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[PMID]: 29524317
[Au] Autor:Beyene TJ; Mourits MCM; Revie CW; Hogeveen H
[Ad] Address:Business Economics Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Determinants of health seeking behaviour following rabies exposure in Ethiopia.
[So] Source:Zoonoses Public Health;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2378
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of this study was to identify factors that determine medical treatment seeking behaviour following potential rabies exposure after being bitten by a suspected dog and the likelihood of compliance to receive sufficient doses of post-exposure prophylaxis after the visit to a health centre visit. A detailed survey based on case investigation was conducted on suspected rabid dog bite cases in three areas of Ethiopia. Two multivariable logistic regression models were created with a set of putative variables to explain treatment seeking and compliance outcomes. Based on the registered bite cases at each health centre and the set of unregistered bite cases derived by contact tracing, 655 bite victim cases were identified to have occurred between September 2013 and August 2014. Of these evaluated bite incidences, 465 cases were considered to have been caused by a potentially rabid dog. About 77% of these suspected rabid dog bite victims visited a health centre, while 57% received sufficient doses of PEP. The overall likelihood of seeking medical services following rabies exposure was higher for people bitten by dogs of unknown ownership, where the bite was severe, being bitten on the leg, spend of more than 100 USD per month and where the victim lived close to the nearest health centre, while the likelihood of receiving sufficient doses of PEP was sensitive to monthly spending and distance to health centre. However, the evaluated factors did only explain a part of the variation among the three districts. The district in which victims lived appeared to have a relevant influence on the likelihood of seeking medical treatment but did not improve the prediction on the likelihood of treatment compliance. Given the insights obtained from this study, improvements in the rural districts with regard to accessibility of post-exposure prophylaxis delivering health centres in shorter distance could improve health seeking behaviour. In addition, in rural districts, majority of exposed persons who seek medical treatment tend to comply with treatment regimen, indicating that the promotion of medical treatment through awareness creation campaigns could be beneficial.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/zph.12458

  2 / 16400 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29320818
[Au] Autor:Chai JY; Sohn WM; Na BK; Park JB; Jeoung HG; Hoang EH; Htoon TT; Tin HH
[Ad] Address:Korea Association of Health Promotion, Seoul 07653, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Zoonotic Trematode Metacercariae in Fish from Yangon, Myanmar and Their Adults Recovered from Experimental Animals.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(6):631-641, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A survey was performed to investigate the infection status of zoonotic trematode (ZT) metacercariae in fish from a local market in Yangon City, Myanmar. A total of 264 fish (12 species) were collected through 4 times from December 2013 to June 2015. All collected fish were transferred to our laboratory on ice and examined by the artificial digestion method. More than 7 species of ZT metacercariae, i.e., Haplorchis taichui, H. pumilio, H. yokogawai, Centrocestus spp., Stellantchasmus falcatus, Pygidiopsis cambodiensis, and Procerovum sp. were detected. Metacercariae of H. taichui were collected in 58 (42.3%) out of 137 fish (5 species), and their average density was 42.9 per fish infected. Metacercariae of H. pumilio were detected in 96 (49.0%) out of 196 fish (9 species), and their average density was 23.6 per fish infected. H. yokogawai metacercariae were found in 40 (50.0%) out of 80 fish (5 species), and Centrocestus spp. metacercariae in 91 (50.8%) out of 179 fish (8 species), and their densities were 306 and 25.8 per fish infected, respectively. Metacercariae of S. falcatus and P. cambodiensis were detected only in mullets, Chelon macrolepis. A total of 280 Procerovum sp. metacercariae were found in 6 out of 12 climbing perch, Anabas testudineus. Morphological characteristics of adult flukes recovered from experimental animals were described. It has been first confirmed that fish from Yangon, Myanmar are commonly infected with various species of ZT metacercariae.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fishes/parasitology
Metacercariae/isolation & purification
Trematoda/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cats
Cricetinae
Humans
Metacercariae/anatomy & histology
Myanmar/epidemiology
Trematoda/anatomy & histology
Trematode Infections/epidemiology
Trematode Infections/parasitology
Zoonoses
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.631

