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[PMID]: 24796505
[Au] Autor:Strózecki P; Flisinski M; Serafin Z; Wiechecka-Korenkiewicz J; Manitius J
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology, Hypertension and Internal Medicine, The Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Dr. Antoni Jurasz University Hospital No.1, Bydgoszcz, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Abdominal collateral vein as an unconventional vascular access for hemodialysis in patient with central vein occlusion.
[So] Source:Semin Dial;27(4):E48-50, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1525-139X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 65-year-old female patient with chronic kidney disease stage 5 and a history of spleen neoplasm with dissemination within peritoneum is presented. During 5 years of hemodialysis therapy, bilateral occlusion of brachiocephalic and iliac vein developed as a consequence of vein catheterization. An attempt to cannulate inferior vena cava was unsuccessful. A cannulation of dilated collateral abdominal veins with dialysis needles allowed to perform several hemodialysis sessions in the patient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/sdi.12244

  2 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24115149
[Au] Autor:Macgowan CK; Chan KY; Laughlin S; Marrie RA; Banwell B
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto/Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto/Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Cerebral arterial and venous blood flow in adolescent multiple sclerosis patients and age-matched controls using phase contrast MRI.
[So] Source:J Magn Reson Imaging;40(2):341-7, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1522-2586
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Altered cerebrovascular blood flow has been proposed as a mechanism for multiple sclerosis (MS). The primary objective of this study was to measure arterial and venous blood flow in adolescent MS patients and healthy controls (HC), in whom confounding factors such as age and lifestyle are less influential. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure flow in 26 MS patients and 26 controls aged 17.7 ± 1.8 and 17.8 ± 2.1 years, respectively. Flow was measured in the left and right internal carotid arteries (ICA), vertebral arteries (VA), internal jugular veins (IJV), and epidural veins (EV). Eighteen MS patients returned for a second MRI examination after 6 months. In all participants, ultrasound criteria for chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) were also evaluated. RESULTS: Flows (mL/min) in the MS group versus HC group were as follows: right ICA = 262 ± 57 vs. 263 ± 32, left ICA = 260 ± 67 vs. 270 ± 36, right VA = 96 ± 50 vs. 103 ± 30, left VA = 104 ± 37 vs. 118 ± 41, right IJV = 342 ± 180 vs. 345 ± 195, left IJV = 190 ± 131 vs. 250 ± 148, right EV = 33 ± 29 vs. 48 ± 43, and left EV = 36 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 28 (P > 0.17 for all comparisons). In MS participants, a nonsignificant trend to lower flow in the left IJV was observed, and the flow pulsatility index in the epidural veins was higher. Two MS participants met ultrasound criteria for CCSVI, but no significant difference in flow was detected. CONCLUSION: No population difference in flow rate was detected in adolescent MS participants relative to age-matched controls. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2014;40:341-347. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/jmri.24388

  3 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24913955
[Au] Autor:Eguchi S; Soyama A; Takatsuki M; Hidaka M; Adachi T; Kitasato A; Baimakhanov Z; Kuroki T
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8501, Japan. sueguchi@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:How to explant a diseased liver for living donor liver transplantation after previous gastrectomy with severe adhesion (with video).
[So] Source:J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Sci;21(8):E62-4, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1868-6982
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We performed living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in a patient who had undergone distal gastrectomy for gastric ulcer disease with Billroth I reconstruction 30 years before the LDLT. The adhesion was very severe between remnant stomach and hepatic hilum as well as left liver lobe with shortening of hepatoduodenal structures. After dissection of the infrahepatic inferior vena cava, the Spiegel lobe was identified from the dorsal side. The Spiegel lobe was then penetrated with a right angle dissector so that a plastic tape could be placed around the whole adhesion, including important structures in the hepatoduodenal ligament. Next, the right hepatic vein was transected with a vascular stapler using Pringle's maneuver using the plastic tape to fasten the entire adhesional structure. Subsequently, the trunk of the middle and left hepatic vein was transected after clamping. The remaining short hepatic veins in the left side were divided completely from the cranial to the caudal direction to dissect Spiegel's lobe. Finally, the hepatoduodenal ligament was identified from the attached remnant stomach and the duodenum and a vascular clamp was placed on the entire hepatoduaodenal ligament. Finally, the diseased liver was explanted for graft implantation. Thus, retrograde explantation of the liver was effective in decreasing the risk of damaging vital elements in the hepatoduodenal ligament, the remnant stomach, and the duodenum.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/jhbp.120

