Database : MEDLINE
Search on : Vitamin and A and Deficiency [Words]
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[PMID]: 29514147
[Au] Autor:Stone CA; McEvoy CT; Aschner JL; Kirk A; Rosas-Salazar C; Cook-Mills JM; Moore PE; Walsh WF; Hartert TV
[Ad] Address:Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
[Ti] Title:Update on Vitamin E and Its Potential Role in Preventing or Treating Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.
[So] Source:Neonatology;113(4):366-378, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1661-7819
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vitamin E is obtained only through the diet and has a number of important biological activities, including functioning as an antioxidant. Evidence that free radicals may contribute to pathological processes such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a disease of prematurity associated with increased lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress, led to trials of the antioxidant vitamin E (α-tocopherol) to prevent BPD with variable results. These trials were all conducted at supraphysiologic doses and 2 of these trials utilized a formulation containing a potentially harmful excipient. Since 1991, when the last of these trials was conducted, both neonatal management strategies for minimizing oxygen and ventilator-related lung injury and our understanding of vitamin E isoforms in respiratory health have advanced substantially. It is now known that there are differences between the effects of vitamin E isoforms α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol on the development of respiratory morbidity and inflammation. What is not known is whether improvements in physiologic concentrations of individual or combinations of vitamin E isoforms during pregnancy or following preterm birth might prevent or reduce BPD development. The answers to these questions require adequately powered studies targeting pregnant women at risk of preterm birth or their premature infants immediately following birth, especially in certain subgroups that are at increased risk of vitamin E deficiency (e.g., smokers). The objective of this review is to compile, update, and interpret what is known about vitamin E isoforms and BPD since these first studies were conducted, and suggest future research directions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1159/000487388

  2 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523679
[Au] Autor:Lau WL; Obi Y; Kalantar-Zadeh K
[Ad] Address:Harold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, University of California, Irvine, California.
[Ti] Title:Parathyroidectomy in the Management of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism.
[So] Source:Clin J Am Soc Nephrol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1555-905X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops in CKD due to a combination of vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia, and it exists in nearly all patients at the time of dialysis initiation. There is insufficient data on whether to prefer vitamin D analogs compared with calcimimetics, but the available evidence suggests advantages with combination therapy. Calcium derangements, patient adherence, side effects, and cost limit the use of these agents. When parathyroid hormone level persists >800 pg/ml for >6 months, despite exhaustive medical interventions, monoclonal proliferation with nodular hyperplasia is likely present along with decreased expression of vitamin D and calcium-sensing receptors. Hence, surgical parathyroidectomy should be considered, especially if concomitant disorders exist, such as persistent hypercalcemia or hyperphosphatemia, tissue or vascular calcification including calciphylaxis, and/or worsening osteodystrophy. Parathyroidectomy is associated with 15%-57% greater survival in patients on dialysis, and it also improves hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, tissue calcification, bone mineral density, and health-related quality of life. The parathyroidectomy rate in the United States declined to approximately seven per 1000 dialysis patient-years between 2002 and 2011 despite an increase in average parathyroid hormone levels, reflecting calcimimetics introduction and uncertainty regarding optimal parathyroid hormone targets. Hospitalization rates are 39% higher in the first postoperative year. Hungry bone syndrome occurs in approximately 25% of patients on dialysis, and profound hypocalcemia requires high doses of oral and intravenous calcium along with calcitriol supplementation. Total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation carries a higher risk of permanent hypocalcemia, whereas risk of hyperparathyroidism recurrence is higher with subtotal parathyroidectomy. Given favorable long-term outcomes from observational parathyroidectomy cohorts, despite surgical risk and postoperative challenges, it is reasonable to consider parathyroidectomy in more patients with medically refractory secondary hyperparathyroidism.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522772
[Au] Autor:Wardzinski EK; Kistenmacher A; Melchert UH; Jauch-Chara K; Oltmanns KM
[Ad] Address:Section of Psychoneurobiology, Center of Brain, Behavior and Metabolism, University of Luebeck, Germany. Electronic address: Wardzinski@pnb.uni-luebeck.de.
[Ti] Title:Impaired brain energy gain upon a glucose load in obesity.
