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[PMID]: 29524615
[Au] Autor:Chauhan V; Goyal K; Singh MP
[Ad] Address:Department of Virology, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, Punjab 160012, India.
[Ti] Title:Identification of broadly reactive epitopes targeting major glycoproteins of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2 - An immunoinformatics analysis.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Infections due to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 constitute an enormous health burden worldwide. Development of vaccine against herpes infections is a WHO supported public health priority. The viral glycoproteins have always been the major hotspots for vaccine designing. The present study was aimed to identify the conserved T and B cell epitopes in the major glycoproteins of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 via rigorous computational approaches. Identification of promiscuous T cell epitopes is of utmost importance in vaccine designing as such epitopes are capable of binding to several allelic forms of HLA and could generate effective immune response in the host. The criteria designed for identification of T and B cell epitopes was that it should be conserved in both HSV-1 and 2, promiscuous, have high affinity towards HLA alleles, should be located on the surface of glycoproteins and not be present in the glycosylation sites. This study led to the identification of 17 HLA Class II and 26 HLA Class I T cell epitopes, 9 linear and some conformational B cell epitopes. The identified T cell epitopes were further subjected to molecular docking analysis to analyze their binding patterns. Altogether we have identified 4 most promising regions in glycoproteins (2-gB, 1-gD, 1-gH) of HSV-1 and 2 which are promiscuous to HLA Class II alleles and have overlapping HLA Class I and B cell epitopes, which could be very useful in generating both arms of immune response in the host i.e. adaptive as well as humoral immunity. Further the authors propose the cross-validation of the identified epitopes in experimental settings for confirming their immunogenicity to support the present findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510663
[Au] Autor:Chatzis O; Darbre S; Pasquier J; Meylan P; Manuel O; Aubert JD; Beck-Popovic M; Masouridi-Levrat S; Ansari M; Kaiser L; Posfay-Barbe KM; Asner SA
[Ad] Address:Paediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Division of General Paediatrics, University Hospitals of Geneva & Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Burden of severe RSV disease among immunocompromised children and adults: a 10 year retrospective study.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;18(1):111, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is associated with significant mortality rates amongst hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, with less known about other immunocompromised patients. METHODS: Ten-year retrospective cohort study of immunocompromised patients presenting with RSV disease documented at University Hospitals of Lausanne and Geneva. Severe RSV-related outcomes referred to RSV documented respiratory conditions requiring hospital admission, presenting as lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) or pneumonia. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess clinical and laboratory correlates of severe RSV disease. RESULTS: From 239 RSV-positive immunocompromised in and out-patients 175 were adults and 64 children of whom 111 (47.8%) presented with LRTI, which resulted in a 38% (89/239) admission rate to hospital. While immunocompromised children were more likely to be admitted to hospital compared to adults (75% vs 62.9%, p = 0.090), inpatients admitted to the intensive care unit (17/19) or those who died (11/11) were mainly adults. From multivariable analyses, adults with solid tumors (OR 5.2; 95% CI: 1.4-20.9 P = 0.015) or those requiring chronic immunosuppressive treatments mainly for rheumatologic conditions (OR 4.1; 95% CI: 1.1-16.0; P = 0.034) were significantly more likely to be admitted to hospital compared to hematopoietic stem cell (HSCT) recipients. Bacterial co-infection was significantly and consistently associated with viral LRTI and pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: From our findings, RSV-related disease results in a significant burden among adults requiring chronic immunosuppressive treatments for rheumatological conditions and those with solid tumors. As such, systematic screening for respiratory viruses, should be extended to other immunocompromised populations than HSCT recipients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-018-3002-3

  3 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506571
[Au] Autor:Haider N; Cuellar AC; Kjær LJ; Sørensen JH; Bødker R
[Ad] Address:National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. najha@vet.dtu.dk.
[Ti] Title:Microclimatic temperatures at Danish cattle farms, 2000-2016: quantifying the temporal and spatial variation in the transmission potential of Schmallenberg virus.