  3 / 16400 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28456662
[Au] Autor:Kinkar L; Laurimäe T; Sharbatkhori M; Mirhendi H; Kia EB; Ponce-Gordo F; Andresiuk V; Simsek S; Lavikainen A; Irshadullah M; Umhang G; Oudni-M'rad M; Acosta-Jamett G; Rehbein S; Saarma U
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Institute of Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Tartu, Vanemuise 46, 50410 Tartu, Estonia.
[Ti] Title:New mitogenome and nuclear evidence on the phylogeny and taxonomy of the highly zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;52:52-58, 2017 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cystic echinococcosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.), is a significant global public health concern. Echinococcus granulosus s. l. is currently divided into numerous genotypes (G1-G8 and G10) of which G1-G3 are the most frequently implicated genotypes in human infections. Although it has been suggested that G1-G3 could be regarded as a distinct species E. granulosus sensu stricto (s. s.), the evidence to support this is inconclusive. Most importantly, data from nuclear DNA that provide means to investigate the exchange of genetic material between G1-G3 is lacking as none of the published nuclear DNA studies have explicitly included G2 or G3. Moreover, the commonly used relatively short mtDNA sequences, including the complete cox1 gene, have not allowed unequivocal differentiation of genotypes G1-G3. Therefore, significantly longer mtDNA sequences are required to distinguish these genotypes with confidence. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetic relations and taxonomy of genotypes G1-G3 using sequences of nearly complete mitogenomes (11,443bp) and three nuclear loci (2984bp). A total of 23 G1-G3 samples were analysed, originating from 5 intermediate host species in 10 countries. The mtDNA data demonstrate that genotypes G1 and G3 are distinct mitochondrial genotypes (separated by 37 mutations), whereas G2 is not a separate genotype or even a monophyletic cluster, but belongs to G3. Nuclear data revealed no genetic separation of G1 and G3, suggesting that these genotypes form a single species due to ongoing gene flow. We conclude that: (a) in the taxonomic sense, genotypes G1 and G3 can be treated as a single species E. granulosus s. s.; (b) genotypes G1 and G3 should be regarded as distinct genotypes only in the context of mitochondrial data; (c) we recommend excluding G2 from the genotype list.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cell Nucleus/genetics
DNA, Helminth/genetics
Echinococcus granulosus/classification
Mitochondria/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Africa, Northern
Animals
Asia
Echinococcus granulosus/genetics
Echinococcus granulosus/isolation & purification
Echinococcus granulosus/metabolism
Europe
Genome, Mitochondrial
Genotype
Humans
Phylogeny
Phylogeography
South America
Zoonoses/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28456536
[Au] Autor:More Bayona JA; Karuppannan AK; Barreda DR
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2P5, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Contribution of leukocytes to the induction and resolution of the acute inflammatory response in chickens.
[So] Source:Dev Comp Immunol;74:167-177, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0089
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A successful immune response against invading pathogens relies on the efficient activation of host defense mechanisms and a timely return to immune homeostasis. Despite their importance, these mechanisms remain ill-defined in most animal groups. This study focuses on the acute inflammatory response of chickens, important both as an avian model with a unique position in evolution as well as an increasingly notable target of infectious zoonotic diseases. We took advantage of an in vivo self-resolving intra-abdominal challenge model to provide an integrative view of leukocyte responses during the induction and resolution phases of acute inflammation. Our results showed rapid leukocyte infiltration into the abdominal cavity post zymosan challenge (significant increase as early as 4 h), which was dominated by heterophils. Peak leukocyte infiltration and ROS production reached maximum levels at 12 h post challenge, which was significantly earlier than comparative studies in teleost fish and mice. Both heterophils and monocyte/macrophages contributed to ROS production. Local leukocyte infiltration was preceded by an increase in peripheral leukocytes and a drop in the number of bone marrow leukocytes. The proportion of apoptotic leukocytes increased following peak of acute inflammation, rising to significant levels within the abdominal cavity by 48 h, consistent with other indicators for the resolution of inflammation. Importantly, comparison of chicken phagocytic responses with those previously shown in agnathan, teleost and murine models suggested a progressive evolutionary shift towards an increased sensitivity to pro-inflammatory pathogen-derived particles and decreased sensitivity towards homeostatic stimuli. Thus, while significant conservation can be noted across the immune systems of endotherms, this study highlights additional unique features that govern the induction and resolution of acute inflammation in the avian system, which may be relevant to disease susceptibility and performance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bird Diseases/immunology
Chickens/immunology
Inflammation/immunology
Leukocytes/immunology
Peritoneum/physiology
Zoonoses/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Disease
Animals
Apoptosis
Biological Evolution
Cell Movement
Cell Proliferation
Fishes
Humans
Immunity, Innate
Mice
Phagocytosis
Physiology, Comparative
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
Zymosan/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); 9010-72-4 (Zymosan)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170501
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29519244
[Au] Autor:García Casallas JC; Villalobos Monsalve W; Arias Villate SC; Fino Solano IM
[Ad] Address:Internal Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Clínica Universidad de La Sabana, Chía, Colombia. julio.garcia@unisabana.edu.co.
[Ti] Title:Acute liver failure complication of brucellosis infection: a case report and review of the literature.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):62, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Brucellosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses worldwide. It can affect any organ system, particularly the gastrointestinal system, but there is no report of acute liver failure as a brucellosis complication. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of acute liver failure secondary to brucellosis infection. A 75-year-old Hispanic man presented to a University Hospital in Chía, Colombia, with a complaint of 15 days of fatigue, weakness, decreased appetite, epigastric abdominal pain, jaundice, and 10 kg weight loss. On examination in an emergency room, abdomen palpation was normal with hepatosplenomegaly and the results of a liver function test were elevated. The diagnosis of brucellosis was confirmed by epidemiological contact and positive Rose Bengal agglutination with negative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay immunoglobulin M for Brucella. He was then treated with doxycycline plus trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, with a favorable clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation of brucellosis can be very imprecise because it can affect any organ system; however, there is no report of acute liver failure as a brucellosis complication. This is the first reported case in the Colombian literature of acute liver failure due to brucellosis. We found this case to be of interest because it could be taken into account for diagnosis in future appearances and we described adequate treatment and actions to be taken at presentation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1576-4