[So] Source:Metabolism;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8600
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is evidence that the brain's energy status is lowered in obesity despite of chronic hypercaloric nutrition. The underlying mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that the brain of obese people does not appropriately generate energy in response to a hypercaloric supply. METHODS: Glucose was intravenously infused in 17 normal weights and 13 obese participants until blood glucose concentrations reached the postprandial levels of 7 mmol/L and 10 mmol/L. Changes in cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress hormonal measures regulating glucose homeostasis were monitored. Because vitamin C is crucial for a proper neuronal energy synthesis we determined circulating concentrations during the experimental testing. RESULTS: Cerebral high-energy phosphates were increased at blood glucose levels of 7 mmol/L in normal weights, which was completely missing in the obese. Brain energy content moderately raised only at blood glucose levels of 10 mmol/L in obese participants. Vitamin C concentrations generally correlated with the brain energy content at blood glucose concentrations of 7 mmol/L. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate an inefficient cerebral energy gain upon a glucose load in obese men, which may result from a dysfunctional glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier or a downregulated energy synthesis in mitochondrial oxidation processes. Our finding offers an explanation for the chronic neuroenergetic deficiency and respectively missing satiety perception in obesity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505508
[Au] Autor:Li W; Cheng X; Guo L; Li H; Sun C; Cui X; Zhang Q; Song G
[Ad] Address:Department of ICU, Affiliated Children's Hospital of Capital Institute of Pediatrics.
[Ti] Title:Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and pulmonary infection in children.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9060, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We assessed the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) level and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among Chinese children.This observational study examined children aged 3 days to 14 years (n = 1582) from the Capital Institute of Pediatrics in 2009 to 2011. There were 797 children in the CAP group and 785 controls. The CAP group was divided into 2 groups: a pneumonia group and pneumonia-induced sepsis group. The serum 25(OH)D level was estimated using micro whole blood chemiluminescence.The average serum 25(OH)D level in all samples was 25.32  14.07 ng/mL, with the CAP group showing a lower value than the control group (P < .001). There were also significant differences between the pneumonia group and pneumonia-induced sepsis group (P < .001). In the pneumonia-induced sepsis group, significant differences in serum 25(OH)D levels were observed in children who received mechanical ventilation or presenting with multiple organ dysfunction (P < .01).All serum 25(OH)D levels in the pneumonia group and pneumonia-induced sepsis group were below normal levels, particularly in the sepsis group. A lower serum 25(OH)D level was associated with more serious symptoms in CAP children. Children with low serum 25(OH)D levels may be at higher risk of receiving mechanical ventilation and presenting with multiple organ dysfunction. These findings suggest that vitamin D supplements are beneficial for the treatment and prevention of CAP.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pneumonia/blood
Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Acquired Infections/blood
Community-Acquired Infections/etiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nutritional Status
Pneumonia/etiology
ROC Curve
Seasons
Sepsis/blood
Sepsis/etiology
Vitamin D/blood
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:1406-16-2 (Vitamin D); 64719-49-9 (25-hydroxyvitamin D)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009060

  5 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29470176
[Au] Autor:Marwaha RK; Garg MK; Gupta S; Ganie MA; Gupta N; Narang A; Shukla M; Arora P; Singh A; Chadha A; Mithal A
[Ad] Address:Senior Consultant Endocrinology and Scientific Advisor (Projects), ILSI-India, Flat No. 17, Gautam Apartments, Gautam Nagar, New Delhi 110049, India.
[Ti] Title:Association of insulin-like growth factor-1 and IGF binding protein-3 with 25-hydroxy vitamin D in pre-pubertal and adolescent Indian girls.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab;31(3):289-295, 2018 Mar 28.
[Is] ISSN:2191-0251
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (VDD) in India. Molecular mechanisms suggest a strong relationship between vitamin D and growth factors. However, there is a paucity of literature with regard to a relationship between insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and vitamin D particularly in subjects with VDD. The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between growth factors and serum vitamin D-parathormone (PTH) status in school girls and study the impact of vitamin D supplementation on growth factors in pre-pubertal girls with VDD. METHODS: Our study subjects were apparently healthy school girls aged 6-18 years. The baseline height, weight, body mass index (BMI), pubertal status, serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD), PTH, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were assessed in 847 girls aged 6-18 years and in 190 pre-pubertal girls with VDD following supplementation. RESULTS: The mean age, BMI and serum 25OHD of girls were 11.53.2 years, 18.74.8 kg/m2 and 9.95.6 ng/mL, respectively. VDD was observed in 94.6% of girls. Unadjusted serum IGF-1 levels and IGF-1/IGFBP-3 molar ratio were significantly higher in girls with severe VDD as compared to girls with mild-to-moderate VDD. However, these differences disappeared when adjusted for age, height or sexual maturation. The serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels increased significantly post supplementation with vitamin D. CONCLUSIONS: There were no differences in serum IGF-1 levels and the IGF-1/IGFBP-3 molar ratio among VDD categories when adjusted for age, height and sexual maturation in girls. Vitamin D supplementation resulted in a significant increase in serum IGF-1 levels in VDD pre-pubertal girls.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29439677
[Au] Autor:Brebring L; Bullarbo M; Glantz A; Hulthn L; Ellis J; Jagner ; Schoenmakers I; Winkvist A; Augustin H
[Ad] Address:The Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 459, 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. linnea.barebring@gu.se.