  4 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24616395
[Au] Autor:Endo I; Matsuyama R; Mori R; Taniguchi K; Kumamoto T; Takeda K; Tanaka K; Köhn A; Schenk A
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0004, Japan. endoit@med.yokohama-cu.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Imaging and surgical planning for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma.
[So] Source:J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Sci;21(8):525-32, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1868-6982
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recent advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) offer several benefits for management of perihilar tumors. Resection planning for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma should consider two factors: safety and curability. Recognition of individual anatomic variations is particularly important for avoiding intraoperative injury. In particular, hepatic arterial variations often restrict resection procedures. Extent of both longitudinal and vertical invasion by biliary tumors can be estimated from multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images. Longitudinal extent of resection can be planned based on two anatomic landmarks, the U point and the P point, readily identifiable in preoperative 3-dimensional (3D) images and by intraoperative inspection. Concerning vertical invasion, when direct vascular invasion is suspected from a finding of attachment of tumor and vessels such as portal veins and/or hepatic arteries without a thin low-density plane of separation shown by MPR, these vessels should be resected en bloc with the tumor. Surgical team members can plan and simulate details of vascular resection and reconstruction using 3D images. Reduced operative morbidity and increased R0 resection rates are expected because of better planning of procedures. These techniques soon may increase long-term survival for patients with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/jhbp.75

  5 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24931534
[Au] Autor:Cantalapiedra-Hijar G; Lemosquet S; Rodriguez-Lopez JM; Messad F; Ortigues-Marty I
[Ad] Address:Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, UMR 1213 INRA-VetAgroSup, Unité Mixte de Recherches sur les Herbivores, 63122 St Genès Champanelle, France. Electronic address: gonzalo.cantalapiedra@clermont.inra.fr....
[Ti] Title:Diets rich in starch increase the posthepatic availability of amino acids in dairy cows fed diets at low and normal protein levels.
[So] Source:J Dairy Sci;97(8):5151-66, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1525-3198
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Five mid-lactation multicatheterized Jersey cows were used in a 4×4 Latin square design to investigate whether the increase in milk N yield associated with diets rich in starch versus fiber could originate from changes in the splanchnic AA metabolism and if these changes depended upon the dietary crude protein (CP) content. Four isoenergetic diets were formulated to provide 2 different carbohydrate compositions [diets rich in starch (350g of starch and 310g of neutral detergent fiber/kg of dry matter) versus rich in fiber (45g of starch and 460g of neutral detergent fiber/kg of dry matter)] crossed by 2 different CP contents (12.0 vs. 16.5% CP). At the end of each treatment period, 6 hourly blood samples were collected from the portal and hepatic veins as well as the mesenteric artery to determine net nutrient fluxes across the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver, and total splanchnic tissues. Dry matter and calculated energy intake as well as total absorbed energy were similar across treatments. However, the net portal appearance (NPA) of acetate, total volatile fatty acids, and ß-hydroxybutyrate were higher with diets rich in fiber versus starch, whereas that of oxygen, glucose, butyrate, and insulin were lower. Concomitant to these changes, the percentage of N intake recovered as total AA (TAA) in the portal vein was lower for diets rich in fiber versus starch (42.3 vs. 51.4%, respectively), without, however, any difference observed in the NPA of the main AA used as energy fuels by the PDV (Glu, Gln, and Asp). Despite a higher NPA of TAA with starch versus fiber diets, no differences in the net hepatic flux of TAA, essential and nonessential AA were observed, resulting in a higher (+22%) net splanchnic release of AA and, hence, a greater (+7%) milk N yield. The net hepatic flux and hepatic fractional removal of none of the individual AA was affected as the main carbohydrate changed from fiber to starch, except for Gly and Lys, which were higher for the latter. After correcting for differences in NPA of TAA, the net hepatic uptake of TAA tended to be lower with starch versus fiber diets. The higher transfer of N from feed to milk with diets rich in starch is not the consequence of a direct sparing AA effect of glucogenic diets but rather the result of lower energy requirements by the PDV along with a higher microbial N flow to the duodenum. A better AA use by peripheral tissues with starch versus fiber diets was also hypothesized but more studies are warranted to clarify this issue.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24641352
[Au] Autor:Dhillon PS; Domenichini G; Gonna H; Bastiaenen R; Norman M; Gallagher MM
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, St. Georges Hospital, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous pulmonary vein isolation and cavotricuspid isthmus ablation using cryotherapy.
[So] Source:J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol;25(7):714-8, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1540-8167
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI) ablation are often performed as part of the same procedure. In many cases, PVI is performed by cryotherapy and then CTI ablation by radiofrequency (RF) energy. We sought to determine whether it is more efficient to perform CTI ablation simultaneously with PVI using separate cryogenerators. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed cryoablation of the CTI during PVI with the Arctic Front cryoballoon in 25 consecutive patients with clinical indications for both (PVI/CTI-cryo group). Procedural data were compared to those of 25 matched patients who underwent PVI only by the same operator (PVI-only group), and 25 patients who underwent PVI by cryotherapy and CTI ablation using RF energy sequentially during the same procedure (PVI/CTI-mixed group). No complication occurred. All veins were isolated; bidirectional CTI block was demonstrated in all cases where it was attempted, except for 1 patient in the PVI/CTI-mixed group. Procedure and fluoroscopy duration were significantly shorter in the PVI/CTI-cryo group (162 ± 34 and 24 ± 5 minutes) than in the PVI/CTI-mixed group (209 ± 46 minutes, P < 0.001 and 59 ± 28 minutes, P < 0.001). Procedure and fluoroscopy duration in the PVI-only group (155 ± 32 and 22 ± 8 minutes) were similar to those in the PVI/CTI-cryo group (P = NS) but significantly shorter than in the PVI/CTI-mixed group (P < 0.001 for both). Clinical outcomes were similar in all groups. CONCLUSION: When CTI ablation is performed with RF energy after PVI by cryoballoon, it adds significantly to the procedure and fluoroscopy durations; when performed contemporaneously using cryotherapy at both sites, the procedure and fluoroscopy durations are not prolonged.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jce.12410

