Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29506498
[Au] Autor:Zhang Y; Chen YG
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Huayuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China.
[Ti] Title:High incidence of rainbow glare after femtosecond laser assisted-LASIK using the upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;18(1):71, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To compare the incidence of rainbow glare (RG) after femtosecond laser assisted-LASIK (FS-LASIK) using the upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser with different flap cut parameter settings. METHODS: A consecutive series of 129 patients (255 eyes) who underwent FS-LASIK for correcting myopia and/or astigmatism using upgraded WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser with the original settings was included in group A. Another consecutive series of 129 patients (255 eyes) who underwent FS-LASIK using upgraded WaveLight FS200 femtosecond laser with flap cut parameter settings changed (decreased pulse energy, spot and line separation) was included in group B. The incidence and fading time of RG, confocal microscopic image and postoperative clinical results were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: There were no differences between the two groups in age, baseline refraction, excimer laser ablation depth, postoperative uncorrected visual acuity and refraction. The incidence rate of RG in group A (35/255, 13.73%) was significantly higher than that in group B (4/255, 1.57%) (P < 0.05). The median fading time was 3 months in group A and 1 month in group B (P > 0.05).The confocal microscopic images showed wider laser spot spacing in group A than group B. The incidence of RG was significantly correlated with age and grouping (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The upgraded FS200 femtosecond laser with original flap cut parameter settings could increase the incidence of RG. The narrower grating size and lower pulse energy could ameliorate this side effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Astigmatism/surgery
Glare
Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ/methods
Lasers, Excimer/adverse effects
Myopia/surgery
Vision Disorders/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Humans
Incidence
Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ/instrumentation
Microscopy, Confocal
Refraction, Ocular/physiology
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Flaps
Tomography, Optical Coherence
Vision Disorders/physiopathology
Visual Acuity/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180307
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-018-0734-1

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[PMID]: 29522609
[Au] Autor:Allegri RF; Bagnatti P
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Neurología Cognitiva, Neuropsicología y Neuropsiquiatría del Instituto de Investigaciones Neurológicas "Raúl Carrea" (FLENI), Buenos Aires, Argentina. Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de la Costa (CUC), Barranquilla, Colombia. rallegri@?eni.org.ar.
[Ti] Title:Historia de la neuropsicología a las neurociencias cognitivas en Argentina. [History from neuropsychology to cognitive neurosciences in Argentina].
[So] Source:Vertex;XXVIII(136):468-478, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0327-6139
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:The first step from the neuropsychology in Argentina was in 1883 with the thesis of Antonio Piñeiro about the brain localization of the language and vision disorders, only few years after Broca. The aim of this work has been to describe the development of the neuropsychology in Argentina and its relation with the psychology, neurology and psychiatry. The first period was into the neurology with its French school in?uence. In 1907, Jose Ingeniero published in French his book about "amusia", Cristofredo Jakob the "folia neurobiologica" where he described the organization of the human brain, Vicente Dimitri in 1933 his book "aphasia" and Bernardo de Quiros in 1959 his works about dyslexia. The psychiatry at the hospices with the German influence from Jakob developed to the modern neuropsychiatry with Juan Carlos Goldar. The argentine school of psychology by the holism and the psychoanalysis influence do not accept the neuropsychology until 1960 where was included at the school of psychology from the university of Buenos Aires (UBA) with the first linguistics works of Juan Azcoaga. At the 80, began the North American influence of the neurology with authors like Carlos Mangone (dementia), Ramon Leiguarda (apraxia), Sergio Starkstein (depression and apathy) and Ricardo Allegri (memory and Alzheimer). In 1982 the Argentine Neuropsychological Society was founded and in 1987 was the working group of dementia from the Argentine Neurological Society. At this moment, Aldo Ferreres organized the chair of neuropsychology at the school of psychology (UBA). Nowadays, the growing as discipline is in context of the psychology, neurology and psychiatry in the way of the recent cognitive neurosciences.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29522583
[Au] Autor:Garber-Epstein P; Roe D
[Ad] Address:The Bob Shapell School of Social Work, Tel Aviv University, Israel. paulagarbere@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:El modelo de recuperación: un paradigma, dos concepciones. [The recovery model: One paradigm, two conceptions].
[So] Source:Vertex;XXVIII(135):360-366, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0327-6139
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:In recent decades, new models of recovery have been developed in the feld of mental health, based on the transfer of hospital treatment to the community. Community mental health became the standard of care and treatment, and people with mental illness were able to freely congregate and support each other. The new recovery model includes broad aspects of the person and recovery became the "guiding vision" of mental health services. New defnitions of recovery were developed that focus on the difference between recovering from an illness and being in recovering, or in other words, "clinical recovery" versus "personal recovery." This important development represents a huge challenge for policy makers and planners of modern mental health systems. As is clear from this article, efforts to implement a recovery-oriented perspective that will produce a more consumerbased mental health system have just begun. The urgent need to investigate these efforts, taking into account the complexity and many meanings of "recovery", begins to manifest itself in mental health research agendas. Recovery-oriented treatments focus on preparing and training the person with mental disorders to acquire the knowledge necessary to manage their own disease and recovery process, and thus improve overall functioning, health and quality of life.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29505511
[Au] Autor:Grzybowski A; Elikowski W; Gaca-Wysocka M
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Poznan City Hospital, Poznan.
[Ti] Title:Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with combined central retinal vein occlusion and cilioretinal artery occlusion: Case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9255, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: To analyze cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidity of acute unilateral visual loss due to combined central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO). PATIENT CONCERNS: Among patients with retinal vein or artery occlusion hospitalized at the Department of Ophthalmology between January 2011 and August 2017, subjects with combined CRVO/CLRAO were selected. All of them underwent ophthalmologic and cardiologic examination, including fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, 12-lead electrocardiogram, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, carotid Doppler sonography, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and a panel of laboratory tests. DIAGNOSES: Four subjects with coexisting CRVO and CLRAO were found among 146 patients with retinal vein or artery occlusion. There were no other types of concomitance of CRVO and retinal artery occlusion. INTERVENTIONS: All patients were treated with low molecular heparin in a full dose for 2 weeks, then with 1 mg/kg once daily for the next 2 weeks, followed by acetylsalicylic acid 75 mg/kg/d. Other medication included long-term statins, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor in 3 patients and beta-blocker in one patient. OUTCOMES: All patients with CRVO/CLRAO presented multiple cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia, chronic nicotine addiction, and a positive family history of coronary artery disease or stroke. In all of them, echocardiography revealed left ventricular hypertrophy and atherosclerotic lesions in the descending aorta; in addition, 3 patients had insignificant atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery. Also, in 3 subjects, focal ischemic cerebral changes were diagnosed. LESSONS: Patients with combined CRVO and CLRAO present numerous cardiovascular risk factors and abnormalities on imaging examinations, which should be routinely evaluated and treated.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Retinal Artery Occlusion/complications
Retinal Vein Occlusion/complications
Vision Disorders/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged, 80 and over
Carotid Arteries/diagnostic imaging
Child, Preschool
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Neuroimaging
Retinal Artery Occlusion/diagnostic imaging
Retinal Vein Occlusion/diagnostic imaging
Risk Factors
Vision Disorders/diagnostic imaging
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009255

