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[PMID]: 29524810
[Au] Autor:Yuan S; Yu HJ; Liu MW; Huang Y; Yang XH; Tang BW; Song Y; Cao ZK; Wu HJ; He QQ; Gasevic D
[Ad] Address:School of Health Sciences, Wuhan University, PR China.
[Ti] Title:The association of fruit and vegetable consumption with changes in weight and body mass index in Chinese adults: a cohort study.
[So] Source:Public Health;157:121-126, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5616
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Findings regarding the benefits of fruit and vegetables (FV) on weight control are inconsistent and little is known among Chinese populations. Therefore, we examined the relationship between change in FV consumption, weight, and change in body mass index (BMI) among Chinese adults, participants of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS). STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. METHODS: Two waves of CHNS conducted in 2006 and 2011 were used. Continuous FV consumption increase was considered as the exposure and changes in weight and BMI as outcomes. Change in FV consumption was categorized into quintiles. Analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression models, after controlling for potential confounders such as energy intake, physical activity, and smoking, were used to describe the relationship between change in FV consumption and change in weight and BMI. RESULTS: A total of 4357 participants aged 18-65 years were included in this study. The respective weight and BMI gains in male individuals were 1.81 kg and 0.73 kg/m in the fifth quintile of FV change relative to individuals in the first quintile (3.67 kg for weight gain and 1.48 kg/m for BMI gain). An increase in FV consumption by 100 g was associated with a 211 g weight loss (B = -2.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], -3.34, -0.89, P < 0.001) and a decrease in BMI by 0.94 kg/m (B = -0.94; 95% CI, -1.36, -0.46, P < 0.001) in men; and a 140 g weight loss (B = -0.14; 95% CI, -0.97, 0.69, P = 0.74) and a decrease in BMI by 0.29 kg/m BMI (B = -0.29; 95% CI, -0.63, 0.06, P = 0.11) in women. CONCLUSIONS: Increase in FV consumption was associated with statistically significant weight loss and decrease in BMI among Chinese men, and, although suggested, weight loss among women was not significant. Considering the protective effect of FV on human health, increasing FV consumption in the Chinese population is recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515750
[Au] Autor:Aradoini N; Talbi S; Azzouzi H; Abourazzak FZ; Khibri H; Berrady R; Bono W; Harzy T
[Ad] Address:Faculté de Médecine, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdallah, Service de Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hassan II, Fès, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Spondylarthrite ankylosante et maladie de Still: un lien physiopathologique ou une simple association? [Ankylosing spondylitis associated with Still's disease: should it be considered a pathophysiologic link or a simple association?]
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:132, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatism; it is part of the group of spondyloarthrites. General signs such as fever and weight loss are of little importance. Adult Still's disease is a rare systemic condition, a diagnosis of exclusion commonly characterized by high hectic fever, rash, arthritis and various systemic manifestations. Few cases of ankylosing spondylitis associated with adult Still's disease have been described in the literature. We here report the case of a 31-year old patient followed up for ankylosing spondylitis presenting with fever which had lasted for a long time and clinico-biological signs compatible with adult Still's disease. A possible pathophysiologic link between the two diseases may be suggested, even if their simultaneous occurrence has been rarely reported in the literature.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.132.5607

  3 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515739
[Au] Autor:Agyemang-Yeboah F; Yorke J; Obirikorang C; Batu EN; Acheampong E; Frempong EA; Anto EO; Amankwaa B
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medical Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana.