[So] Source:Parasit Vectors;11(1):128, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1756-3305
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Microclimatic temperatures provide better estimates of vector-borne disease transmission parameters than standard meteorological temperatures, as the microclimate represent the actual temperatures to which the vectors are exposed. The objectives of this study were to quantify farm-level geographic variations and temporal patterns in the extrinsic incubation period (EIP) of Schmallenberg virus transmitted by Culicoides in Denmark through generation of microclimatic temperatures surrounding all Danish cattle farms. METHODS: We calculated the hourly microclimatic temperatures at potential vector-resting sites within a 500 m radius of 22,004 Danish cattle farms for the months April to November from 2000 to 2016. We then modeled the daily EIP of Schmallenberg virus at each farm, assuming vectors choose resting sites either randomly or based on temperatures (warmest or coolest available) every hour. The results of the model output are presented as 17-year averages. RESULTS: The difference between the warmest and coolest microhabitats at the same farm was on average 3.7 °C (5th and 95th percentiles: 1.0 °C to 7.8 °C). The mean EIP of Schmallenberg virus (5th and 95th percentiles) for all cattle farms during spring, summer, and autumn was: 23 (18-33), 14 (12-18) and 51 (48-55) days, respectively, assuming Culicoides select resting sites randomly. These estimated EIP values were considerably shorter than those estimated using standard meteorological temperatures obtained from a numerical weather prediction model for the same periods: 43 (39-52), 21 (17-24) and 57 (55-58) days, respectively. When assuming that vectors actively select the coolest resting sites at a farm, the EIP was 2.3 (range: 1.1 to 4.1) times longer compared to that of the warmest sites at the same farm. CONCLUSIONS: We estimated a wide range of EIP in different microclimatic habitats surrounding Danish cattle farms, stressing the importance of identifying the specific resting sites of vectors when modeling vector-borne disease transmission. We found a large variation in the EIP among different farms, suggesting disease transmission may vary substantially between regions, even within a small country. Our findings could be useful for designing risk-based surveillance, and in the control and prevention of emerging and re-emerging vector-borne diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13071-018-2709-8

  4 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501636
[Au] Autor:Suhail M; Sohrab SS; Qureshi A; Tarique M; Abdel-Hafiz H; Al-Ghamdi K; Qadri I
[Ad] Address:King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, PO Box 80216, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Association of HCV mutated proteins and host SNPs in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:160-172, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hepatitis C virus plays a significant role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) globally. The pathogenic mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinoma with HCV infection are generally linked with inflammation, cytokines, fibrosis, cellular signaling pathways, and liver cell proliferation modulating pathways. HCV encoded proteins (Core, NS3, NS4, NS5A) interact with a broad range of hepatocytes derived factors to modulate an array of activities such as cell signaling, DNA repair, transcription and translational regulation, cell propagation, apoptosis, membrane topology. These four viral proteins are also implicated to show a strong conversion potential in tissue culture. Furthermore, Core and NS5A also trigger the accretion of the ß-catenin pathway as a common target to contribute viral induced transformation. There is a strong association between HCV variants within Core, NS4, and NS5A and host single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the HCC pathogenesis. Identification of such viral mutants and host SNPs is very critical to determine the risk of HCC and response to antiviral therapy. In this review, we highlight the association of key variants, mutated proteins, and host SNPs in development of HCV induced HCC. How such viral mutants may modulate the interaction with cellular host machinery is also discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29477551
[Au] Autor:Deviatkin AA; Lukashev AN
[Ad] Address:Institute of Molecular Medicine, Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia; Chumakov Federal Scientific Center for Research and Development of Immune-and-Biological Preparations of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: andreideviatkin@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Recombination in the rabies virus and other lyssaviruses.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:97-102, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recombination is a common event in RNA viruses; however, in the rabies virus there have been only a few reports of isolated recombination events. Comprehensive analysis found traces of recent recombination events within Arctic, Arctic-like and Africa 1b rabies virus groups, as well as recombination between distinct lyssaviruses. Recombination breakpoints were not linked to gene boundaries and could be detected all over the genome. However, there was no evidence that recombination is an important factor in the genetic variability of the rabies virus. It is therefore likely that recombination in the rabies virus is limited by ecological factors (e.g., rare co-circulation of distinguishable lineages and a narrow window for productive coinfection in most carnivore hosts), rather than molecular barriers (e.g., incompatibility of genome fragments).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29477550
[Au] Autor:Cai M; Huang J; Bu D; Yu Z; Fu X; Ji C; Zhou P; Zhang G
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China; Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Prevention and Control of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, China.