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[PMID]: 29516663
[Au] Autor:Camp JV; Haider R; Porea D; Oslobanu LE; Forgách P; Nowotny N
[Ad] Address:Institute of Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:Serological surveillance for Tahyna virus (California encephalitis orthobunyavirus, Peribunyaviridae) neutralizing antibodies in wild ungulates in Austria, Hungary and Romania.
[So] Source:Zoonoses Public Health;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2378
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A serosurvey for Tahyna virus (TAHV), a mosquito-borne California encephalitis orthobunyavirus (Peribunyaviridae) endemic to Europe, was performed to estimate the activity of TAHV on a broad geographic scale. Sera from wild boar (Sus scrofa), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) were collected from Austria, Hungary and Romania. Samples were tested for neutralizing antibodies against TAHV using a virus microneutralization assay. The results demonstrate that TAHV transmission to mammals is widespread in Europe, particularly in the wild boar population where the mean rate of seroconversion is 15.2%.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/zph.12457

  7 / 16400 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512303
[Au] Autor:Puro V; Fusco FM; Castilletti C; Carletti F; Colavita F; Agrati C; Di Caro A; Capobianchi MR; Ippolito G
[Ad] Address:Epidemiology and Pre-clinical Research Department, National Institute for Infectious Diseases "L. Spallanzani", Rome, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Occupational transmission of an Orthopoxvirus infection during an outbreak in a colony of Macaca tonkeana in Lazio Region, Italy, 2015.
[So] Source:Zoonoses Public Health;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1863-2378
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Orthopoxviruses spill over from animal reservoirs to accidental hosts, sometimes causing human infections. We describe the surveillance and infection control measures undertaken during an outbreak due to an Orthopoxvirus occurred in January 2015 in a colony of Macaca tonkeana in the province of Rieti, Latio, Italy, which caused a human asymptomatic infection. According to the epidemiological investigation, the human transmission occurred after an unprotected exposure. The contacts among wild, captive and domestic animals and humans, together with decreased immunity against Orthopoxviruses in the community, may put animal handlers at risk of infection, especially after the cessation of smallpox vaccination. To reduce these threats, standard precautions including respiratory hygiene and transmission-based precautions should be carefully applied also in veterinary medicine.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/zph.12459