[Ti] Title:Patterns and presentations of colorectal cancer at Komfo-Anokye teaching hospital Kumasi, Ghana.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:121, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Colorectal cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally and its incidence is increasing in developing countries. This study determined the incidence, clinical features and the histopathological patterns of colorectal cancer at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi, Ghana. Methods: A retrospective review of all colorectal cancer cases over a six year period from (2009-2015) presented to the Surgical and Oncological Department of KATH. Patients' records were retrieved and information on their demographics, clinical and pathological presentations recorded. Results: In all, 221 cases of colorectal cancer were identified over the study period. The mean age was 54 ± 16.8 and ranged from 16 to 90 years. Sixteen (7.24%) had family history of cancer and the prevalence of comorbidities was (24.89%). The commonest clinical symptoms presented were weight loss (44.80%), bleeding per rectum (39.82%) and abdominal pain (38.91%) Majority of the patients presented with rectal cancers (48.87%). Microscopically, adenocarcinoma (68.33%) was the most common histopathological type. According to Tumour Node Metastasis (TNM) staging of cancer, majority of the patients 89(40.27%) were identified as being in late stage (TNM Stage III). The overall crude annual incidence was 4.62 per 100000 populations. The age specific standardized incidence rate was 7.93 per 100,000 population. Conclusion: This study has clearly showed a high incidence in colorectal cancer at KATH, with similar trends in clinico-pathological patterns comparable to that of most African countries. These include predominance of rectal cancers, high incidence among younger people and delayed presentation of the disease at advanced stage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.121.12927

  4 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506574
[Au] Autor:Dalugama C; Gawarammana IB
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. chamaradalugama@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Fever with pancytopenia: unusual presentation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):58, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is a major health problem in the developing world. Diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis is delayed because the presentation is nonspecific. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis can present with various hematological manifestations, including pancytopenia. Pancytopenia could be due to hypersplenism, maturation arrest, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, or infiltration of the bone marrow by caseating or noncaseating granulomas causing reversible or irreversible fibrosis. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of a 56-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese man who presented with pyrexia of known origin with significant loss of weight and loss of appetite. He had mild pallor with mild hepatosplenomegaly. He had high inflammatory markers with pancytopenia in a peripheral blood smear. His chest radiograph was unremarkable, and he had a negative Mantoux test result. A diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis was made on the basis of caseating tuberculous granulomas in the bone marrow. CONCLUSIONS: Disseminated tuberculosis remains a diagnostic challenge because the presentation is vague and nonspecific. In case of pyrexia of unknown origin with peripheral cytopenia, the possibility of disseminated tuberculosis should be considered, particularly in endemic areas. Simultaneous culture and histopathological examination of the bone marrow is important in such instances, because results of common tests such as chest radiography or Mantoux tests can be negative.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1596-0

  5 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501798
[Au] Autor:Guilbert L; Ortiz CJ; Espinosa O; Sepúlveda EM; Piña T; Joo P; Zerrweck C
[Ad] Address:The Obesity Clinic at Hospital General Tláhuac, Avenida la Turba # 655, Col. Villa Centroamericana y del Caribe, Delegación Tláhuac, México City, Zip 13250, Mexico. Electronic address: lizbethgv@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Metabolic syndrome 2 years after laparoscopic gastric bypass.
[So] Source:Int J Surg;52:264-268, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1743-9159
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The latest diabetes consensus identified obesity as key component of the metabolic syndrome. The role of bariatric surgery over such syndrome has been less explored with a lack of long term studies, and especially among Mexicans. METHODS: Retrospective study including patients with metabolic syndrome submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass at a single institution with complete data after 24 months. The objective was to analyze the improvement of the syndrome and each component. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters were analyzed at 12 and 24 months. Secondarily weight loss and other parameters were also analyzed. Finally, an analysis of syndrome improvement related to weight loss was performed. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients were included. The 2 most common components associated with obesity were reduced HDL and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes. There was a significant improvement of metabolic syndrome and its components, as well as for the rest of the analyzed data, from the first check point and throughout follow-up. Prevalence of such syndrome was 6.3% at 12 and 24 months. Hypertension and raised glucose or Type 2 diabetes were the components with the greatest and fastest improvement; HDL levels and obesity were the least improved. There was a direct relationship between percentage of excess weight loss or percentage of excess BMI loss, and syndrome's improvement. CONCLUSION: Patients with metabolic syndrome improved after gastric bypass, with results lasting after 2 years; other metabolic parameters important for cardiovascular risk were also positively affected. There was a relationship between the amount of weight loss and improvement of metabolic syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501741
[Au] Autor:Ko LK; Rillamas-Sun E; Bishop S; Cisneros O; Holte S; Thompson B
[Ad] Address:Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States; Department of Health Services, University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: lko@fredhutch.org.
[Ti] Title:Together We STRIDE: A quasi-experimental trial testing the effectiveness of a multi-level obesity intervention for Hispanic children in rural communities.