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[PMID]: 29499674
[Au] Autor:Casas P; Ascaso FJ; Vicente E; Tejero-Garcés G; Adiego MI; Cristóbal JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Clínico Universitario "Lozano Blesa", San Juan Bosco 15, ES-50009, Zaragoza, Spain. paulacasaspascual@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Visual field defects and retinal nerve fiber imaging in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and in healthy controls.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;18(1):66, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To assess the retinal sensitivity in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients evaluated with standard automated perimetry (SAP). And to correlate the functional SAP results with structural parameters obtained with optical coherence tomography (OCT). METHODS: This prospective, observational, case-control study consisted of 63 eyes of 63 OSAHS patients (mean age 51.7 ± 12.7 years, best corrected visual acuity ≥20/25, refractive error less than three spherical or two cylindrical diopters, and intraocular pressure < 21 mmHg) who were enrolled and compared with 38 eyes of 38 age-matched controls. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness was measured by Stratus OCT and SAP sensitivities and indices were explored with Humphrey Field Analyzer perimeter. Correlations between functional and structural parameters were calculated, as well as the relationship between ophthalmologic and systemic indices in OSAHS patients. RESULTS: OSAHS patients showed a significant reduction of the sensitivity for superior visual field division (p = 0.034, t-student test). When dividing the OSAHS group in accordance with the severity of the disease, nasal peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly lower in severe OSAHS than that in controls and mild-moderate cases (p = 0.031 and p = 0.016 respectively, Mann-Whitney U test). There were no differences between groups for SAP parameters. We found no correlation between structural and functional variables. The central visual field sensitivity of the SAP revealed a poor Pearson correlation with the apnea-hipopnea index (0.284, p = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS: Retinal sensitivity show minor differences between healthy subjects and OSAHS. Functional deterioration in OSAHS patients is not easy to demonstrate with visual field examination.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Nerve Fibers/pathology
Optic Nerve Diseases/etiology
Retinal Ganglion Cells/pathology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/complications
Vision Disorders/etiology
Visual Fields
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Case-Control Studies
Female
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Optic Nerve Diseases/diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/diagnosis
Tomography, Optical Coherence
Vision Disorders/diagnosis
Visual Field Tests
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180304
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-018-0728-z

