Ultrasound Assisted Endovascular Thrombolysis in Adolescents: 2 Case Reports.
[So] Source:Pediatrics;138(1), 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1098-4275
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Descending iliofemoral thrombosis in children is a rare event. Anticoagulation therapy with low-molecular-weight-heparin is standard of care. However, patency cannot be achieved in all cases, increasing the risk for rethrombosis and postthrombotic syndrome. To reduce the risk of venous valve failure in adults, local catheter-directed thrombolysis is used to reopen vessels. Two adolescent girls (17 and 15 years old) presented with acute descending iliofemoral thrombosis of the left common iliac, external, and common femoral veins. Anticoagulation with enoxaparin was started until insertion of an EkoSonic Mach 4e catheter for ultrasound-assisted local thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and administration of unfractionated heparin. Success was monitored by increases in D-dimer levels and ultrasound findings. After 24 hours respectively 48 hours, complete recanalization was obtained. No complication occurred except minimal local bleeding. Screening for hereditary thrombophilia revealed a heterozygous antithrombin mutation in 1 girl (ie, the 15-year-old). May-Thurner syndrome was identified in both girls, necessitating stenting of the left common iliac veins and continuation of anticoagulation therapy with enoxaparin and acetylsalicylic acid. No rethrombosis or complications occurred during the follow-up period. Ultrasound-assisted catheter-directed local thrombolysis with the EkoSonic Mach 4e system was effective in achieving immediate recanalization of the occluded veins and should be considered in children experiencing descending iliofemoral thrombosis. The fast recanalization might reduce the incidence of postthrombotic syndrome. May-Thurner syndrome is regularly found in these patients, and if present, requires stenting of the common iliac vein to avoid early reocclusion. However, long-term patency of iliac vein stenting in children remains to be examined.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26046959
[Au] Autor:Belcaro G; Dugall M; Corsi M; Agus GB; Ippolito E
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Sciences, Irvine3 Circulation/Vascular Labs, PAP/PEA Project, Chieti-Pescara, Italy - cardres@abol.it.
[Ti] Title:Superficial venous incompetence: low-cost outpatient minisurgery, sclerotherapy and combined procedure as a management plan. Costs and efficacy. A 20-year, follow-up registry.
[So] Source:Minerva Chir;71(4):223-32, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1626
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This registry study evaluated low-cost outpatient surgery (mini-S) for venous insufficiency as an alternative to stripping. METHODS: This 20-year follow-up is focused on the recurrence of varices and on the long-term efficacy of the mini-S (group 1) in comparison with controls (2, stripping), sclerotherapy (3) or a combination of mini-S+sclerotherapy (4). Costs were compared. RESULTS: At 20-years of follow-up, considering recurrence/development of new varicose veins, 24.05% of the limbs treated with mini-S developed new varices in comparison with 64.4% in group 2, 24.1% in group 3 and 15.4% in group 4 (P<0.05). New surgical procedures were needed in 18.9% of mini-S patients vs. 58.5% in group 2, 21.9% in group 3 and 19.7% in group 4 (P<0.05 between group 2 and the other groups). Sclerotherapy (in the years following the initial treatment) was used in 37.9% of mini-S patients in comparison with 67.7% of subjects in group 2 patients, 33.1% in group 3 and 22.8% in group 4 (P<0.05 between outpatient treatment and group 2). The superficial venous system was incompetent in 21% of mini-S patients in comparison with 38.8% in group 2 (P<0.05), 20.7% in group 3 and 17.9% of group 4. At 20 years edema was present in 10.5% of limbs in group 2 in comparison with a <3% (range 2.2-2.1%) in the other groups. Edema was more significant after stripping. Ambulatory venous pressure measurements in subgroups was lower in groups 1, 3 and 4 with a lower refilling time (P<0.05). The cost of in-hospital, daily surgical treatments were €1978 (covered by the heathcare provider). The cost of mini-S was on average €488 per limb (covered by patients). CONCLUSIONS: Outpatients procedures, in particular the mini-S management plan, were cheaper than stripping and more effective at 20-years follow-up. They could be a model for emerging contries with restricted budgets for vein surgery. Also being cheaper more people may have benefits from treatment when/where hospital procedures are not covered by an healthcare provider.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24153192
[Au] Autor:Kazibudzki M; Latacz P; Ludyga T; Simka M
[Ad] Address:Euromedic Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery, Katowice, Poland - mariansimka@poczta.onet.pl.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy and safety of cutting balloons for the treatment of obstructive lesions in the internal jugular veins.