[So] Source:Contemp Clin Trials;67:81-86, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1559-2030
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hispanic children are disproportionally overweight and obese compared to their non-Hispanic white counterparts in the US. Community-wide, multi-level interventions have been successful to promote healthier nutrition, increased physical activity (PA), and weight loss. Using community-based participatory approach (CBPR) that engages community members in rural Hispanic communities is a promising way to promote behavior change, and ultimately weight loss among Hispanic children. OBJECTIVES: Led by a community-academic partnership, the Together We STRIDE (Strategizing Together Relevant Interventions for Diet and Exercise) aims to test the effectiveness of a community-wide, multi-level intervention to promote healthier diets, increased PA, and weight loss among Hispanic children. METHODS: The Together We STRIDE is a parallel quasi-experimental trial with a goal of recruiting 900 children aged 8-12 years nested within two communities (one intervention and one comparison). Children will be recruited from their respective elementary schools. Components of the 2-year multi-level intervention include comic books (individual-level), multi-generational nutrition and PA classes (family-level), teacher-led PA breaks and media literacy education (school-level), family nights, a farmer's market and a community PA event (known as ciclovia) at the community-level. Children from the comparison community will receive two newsletters. Height and weight measures will be collected from children in both communities at three time points (baseline, 6-months, and 18-months). SUMMARY: The Together We STRIDE study aims to promote healthier diet and increased PA to produce healthy weight among Hispanic children. The use of CBPR approach and the engagement of the community will springboard strategies for intervention' sustainability. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT02982759 Retrospectively registered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29496525
[Au] Autor:Mubaraki MA; Dkhil MA; Hafiz TA; Khalil MF; Al-Shaebi EM; Delic D; Elshaikh K; Al-Quraishy S
[Ad] Address:Clinical Laboratory Sciences Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Vitamin D receptor regulates intestinal inflammatory response in mice infected with blood stage malaria.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:299-303, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Malaria is a harmful disease affecting both tropical and subtropical countries and causing sometimes fatal complications. The effects of malaria-related complications on the intestine have been relatively neglected, and the reasons for the intestinal damage caused by malaria infection are not yet clear. The present study aims to evaluate the influence of intestinal vitamin D receptor on host-pathogen interactions during malaria induced in mice by Plasmodium chabaudi. To induce the infection, animals were infected with 10 P. chabaudi-parasitized erythrocytes. Mice were sacrificed on day 8 post-infection. The infected mice experienced a significant body weight loss and parasitaemia affecting about 46% of RBCs. Infection caused marked pathological changes in the intestinal tissue indicated by shortening of the intestine and villi. Moreover, the phagocytic activity of macrophages increased significantly (P < 0.01) in the infected villi compared to the non-infected ones. Infection by the parasite also induced marked upregulation of nuclear factor-kappa B, inducible nitric oxide synthase, Vitamin D Receptor, interleukin-1ß, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma-mRNA. It can be implied from this that vitamin D receptor has a role in regulating malarial infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471068
[Au] Autor:Andriessen C; Christensen P; Vestergaard Nielsen L; Ritz C; Astrup A; Meinert Larsen T; Martinez JA; Saris WHM; van Baak MA; Papadaki A; Kunesova M; Jebb S; Blundell J; Lawton C; Raben A
[Ad] Address:Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.andriessen@alumni.maastrichtuniversity.nl.
[Ti] Title:Weight loss decreases self-reported appetite and alters food preferences in overweight and obese adults: Observational data from the DiOGenes study.