[Ti] Title:Molecular evolution of H1N1 swine influenza in Guangdong, China, 2016-2017.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:103-108, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Swine are the main host of the H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV), however, H1N1 can also infect humans and occasionally cause serious respiratory disease. To trace the evolution of the SIV in Guangdong, China, we performed an epidemic investigation during the period of 2016-2017. Nine H1N1 influenza viruses were isolated from swine nasal swabs. Antigenic analysis revealed that these viruses belonged to two distinct antigenic groups, represented by A/Swine/Guangdong/101/2016 and A/Swine/Guangdong/52/2017. Additionally, three genotypes, known as GD52/17-like, GD493/17-like and GD101/16-like, were identified by phylogenetic analysis. Importantly, the genotypes including a minimum of 4 pdm/09-origin internal genes have become prevalent in China in recent years. A total of 2966 swine serum samples were used to perform hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests, and the results showed that the seroprevalence values of SW/GD/101/16 (32.2% in 2016, 32.1% in 2017) were significantly higher than the seroprevalence values of SW/GD/52/17 (18.0% in 2016, 16.7% in 2017). Our study showed that the three reassortant genotypes of H1N1 SIV currently circulating in China are stable, but H1N1pdm09 poses challenges to human health by the introduction of internal genes into these reassortant genotypes. Strengthening SIV surveillance is therefore critical for SIV control and minimizing its potential threat to public health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29476812
[Au] Autor:de Melo AB; de Souza WM; Acrani GO; Carvalho VL; Romeiro MF; Tolardo AL; da Silva SP; Cardoso JF; de Oliveira Chiang J; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez JL; do Socorro da Silva Azevedo R; Figueiredo LTM; da Costa Vasconcelos PF; Nunes MRT; de Almeida Medeiros DB
[Ad] Address:Department of Arbovirology and Hemorrhagic Fevers, Evandro Chagas Institute, Ministry of Health, Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Genomic characterization and evolution of Tacaiuma orthobunyavirus (Peribunyaviridae family) isolated in Brazil.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:71-76, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tacaiuma virus (TCMV) is antigenically characterized as a member of the Anopheles A complex in the Orthobunyavirus genus, Peribunyaviridae family (Bunyavirales order). Clinically, the TCMV infection is characterized by acute febrile illness with myalgia and arthralgia lasting three to five days. However, the genomic and evolutionary aspect of this virus has not been elucidated. In this study, we described the complete coding sequences of three segments of two TCMV strains isolated in Brazil and three complete coding sequences of the small segment of three TCMV strains. All the strains sequenced in this study showed the typical genomic organization of orthobunyaviruses that infect vertebrates, except for the absence of the open reading frame that encodes the well-described non-structural small protein. This study presents the genomic and evolutionary characterization of TCMV strains and would be helpful for diagnostic purposes and epidemiology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471118
[Au] Autor:Boonchan M; Guntapong R; Sripirom N; Ruchusatsawat K; Singchai P; Rungnobhakhun P; Tacharoenmuang R; Mizushima H; Tatsumi M; Takeda N; Sangkitporn S; Mekmullica J; Motomura K
[Ad] Address:Thailand-Japan Research Collaboration Center on Emerging and Re-emerging Infections (RCC-ERI), Nonthaburi 11000, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:The dynamics of norovirus genotypes and genetic analysis of a novel recombinant GII.P12-GII.3 among infants and children in Bangkok, Thailand between 2014 and 2016.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:133-139, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Norovirus (NoV) is the leading cause of viral acute gastroenteritis among all age groups in the world. We performed a molecular epidemiological study of the NoVs prevalent in Bangkok between November 2014 and July 2016 to investigate the emergence of new NoV variants in Thailand. A total of 332 stool specimens were collected from hospitalized pediatric patients with acute gastroenteritis in Bangkok, Thailand. NoVs were detected by real-time PCR. The genome of the N-terminal/shell domain was amplified, the nucleotide sequence was determined, and phylogenetic analyses were performed. GII NoV was detected in 58 (17.5%) of the 332 specimens. GII.17, a genotype strain prevalent from 2014 to mid-2015, was hardly detected and replaced by the GII.3 genotype strain. Entire genome sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis of the GII.3 genotype strains indicated that they are new recombinant viruses, because the genome encoding ORF1 is derived from a GII.12 genotype strain, whereas that encoding ORF2-3 is from a GII.3 genotype strain. The putative recombination breakpoints with the highest statistical significance were located around the border of 3D and ORF2. The change in the prevalent strain of NoV seems to be linked to the emergence of new forms of recombinant viruses. These findings suggested that the swapping of the structural and non-structural proteins of NoV is a common mechanism by which new epidemic variants are generated in nature.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471085