  7 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24597730
[Au] Autor:Letsas KP; Efremidis M; Vlachos K; Karlis D; Lioni L; Asvestas D; Valkanas K; Mihas CC; Sideris A
[Ad] Address:Second Department of Cardiology, Laboratory of Cardiac Electrophysiology, Evangelismos General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece.
[Ti] Title:The impact of catheter ablation in the interpulmonary isthmus on atrial fibrillation ablation outcomes: a randomized study.
[So] Source:J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol;25(7):709-13, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1540-8167
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have underscored the importance of the interpulmonary isthmus in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). The efficacy of additional radiofrequency energy delivery in the interpulmonary isthmus following pulmonary vein antral isolation (PVAI) was investigated. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 76 patients (49 males, mean age 56.8 ± 10.3) with drug-resistant paroxysmal (n = 64) and short-lasting persistent AF (n = 12) underwent PVAI. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive either "no further ablation" (group I, n = 38) or additional lesions in the interpulmonary isthmus of both ipsilateral pulmonary veins (group II, n = 38). There were no significant differences between study groups regarding the clinical and echocardiographic data. A trend towards a longer fluoroscopy time was observed in group II (P = 0.076). After a mean follow-up period of 11.1 ± 2.6 months, 22 patients in group I (57.9%) and 25 patients in group II (65.8%) were free from arrhythmia recurrence without any antiarrhythmic drug treatment after a single ablation procedure. The Kaplan-Meier arrhythmia-free survival curves showed no significant differences between study groups (P = 0.460). CONCLUSIONS: Additional lesions in the interpulmonary isthmus following PVAI do not have incremental value in preventing AF recurrence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jce.12399