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[PMID]: 29447172
[Au] Autor:Alemayehu AM; Belete GT; Adimassu NF
[Ad] Address:Department of Optometry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Knowledge, attitude and associated factors among primary school teachers regarding refractive error in school children in Gondar city, Northwest Ethiopia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191199, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Refractive error is an important cause of correctable visual impairment in the worldwide with a global distribution of 1.75% to 20.7% among schoolchildren. Teacher's knowledge about refractive error play an important role in encouraging students to seek treatment that helps in reducing the burden of visual impairment. OBJECTIVE: To determine knowledge, attitude and associated factors among primary school teachers regarding refractive error in school children in Gondar city. METHODS: Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted on 565 primary school teachers in Gondar city using pretested and structured self-administered questionnaire. For processing and analysis, SPSS version 20 was used and variables which had a P value of <0.05 in the multivariable analysis were considered as statistically significant. RESULT: A total of 565 study subjects were participated in this study with a mean age of 42.05 ± 12.01 years. Of these study participants 55.9% (95% CI: 51.9, 59.8) had good knowledge and 57.2% (95% CI: 52.9, 61.4) had favorable attitude towards refractive error. History of spectacle use [AOR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.32, 3.43)], history of eye examination [AOR = 1.67 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.34)], training on eye health [AOR = 1.94 (95% CI; 1.09, 3.43)] and 11-20 years of experience [AOR = 2.53 (95% CI: 1.18, 5.43)] were positively associated with knowledge. Whereas being male [AOR = 2.03 (95% CI: 1.37, 3.01)], older age [AOR = 3.05 (95% CI: 1.07, 8.72)], 31-40 years of experience [AOR = 0.23 (95% CI: 0.07, 0.72)], private school type [AOR = 1.76 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.93)] and 5th -8th teaching category [AOR = 1.54 (95% CI: 1.05, 2.24)] were associated with attitude. CONCLUSION: Knowledge and attitude of study subjects were low which needs training of teachers about the refractive error.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Teacher Training/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethiopia
Eyeglasses
Female
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Middle Aged
Refractive Errors/diagnosis
Refractive Errors/etiology
Refractive Errors/prevention & control
Risk Factors
School Teachers
Schools
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Teacher Training/classification
Vision, Low
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191199

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[PMID]: 29521022
[Au] Autor:Jiang N; Montelongo Y; Butt H; Yetisen AK
[Ad] Address:School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.
[Ti] Title:Microfluidic Contact Lenses.
[So] Source:Small;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1613-6829
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Contact lens is a ubiquitous technology used for vision correction and cosmetics. Sensing in contact lenses has emerged as a potential platform for minimally invasive point-of-care diagnostics. Here, a microlithography method is developed to fabricate microconcavities and microchannels in a hydrogel-based contact lens via a combination of laser patterning and embedded templating. Optical microlithography parameters influencing the formation of microconcavities including ablation power (4.3 W) and beam speed (50 mm s ) are optimized to control the microconcavity depth (100 µm) and diameter (1.5 mm). The fiber templating method allows the production of microchannels having a diameter range of 100-150 µm. Leak-proof microchannel and microconcavity connections in contact lenses are validated through flow testing of artificial tear containing fluorescent microbeads (Ø = 1-2 µm). The microconcavities of contact lenses are functionalized with multiplexed fluorophores (2 µL) to demonstrate optical excitation and emission capability within the visible spectrum. The fabricated microfluidic contact lenses may have applications in ophthalmic monitoring of metabolic disorders at point-of-care settings and controlled drug release for therapeutics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/smll.201704363

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[PMID]: 29518882
[Au] Autor:Xiong C; Zhang X
[Ad] Address:Affiliated Eye Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Research Institute of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Jiangxi Provincial Key Laboratory for Ophthalmology, Nanchang 330006, China.
[Ti] Title:[Progress of clinical correlation research on migraine and glaucoma].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yan Ke Za Zhi;54(3):224-228, 2018 Mar 11.
[Is] ISSN:0412-4081
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:Migraine is a common primary headache disorder. The estimated annual prevalence rate of migraine in China is 9.3%. Migraine is typically involved with a series of ocular symptoms including glaucoma, visual performance tests relevant to glaucoma exhibited correlation between glaucoma and migraine. Even though migraine patients exhibit no glaucoma-related signs during intermissions of migraine attacks, the results of visual function tests (visual field, electrophysiology, ocular imaging) relevant to glaucoma still indicate abnormalities. It is fairly typical that most of the patients may neglect their ocular problems when migraine breaks out. Epidemiological data suggests an increasing prevalence of migraine patients with glaucoma, particularly normal tension glaucoma. This paper reviews and discusses the effect of migraine on the clinical assessment and diagnosis of glaucoma. .
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0412-4081.2018.03.015