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[PMID]: 29231626
[Au] Autor:Hasle G
[Ti] Title:Nye patogener, nye utfordringer. New pathogens, new challenges.
[So] Source:Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen;137(23-24), 2017 12 12.
[Is] ISSN:0807-7096
[Cp] Country of publication:Norway
[La] Language:eng; nor
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Tick-Borne Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Humans
Zoonoses/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:EDITORIAL
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4045/tidsskr.17.0890

  9 / 16400 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29357839
[Au] Autor:Xie X; Hu J; Sun G; Ding B; Feng L
[Ad] Address:Eye Center, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, No. 88 Jiefang Road, Hangzhou, 310009, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Orbital sparganosis in an 8-year boy: a case report.
[So] Source:BMC Ophthalmol;18(1):13, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2415
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Sparganosis is one of the neglected but important food-borne parasitic zoonoses, with higher prevalence in Asian countries. The infection is commonly located in the subcutaneous tissue, brain, breast, and lung, but fewer reported infections involve the eye. Because the majority of patients with sparganosis are adults, it is likely to be missed in children. CASE PRESENTATION: An 8-year-old boy presented to our clinic complaining of a painless ocular mass in his right eye for 1 month. The boy had a history of eating frogs and frog poultice applications to his eyelids. The patient was checked for an elliptical mass near the medial wall of the right eye. Serodiagnosis testing was positive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During surgical operation on the patient, calcified parasite eggs and foreign body granulomatous reaction were found using histological examination. Due to early detection and surgery, the patient fully recovered with no damage to his eyesight. CONCLUSIONS: Although rare, ocular sparganosis should be suspected in a mass of the eye when there is a history of eating frogs and frog poultice applications on eyelids. Early surgical resection is important for a good prognosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Eye Infections, Parasitic/diagnosis
Orbit/diagnostic imaging
Orbital Diseases/diagnosis
Sparganosis/diagnosis
Sparganum/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biopsy
Child
Diagnosis, Differential
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Eye Infections, Parasitic/parasitology
Humans
Male
Orbit/parasitology
Orbital Diseases/parasitology
Sparganosis/parasitology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180124
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12886-018-0675-8

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[PMID]: 29216959
[Au] Autor:Taxitiemuer A; Tuerdi G; Zhang Y; Wushouer F; Tao XY; Talipu J; Yimamu T; Ma HL
[Ad] Address:Westen China Field Epidemiology Training Program, Beijing 100050, China; Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Urumqi 830002, Xinjiang, China.
[Ti] Title:An Investigation of the First Case of Human Rabies Caused by a Fox in China in May 2016.
[So] Source:Biomed Environ Sci;30(11):825-828, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0895-3988
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study assesses the causes and prevention measures of rabies through epidemiological investigation and analysis. A field epidemiological survey was conducted to investigate a case of rabies by fox bite. The onset of symptoms began 50 days after the bite. The patient did not receive standard treatment, rabies vaccination, or rabies immunoglobulin injection. The fox was killed on the spot. Saliva and pre-death blood samples were collected at different periods, and only blood RT-PCR tests yielded positive results. Wild fox bite is a major risk factor of rabies infection in Xinjiang Province, China.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Foxes
Rabies/epidemiology
Rabies/transmission
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Brain/virology
China/epidemiology
Fatal Outcome
Foxes/virology
Humans
Male
Zoonoses
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3967/bes2017.110


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