  8 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23107007
[Au] Autor:Onesti MG; Fioramonti P; Fino P; Massera D; Amorosi V; Scuderi N
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, University of Rome "Sapienza", Policlinico Umberto I, Viale del Policlinico, Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Skin ulcer caused by venous extravasation of heroin.
[So] Source:Int Wound J;11(4):409-11, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1742-481X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The accidental leakage of the compound, in this case heroin, from the veins where it is injected, causes the formation of tissue lesions. Similar mechanisms lead to progressive tissue necrosis, which, if not immediately treated, results in the loss of the relevant function. A 57-year-old man presented a skin lesion on the posterior region of the left forearm with extensive necrosis of skin and subcutaneous layer involving the underlying muscle planes, caused by a venous extravasation of heroin that he reports having injected himself. The wound size is 15 × 10 cm; it had a sanious, fibrinous, secreting and smelly bottom. In this period, the patient was subjected to daily focused dressing before debridement of the lesion through a collagenase plus hyaluronic acid ointment: Bionect Start®; (FIDIA Pharmaceutical, Abano, Italy). The therapeutic choice was rewarded with a complete resolution of the wound through a non-invasive technique and over a short period. Avoiding the hospitalisation of the patient achieved a reduction of risks for him and of the costs for the National Health Service (NHS). The Bionect Start®; (FIDIA Pharmaceutical) as well as allowing the healing of the wound also decreased significantly the pain felt by the patient, the amount of exudate and the bad smell improving in a non-negligible way his quality of life.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/j.1742-481X.2012.01110.x

  9 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25045278
[Au] Autor:Santoro D; Benedetto F; Mondello P; Pipitò N; Barillà D; Spinelli F; Ricciardi CA; Cernaro V; Buemi M
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Unit of Nephrology, University of Messina, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Vascular access for hemodialysis: current perspectives.
[So] Source:Int J Nephrol Renovasc Dis;7:281-94, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1178-7058
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A well-functioning vascular access (VA) is a mainstay to perform an efficient hemodialysis (HD) procedure. There are three main types of access: native arteriovenous fistula (AVF), arteriovenous graft, and central venous catheter (CVC). AVF, described by Brescia and Cimino, remains the first choice for chronic HD. It is the best access for longevity and has the lowest association with morbidity and mortality, and for this reason AVF use is strongly recommended by guidelines from different countries. Once autogenous options have been exhausted, prosthetic fistulae become the second option of maintenance HD access alternatives. CVCs have become an important adjunct in maintaining patients on HD. The preferable locations for insertion are the internal jugular and femoral veins. The subclavian vein is considered the third choice because of the high risk of thrombosis. Complications associated with CVC insertion range from 5% to 19%. Since an increasing number of patients have implanted pacemakers and defibrillators, usually inserted via the subclavian vein and superior vena cava into the right heart, a careful assessment of risk and benefits should be taken. Infection is responsible for the removal of about 30%-60% of HD CVCs, and hospitalization rates are higher among patients with CVCs than among AVF ones. Proper VA maintenance requires integration of different professionals to create a VA team. This team should include a nephrologist, radiologist, vascular surgeon, infectious disease consultant, and members of the dialysis staff. They should provide their experience in order to give the best options to uremic patients and the best care for their VA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140721
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2147/IJNRD.S46643

  10 / 155868 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24452906
[Au] Autor:Wilson SM
[Ad] Address:Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Department of Neurology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.
[Ti] Title:The impact of vascular factors on language localization in the superior temporal sulcus.
[So] Source:Hum Brain Mapp;35(8):4049-63, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0193
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The left superior temporal sulcus (STS) has been shown in numerous functional imaging studies to be a critical region for language processing, as it is reliably activated when language comprehension is compared with acoustically matched control conditions. Studies in non-human primates have demonstrated several subdivisions in the STS, yet the precise region(s) within the STS that are important for language remain unclear, in large part because the presence of draining veins in the sulcus makes it difficult to determine whether neural activity is localized to the dorsal or ventral bank of the sulcus. We used functional MRI to localize language regions, and then acquired several additional sequences in order to account for the impact of vascular factors. A breath-holding task was used to induce hypercapnia in order to normalize voxel-wise differences in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responsivity, and veins were identified on susceptibility-weighted and T2*-weighted BOLD images, and masked out. We found that the precise locations of language areas in individual participants were strongly influenced by vascular factors, but that these vascular effects could be ameliorated by hypercapnic normalization and vein masking. After these corrections were applied, the majority of regions activated by language processing were localized to the dorsal bank of the STS. Hum Brain Mapp 35:4049-4063, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/hbm.22457


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