[So] Source:J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino);57(4):514-8, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0021-9509
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In this technical note we present the results of endovascular treatment for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency with the use of cutting balloons, with focus on feasibility and safety of these endovascular devices. METHODS: We used cutting balloons during 70 procedures in 65 multiple sclerosis patients presenting with strictures of the internal jugular veins, primarily at the level of jugular valves. These devices were used only in selected cases, following unsuccessful standard balloon angioplasty, and on condition that commercially available devices could be applied (currently they are maximally 8 mm in diameter). RESULTS: In all cases the perioperative course was uneventful, with no serious adverse events. Immediate technical success rate was 94.3%. In four cases (5.7%) cutting-balloon angioplasty alone was unsuccessful and stents were implanted. Primary, assisted primary and secondary patency rates after 6 months were: 94%, 98.5%, and 98.5%, respectively. Follow-up has revealed that out of the remaining 66 angioplasties four procedures failed (failure rate: 6.1%): in two patients stents were implanted, in one patient successful redo cutting-balloon angioplasty was performed, while in another case the treated segment of jugular vein totally occluded and was not feasible to reopen endovascularly. CONCLUSIONS: Cutting balloons can be safely used for the management of stenosed internal jugular veins. These devices can replace stents in the majority of cases, especially if standard balloon angioplasty is insufficient to restore proper outflow. However, the use of cutting balloons in this particular venous territory is limited by the fact that currently only small diameter devices are available.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27368445
[Au] Autor:Gitomer SA; Giannoni CM; Cañadas KT
[Ad] Address:Baylor College of Medicine, Bobby R. Alford Department of Otolaryngology, Houston, TX, USA.
[Ti] Title:Pediatric lymphedema caused by diffuse cervical lymphadenopathy: A case report and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;87:67-70, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pediatric head and neck lymphedema is rare and there have not been any reported cases in children. Here we discuss severe, diffuse head and neck lymphedema in a child caused by compression of the internal jugular veins by lymphadenopathy from Kawasaki's disease. With steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, the lymphadenopathy improved and facial edema slowly resolved. In review of the literature, complications of head and neck lymphedema including airway obstruction and blindness are discussed. This case highlights the importance of the pediatric otolaryngologist considering lymphedema as a cause for facial swelling and monitoring for complications of lymphedema.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26934561
[Au] Autor:Griffin M; Bond D; Nicolaides A
[Ad] Address:The Vascular Noninvasive Diagnostic Centre, London, UK - maurabgriffin@googlemail.com.
[Ti] Title:Measurement of blood flow in the deep veins of the lower limb using the geko™ neuromuscular electro-stimulation device.
[So] Source:Int Angiol;35(4):406-10, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1839
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A previous study using electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve (geko™) to activate the venous muscle pump measured blood flow in both the femoral and popliteal veins. Increased blood flow by as much as 60% was demonstrated in the femoral vein. Such an increase is assumed to be as a result of an increase in venous flow from the deep calf veins; however this has yet to be confirmed. The aim of this study was to conduct direct measurements in these deep calf veins to confirm this assumption in healthy individuals. METHODS: This was a single centre open-label intra-subject healthy volunteer comparison of blood flow in the peroneal, posterior tibial and gastrocnemial veins with and without the geko™ device. The device was applied to 18 volunteers. Peak venous velocity (PV) and ejected volume per individual stimulus (VS) and volume flow (VF) was determined using ultrasound. RESULTS: Peak velocity (PV) increased 216% in the peroneal vein, by 112% in the posterior tibial vein and by 137% in the gastrocnemial vein (P<0.001). Ejected volume per stimulus increased by 113% in the peroneal vein, by 38% in the posterior tibial vein and by 50% in the gastrocnemial vein (P<0.003). Associated volume flows during the muscle contraction were increased by 36%, 25% and 17%, respectively (P=0.05) CONCLUSIONS: This is the first time that neuromuscular electro-stimulation has been shown to be an effective method of increasing flow in the axial deep veins of the calf. Significant increases in velocity and volume flow in response to the electrical stimulus were seen in all three veins studied. Enhancements of both blood velocity and volume flow are key factors in the prevention of venous stasis and ultimately deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Further studies are justified to determine the efficacy of the device in the prevention of DVT.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26513272
[Au] Autor:Burgansky-Eliash Z; Bartov E; Barak A; Grinvald A; Gaton D
[Ad] Address:a Department of Ophthalmology , The Edith Wolfson Medical Center , Holon , Israel....
[Ti] Title:Blood-Flow Velocity in Glaucoma Patients Measured with the Retinal Function Imager.