[Au] Autor:Zhu H; Lu X; Ling L; Li H; Ou Y; Shi X; Lu Y; Zhang Y; Chen D
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiological and Biochemical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Houttuynia cordata polysaccharides ameliorate pneumonia severity and intestinal injury in mice with influenza virus infection.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;218:90-99, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Hottuynia cordata is an important traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of respiratory diseases including bacterial and viral infections. Polysaccharides isolated from Houttuynia cordata (HCP), as its main ingredients, have been demonstrated to ameliorate the LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. The study aimed to determine the protective effects of HCP on multiple organ injury in influenza A virus (IAV) H1N1 infected mice and its primary mechanisms in anti-inflammation and immune regulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mice were inoculated with IAV H1N1 and then treated with 20 or 40 mg/kg/d of HCP for survival test and acute lung-gut injury test. RESULTS: The treatment with HCP resulted in an increase in the survival rate of H1N1 infected mice and the protection from lung and intestine injury, accompanied with the reduced virus replication. HCP markedly decreased the concentration of pulmonary proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and the number of intestinal goblet cells, and strengthened the intestinal physical and immune barrier, according to the increase of sIgA and tight junction protein (ZO-1) in intestine. At the same time, the inhibition of inflammation in lung and gut was related to the suppressing of the expression of TLR4 and p-NFκB p65 in lung. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that HCP ameliorated lung and intestine injury induced by IAV attack. The mechanisms were associated with inhibition of inflammation, protection of intestinal barrier and regulation of mucosal immunity, which may be related to the regulation of gut-lung axis. As an alternative medicine, HCP may have clinical potential to treat IAV infection in human beings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 295016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29454113
[Au] Autor:Moens MAJ; Pérez-Tris J; Cortey M; Benítez L
[Ad] Address:Department of Biodiversity, Ecology and Evolution, Faculty of Biology, Complutense University of Madrid. Calle José Antonio Nováis 12, 28040 Madrid, Spain; Jocotoco Foundation, Lizardo García E9-104 y Andrés Xaura, Quito, Ecuador. Electronic address: m.moens@bio.ucm.es.
[Ti] Title:Identification of two novel CRESS DNA viruses associated with an Avipoxvirus lesion of a blue-and-gray Tanager (Thraupis episcopus).
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:89-96, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The discovery of circular rep-encoding single stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses has increased spectacularly over the past decade. They represent the smallest animal viruses known worldwide infecting a wide variety of invertebrates and vertebrates in different natural and human-made environments. The extremely low similarity of nucleotide and protein sequences among different CRESS DNA genomes has challenged their classification. Moreover, the existence of capsid proteins (Cp) remains difficult to demonstrate which is crucial to understand the structural properties of these viruses. Here we describe two unclassified CRESS DNA viruses isolated from a cutaneous lesion, caused by a strain of Avipoxvirus, from a blue-and-gray tanager (Thraupis episcopus) in Southern Ecuador. Both viruses present replication-associated proteins (Rep) and one to two open reading frames (ORF), one of which represents a putative Cp. The two new Rep are long proteins characterized by the existence of the several highly conserved amino acid residues characteristic of rolling circle replication. Within the putative Cp we detected intrinsically disordered regions (IDR), potential protein and DNA binding regions, and nuclear localization signals (NLS), providing further evidence of presumed Cp. Despite being found on the same host lesion, both viruses show low similarity between each other (<60%) and other known CRESS DNA viruses. Furthermore, we analyze the evolutionary relationships within the CRESS DNA diversity. Additional sampling is needed to explore the possible pathogenic effects, prevalence and diversity (both phylogenetical and structural) of these viruses in wild bird populations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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