[Ti] Title:Trajectory of vitamin D status during pregnancy in relation to neonatal birth size and fetal survival: a prospective cohort study.
[So] Source:BMC Pregnancy Childbirth;18(1):51, 2018 02 13.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2393
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We investigated the associations between vitamin D status in early and late pregnancy with neonatal small for gestational age (SGA), low birth weight (LBW) and preterm delivery. Furthermore, associations between vitamin D status and pregnancy loss were studied. METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) was sampled in gestational week ≤ 16 (trimester 1 (T1), N = 2046) and > 31 (trimester 3 (T3), N = 1816) and analysed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Pregnant women were recruited at antenatal clinics in south-west Sweden at latitude 57-58N. Gestational and neonatal data were retrieved from medical records. Multiple gestations and terminated pregnancies were excluded from the analyses. SGA was defined as weight and/or length at birth < 2 SD of the population mean and LBW as < 2500g. Preterm delivery was defined as delivery < 37 + 0 gestational weeks and pregnancy loss as spontaneous abortion or intrauterine fetal death. Associations between neonatal outcomes and 25OHD at T1, T3 and change in 25OHD (T3-T1) were studied using logistic regression. RESULTS: T1 25OHD was negatively associated with pregnancy loss and 1nmol/L increase in 25OHD was associated with 1% lower odds of pregnancy loss (OR 0.99, p = 0.046). T3 25OHD ≥ 100nmol/L (equal to 40ng/ml) was associated with lower odds of SGA (OR 0.3, p = 0.031) and LBW (OR 0.2, p = 0.046), compared to vitamin D deficiency (25OHD < 30nmol/L, or 12ng/ml). Women with a ≥ 30nmol/L increment in 25OHD from T1 to T3 had the lowest odds of SGA, LBW and preterm delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency in late pregnancy was associated with higher odds of SGA and LBW. Lower 25OHD in early pregnancy was only associated with pregnancy loss. Vitamin D status trajectory from early to late pregnancy was inversely associated with SGA, LBW and preterm delivery with the lowest odds among women with the highest increment in 25OHD. Thus, both higher vitamin D status in late pregnancy and gestational vitamin D status trajectory can be suspected to play a role in healthy pregnancy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12884-018-1683-7

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[PMID]: 29397388
[Au] Autor:Antonucci R; Locci C; Clemente MG; Chicconi E; Antonucci L
[Ad] Address:Pediatric Clinic, Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin D deficiency in childhood: old lessons and current challenges.
[So] Source:J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab;31(3):247-260, 2018 Mar 28.
[Is] ISSN:2191-0251
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypovitaminosis D in childhood is a re-emerging public health problem in developed countries. New life style habits, current "epidemics" of obesity in children and adolescents worldwide, and other preventable risk factors may play a role in favoring the occurrence of vitamin D deficiency. In addition to skeletal consequences, hypovitaminosis D has been found to be involved in the development of serious health extra-skeletal problems in childhood, including atopy and autoimmunity. The increasing concerns about the global health impact of vitamin D deficiency make further research necessary to fill the gaps of knowledge in this field, and particularly to establish universally accepted "normal" serum 25(OH)D levels in the pediatric population, and to improve strategies for the screening, prevention and treatment of hypovitaminosis D. This review discusses the key points of hypovitaminosis D in childhood in the light of new knowledge, and highlights the limitations of current strategies to control this condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377934
[Au] Autor:Soudy ID; Minet-Quinard R; Mahamat AD; Ngoua HF; Izzedine AA; Tidjani A; Ngo Bum E; Lambert C; Pereira B; Desjeux JF; Sapin V
[Ad] Address:Institut National Suprieur des Sciences et Techniques d'Abch (INSTA-Tchad), Abch, Tchad.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin A status in healthy women eating traditionally prepared spirulina (Dih) in the Chad Lake area.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191887, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chad Lake is a central place in a region with a high prevalence of vitamin A deficiency. Spirulina, a natural source of -carotene, is traditionally produced and eaten as "Dih" around Chad Lake. -carotene spirulina has been found to have a high conversion factor to retinol. The aim of the study was to assess if the retinol status between healthy women eating spirulina Dih daily (SPI+) and not (SPI-) in the Chad Lake area was different. METHODS: This study was observational: 88 healthy women were recruited and selected according to clinical criteria and their willingness to participate. They were divided in two groups according to their Dih daily consumption: those who eat Dih (SPI+; n = 35) and those who do not (SPI-; n = 35). After anthropometric and dietary assessments, blood retinol, -carotene, retinol binding, and inflammatory/nutritional proteins were measured. RESULTS: The diet between groups was identical, except for -carotene consumption, which was higher in SPI+ than in SPI- (10.8 vs. 1.8 mg/day). The serum retinol and -carotene concentrations were significantly higher in SPI+ than in SPI- at 1.26 0.36 mol/l versus 1.03 0.31 mol/l (p = 0.008) and 0.59 0.37 mol/l versus 0.46 0.31 mol/l (p = 0.04), respectively. Seventy-seven percent of SPI+ versus 29% of SPI- had an adequate blood retinol value (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: The results confirm that -carotene in spirulina is an effective positive modulator of blood retinol status. Dih is a potential natural source of -carotene to achieve a proper vitamin A status in healthy women living near Chad Lake.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Spirulina