[So] Source:Curr Eye Res;41(7):965-70, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2202
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Circulatory abnormalities in the retina, optic nerve and choroid have been detected by various technologies in glaucoma patients. However, there is no clear understanding of the role of blood flow in glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to compare retinal blood-flow velocities using the retinal function imager (RFI) between glaucoma and healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-nine eyes of 46 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), 51 eyes of 31 healthy individuals and 28 eyes of 23 patients with glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) but normal perimetry were recruited for this study. Three eyes of 2 patients in the glaucoma group and 2 eyes of 1 patient in the GON group had normal pressure at the time of diagnosis. Eighty-three percent of the glaucoma patients and 73% of the patients in the GON group were treated with anti-glaucoma medications. All patients were scanned by the RFI. Differences among groups were assessed by mixed linear models. RESULTS: The average venous velocity in the GON group (3.8 mm/s) was significantly faster than in the glaucoma (3.3 mm/s, p = 0.03) and healthy (3.0 mm/s, p = 0.005) groups. The arterial velocity in the GON group was not different from any of the other study groups (4.7 mm/s). The arterial and venous velocity in the POAG eyes was not different than in the healthy eyes (arterial: 4.3 versus 4.2 mm/s, p = 0.7; venous: 3.3 versus 3.0 mm/s, p = 0.3). A subgroup of 13 glaucoma patients who had perimetric glaucoma in 1 eye and normal visual field (VF) in the fellow eye showed a trend of lower velocity in the glaucoma eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in retinal blood-flow velocity were detected only in the pre-perimetric state, but not in perimetric glaucoma. These findings might represent early dysregulation in the retinal vasculature.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/02713683.2015.1080278

  10 / 166430 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27177710
[Au] Autor:Mousa AY; Broce M; Yacoub M; AbuRahma AF
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University, Charleston, WV. Electronic address: amousa@hsc.wvu.edu....
[Ti] Title:Iliac Vein Interrogation Augments Venous Ulcer Healing in Patients Who Have Failed Standard Compression Therapy along with Pathological Venous Closure.
[So] Source:Ann Vasc Surg;34:144-51, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1615-5947
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Treatment of venous ulcers is demanding for patients, as well as clinicians, and the investigation of underlying venous hypertension is the cornerstone of therapy. We propose that occult iliac vein stenosis should be ruled out by iliac vein interrogation (IVI) in patients with advanced venous stasis. METHODS: We conducted a systematic retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients who presented with CEAP (clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathophysiological) 6 venous disease. All patients had great saphenous vein ablation, compressive treatment, wound care (including Unna boot compression), and perforator closure using ablation therapy. Iliac vein stenosis was defined as ≥50% stenosis in cross-sectional surface area on intravascular ultrasound. Primary outcomes include time of venous ulcer healing and/or measurable change in the Venous Clinical Severity Score. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients with CEAP 6 venous disease met the inclusion criteria (active ulcers >1.5 cm in diameter). The average age and body mass index were 62.2 ± 9.2 years and 41.7 ± 16.7, respectively. The majority were female (72.7%) with common comorbidities, such as hyperlipidemia (54.5%), hypertension (36.4%), and diabetes mellitus (27.3%). Twenty-nine ulcers with an average diameter of 3.4 ± 1.9 cm and a depth of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm were treated. The majority of the ulcers occurred on the left limb (n = 17, 58.6%). Average perforator venous reflux was 3.6 ± 0.8 sec, while common femoral reflux was 1.8 ± 1.6. The majority (n = 19, 64.5%) of the perforator veins were located at the base of the ulcer, while the remainder (n = 10, 34.5%) were within 2 cm from the base. Of the 13 patients who underwent IVI, 8 patients (61.5%) had stenosis >50% that was corrected with iliac vein angioplasty and stenting (IVAS). There was a strong trend toward shorter healing time in the IVI group (7.9 ± 9.5 weeks) than for patients in the no iliac vein interrogation (NIVI) group (20.2 ± 15.3 weeks, P = 0.055). The final VCCS score was not significantly different (IVI = 7.9 ± 9.5 vs. NIVI = 10.0 ± 6.5, P = 0.578). However, compared with the NIVI group, the healing time for patients who actually received IVAS was marginally lower (5.8 ± 3.6 weeks, P = 0.075) and final VCCS was significantly lower (2.4 ± 2.9, P = 0.031). Veins that received IVI and IVAS remained patent and the associated ulcers were healed (100%). CONCLUSION: The small sample size and retrospective design limit the strength of the conclusions but the findings suggest that further studies are needed to define the exact role of IVI including angioplasty/stenting for patients with chronic venous ulcers.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1607
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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