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[PMID]: 29466819
[Au] Autor:Daniels J; Haber N; Voss C; Schwartz J; Tamura S; Fazel A; Kline A; Washington P; Phillips J; Winograd T; Feinstein C; Wall DP
[Ad] Address:Division of Systems Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University, California, United States.
[Ti] Title:Feasibility Testing of a Wearable Behavioral Aid for Social Learning in Children with Autism.
[So] Source:Appl Clin Inform;9(1):129-140, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1869-0327
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent advances in computer vision and wearable technology have created an opportunity to introduce mobile therapy systems for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) that can respond to the increasing demand for therapeutic interventions; however, feasibility questions must be answered first. OBJECTIVE: We studied the feasibility of a prototype therapeutic tool for children with ASD using Google Glass, examining whether children with ASD would wear such a device, if providing the emotion classification will improve emotion recognition, and how emotion recognition differs between ASD participants and neurotypical controls (NC). METHODS: We ran a controlled laboratory experiment with 43 children: 23 with ASD and 20 NC. Children identified static facial images on a computer screen with one of 7 emotions in 3 successive batches: the first with no information about emotion provided to the child, the second with the correct classification from the Glass labeling the emotion, and the third again without emotion information. We then trained a logistic regression classifier on the emotion confusion matrices generated by the two information-free batches to predict ASD versus NC. RESULTS: All 43 children were comfortable wearing the Glass. ASD and NC participants who completed the computer task with Glass providing audible emotion labeling ( = 33) showed increased accuracies in emotion labeling, and the logistic regression classifier achieved an accuracy of 72.7%. Further analysis suggests that the ability to recognize surprise, fear, and neutrality may distinguish ASD cases from NC. CONCLUSION: This feasibility study supports the utility of a wearable device for social affective learning in ASD children and demonstrates subtle differences in how ASD and NC children perform on an emotion recognition task.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0038-1626727

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[PMID]: 29441972
[Au] Autor:Sakurada H; Yasuhara K; Kato K; Asano S; Yoshida M; Yamamura M; Tachi T; Teramachi H
[Ti] Title:An investigation of visual hallucinations associated with voriconazole administration to patients with hematological malignancies.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(11):660-664, 2016 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Voriconazole (VRCZ) is commonly administered to treat fungal infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Some of these patients experience VRCZ-associated visual hallucinations. We conducted a retrospective survey to investigate the characteristic features of this side effect. Patients with hematological malignancies who were treated with VRCZ for a fungal infection after hospitalization at Ichinomiya municipal hospital between 1 October 2005 and 31 December 2015 were included in this study (n = 103). Fifteen of these (14.6%) reported visual hallucinations that started on day 1-7. Seven of these 15 patients developed this symptom rapidly (day 1 or 2). Three patients had transient symptoms (lasting 2-12 days), 6 patients experienced hallucinations throughout the treatment, and the duration was unknown in 6 patients. Eleven patients experienced visual hallucinations when their eyes were closed (73 %) and these disappeared when they opened their eyes. One patient had visual hallucinations with open eyes, while the state of the eyes was unknown in 3 patients. The patients saw a range of images including people, animals, landscapes, and foods; several reported seeing images like those found in movies. In addition, 9 of 15 patients (60%) with visual hallucinations had visual disturbances. This was a higher proportion than that observed in patients who did not develop hallucinations (17 of 88; 19.3 %; P < 0.05). However, we found no significant difference between the blood VCRZ concentrations of patients who developed or did not develop visual hallucinations. This study indicated that most of these patients had visual hallucinations that manifested on eye closure, and they did not progress to serious mental illness. Our findings emphasized the importance of fully explaining the features of this symptom to each patient prior to starting VRCZ administration in order to reduce anxiety. In addition, since VRCZ discontinuation will compromise patient management, therapeutic drug monitoring should be used to increase the likelihood of successful therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/adverse effects
Hallucinations/chemically induced
Hematologic Neoplasms/complications
Hematologic Neoplasms/psychology
Voriconazole/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antifungal Agents/blood
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use
Female
Hallucinations/epidemiology
Hallucinations/psychology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoses/complications
Mycoses/prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Vision Disorders/chemically induced
Vision Disorders/epidemiology
Voriconazole/blood
Voriconazole/therapeutic use
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antifungal Agents); JFU09I87TR (Voriconazole)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6725


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