Vitamin A/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Chad
Diet
Female
Humans
Lakes
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:11103-57-4 (Vitamin A)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191887

  9 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29247550
[Au] Autor:Jeelani R; Maitra D; Chatzicharalampous C; Najeemuddin S; Morris RT; Abu-Soud HM
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, C. S. Mott Center for Human Growth and Development, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.
[Ti] Title:Melatonin prevents hypochlorous acid-mediated cyanocobalamin destruction and cyanogen chloride generation.
[So] Source:J Pineal Res;64(3), 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1600-079X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent cytotoxic oxidant generated by the enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H O ) and chloride (Cl ). Elevated levels of HOCl play an important role in various pathological conditions through oxidative modification of several biomolecules. Recently, we have highlighted the ability of HOCl to mediate the destruction of the metal-ion derivatives of tetrapyrrole macrocyclic rings such as hemoproteins and vitamin B (VB ) derivatives. Destruction of cyanocobalamin, a common pharmacological form of VB mediated by HOCl, results in the generation of toxic molecular products such as chlorinated derivatives, corrin ring cleavage products, the toxic blood agents cyanide (CN ) and cyanogen chloride (CNCl), and redox-active free cobalt. Here, we show that melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated cyanocobalamin destruction, using a combination of UV-Vis spectrophotometry, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, and colorimetric CNCl assay. Identification of several melatonin oxidation products suggests that the protective role of melatonin against HOCl-mediated cyanocobalamin destruction and subsequent CNCl generation is at the expense of melatonin oxidation. Collectively, this work highlights that, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and as a MPO inhibitor, melatonin can also prevent VB deficiency in inflammatory conditions such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, among many others.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jpi.12463

  10 / 50198 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520716
[Au] Autor:Ashton A; Stoney PN; Ransom J; McCaffery P
[Ad] Address:Institute of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences and Nutrition, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, Scotland, AB25 2ZD, UK.
[Ti] Title:Rhythmic DiurnalSynthesis and Signaling of Retinoic Acid in the Rat Pineal Gland and Its Action to Rapidly Downregulate ERK Phosphorylation.
[So] Source:Mol Neurobiol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1559-1182
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vitamin A is important for the circadian timing system; deficiency disrupts daily rhythms in activity and clock gene expression, and reduces the nocturnal peak in melatonin in the pineal gland. However, it is currently unknown how these effects are mediated. Vitamin A primarily acts via the active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), a transcriptional regulator with emerging non-genomic activities. We investigated whether RA is subject to diurnal variation in synthesis and signaling in the rat pineal gland. Its involvement in two key molecular rhythms in this gland was also examined: kinase activation and induction of Aanat, which encodes the rhythm-generating melatonin synthetic enzyme. We found diurnal changes in expression of several genes required for RA signaling, including a RA receptor and synthetic enzymes. The RA-responsive gene Cyp26a1 was found to change between day and night, suggesting diurnal changes in RA activity. This corresponded to changes in RA synthesis, suggesting rhythmic production of RA. Long-term RA treatment in vitro upregulated Aanat transcription, while short-term treatment had no effect. RA was also found to rapidly downregulate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting a rapid non-genomic action which may be involved in driving the molecular rhythm in ERK1/2 activation in this gland. These results demonstrate that there are diurnal changes in RA synthesis and activity in the rat pineal gland which are partially under circadian control. These may be key to the effects of vitamin A on circadian rhythms, therefore providing insight into the molecular link between this nutrient and the circadian system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12035-018-0964-5


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