[So] Source:Appetite;125:314-322, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:People with obesity often struggle to maintain their weight loss after a weight loss period. Furthermore, the effect of weight loss on appetite and food preferences remains unclear. Hence this study investigated the effect of weight loss on subjective appetite and food preferences in healthy, overweight and obese volunteers. A subgroup of adult participants (n = 123) from the Diet Obesity and Genes (DiOGenes) study (subgroup A) was recruited from across six European countries. Participants lost ≥8% of initial body weight during an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD). Subjective appetite and food preferences were measured before and after the LCD, in response to a standardized meal test, using visual analogue rating scales (VAS) and the Leeds Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ). After the LCD, participants reported increased fullness (p < 0.05), decreased desire to eat (p < 0.05) and decreased prospective consumption (p < 0.05) after consuming the test meal. An interaction effect (visit x time) was found for hunger ratings (p < 0.05). Area under the curve (AUC) for hunger, desire to eat and prospective consumption was decreased by 18.1%, 20.2% and 21.1% respectively whereas AUC for fullness increased by 13.9%. Preference for low-energy products measured by the Food Preference Checklist (FPC) decreased by 1.9% before the test meal and by 13.5% after the test meal (p < 0.05). High-carbohydrate and high-fat preference decreased by 11.4% and 16.2% before the test meal and by 17.4% and 22.7% after the meal (p < 0.05). No other effects were observed. These results suggest that LCD induced weight loss decreases the appetite perceptions of overweight volunteers whilst decreasing their preference for high-fat-, high-carbohydrate-, and low-energy products.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29454140
[Au] Autor:Gorczyca AM; Washburn RA; Ptomey L; Mayo MS; Sullivan DK; Gibson CA; Lee R; Stolte S; Donnelly JE
[Ad] Address:Cardiovascular Research Center, Division of Internal Medicine, The University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66160, USA. Electronic address: agorczyca@ku.edu.
[Ti] Title:Weight management in rural health clinics: The Midwest diet and exercise trial.
[So] Source:Contemp Clin Trials;67:37-46, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1559-2030
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Obesity prevalence is higher in rural compared to urban residents. Rural health clinics offer a potential venue for delivery of weight management. However, traditional programs require travel to attend on-site meetings which is impractical or inconvenient for rural residents. Clinic staff in most rural settings are unlikely to be trained to provide effective weight management. Remote delivery using group phone conferences (GP) or individual phone calls (IP), by staff associated with rural clinics eliminates the need for travel to attend on-site meetings. The effectiveness of these approaches will be the focus of this trial. Staff at five primary care clinics, serving primarily rural residents, will be trained to deliver GP and IP interventions and an enhanced usual care (EUC), (i.e., individual face-to-face meetings (~45 min) at clinic site, four times across 18 mos.). Two hundred overweight/obese adults (BMI ≥ 25.0-45.0 kg/m , age ≥ 21 yrs.) will be recruited through each clinic and randomized to GP (n = 80), IP (n = 80), or EUC (n = 40) to compare weight loss (0-6 mos.), weight maintenance (7-18 mos.), and weight change during a 6 mo. no contact follow-up (19-24 mos.) between intervention arms. The GP and IP interventions will be identical in lesson plan content, diet, and physical activity. The only difference between groups will be the delivery format (group vs. individual) and session duration (GP ~45 min/session; IP ~15 min/session). Primary (body weight) and secondary outcomes (waist circumference, energy/macronutrient intake, physical activity) will be assessed at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 mos. Cost and contingent valuation analyses will also be completed. NCT REGISTRATION: NCT02932748.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 138808 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29454015
[Au] Autor:Shillito JA; Lea J; Tierney S; Cleator J; Tai S; Wilding JPH
[Ad] Address:School of Health Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. Electronic address: james.shillito@nwbh.nhs.uk.
[Ti] Title:Why I eat at night: A qualitative exploration of the development, maintenance and consequences of Night Eating Syndrome.
[So] Source:Appetite;125:270-277, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Night Eating Syndrome (NES), as a diagnosis, presents as a combination of disordered eating, sleep and mood. Patients identified as having both NES and obesity demonstrate poorer outcomes in terms of weight loss compared to those with NES only. However, research focusing on psychological factors associated with NES remains relatively underdeveloped. This study aimed to explore the relationship between NES and the experience of emotion from the perspective of patients accessing a weight management service. Ten adults who met diagnostic criteria for moderate or full NES took part in a semi-structured interview. Data were analysed using a constructivist approach to grounded theory. A core concept to emerge from the analysis was termed 'emotional hunger'; reflecting an urge or need to satiate a set of underlying unmet emotional needs. It was underpinned by the following interrelated themes: (1) Cultivating a dependency on food; (2) Relying on food to regulate emotions; (3) Understanding the significance of night-time; (4) Acknowledging the consequences of night eating. This study provides an in-depth understanding of the relationship between NES and the experience of emotion from the perspective of patients attending a weight management service. Results have potential to inform future service development, particularly around the adoption of a more holistic approach to night eating behaviours.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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