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[PMID]: 29524544
[Au] Autor:Alexeeva N; Tamberg Y; Shunatova N
[Ad] Address:Department of Invertebrate Zoology, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya nab. 7/9, St. Petersburg, 199034, Russian Federation. Electronic address: nina.alexeyeva.spb@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Postembryonic development of pycnogonids: A deeper look inside.
[So] Source:Arthropod Struct Dev;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5495
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sea spiders form a small, enigmatic group of recent chelicerates, with an unusual bodyplan, oligosegmented larvae and a postembryonic development that is punctuated by many moults. To date, only a few papers examined the anatomical and ultrastructural modifications of the larvae and various instars. Here we traced both internal and external events of the whole postembryonic development in Nymphon brevirostre HODGE 1863 using histology, SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy. During postembryonic development, larvae of this species undergo massive reorganization: spinning apparatus and chelar glands disappear; larval legs redifferentiate; three new segments and abdomen are formed with their corresponding internal organs and appendages; circulatory and reproductive systems develop anew and the digestive and the nervous systems change dramatically. The body cavity remains schizocoelic throughout development, and no traces of even transitory coeloms were found in any instar. In Nimphon brevirostre, just like in Artemia salina LINNAEUS 1758 the heart arises through differentiation of the already existing schizocoel, and thus the circulatory systems of arthropods and annelids are not homologous. We found that classical chelicerate tagmata, prosoma and opisthosoma, are inapplicable to adult pycnogonids, with the most striking difference being the fate and structure of the seventh appendage-bearing segment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29188298
[Au] Autor:Zaghloul MS; Christodouleas JP; Smith A; Abdallah A; William H; Khaled HM; Hwang WT; Baumann BC
[Ad] Address:National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Adjuvant Sandwich Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy vs Adjuvant Chemotherapy Alone for Locally Advanced Bladder Cancer After Radical Cystectomy: A Randomized Phase 2 Trial.
[So] Source:JAMA Surg;153(1):e174591, 2018 Jan 17.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6262
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Locoregional failure for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer (LABC) after radical cystectomy (RC) is common even with chemotherapy and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) can decrease locoregional failure but has not been studied in the chemotherapy era. Objective: To investigate if adjuvant sequential RT plus chemotherapy can improve locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) compared with adjuvant chemotherapy alone. Design, Setting, and Participants: A randomized phase 3 trial was opened to compare adjuvant RT vs sequential chemotherapy plus RT after RC for LABC, but a third arm was added later as a randomized phase 2 trial to compare chemotherapy plus RT vs adjuvant chemotherapy alone, an emerging standard. The intent-to-treat phase 2 trial reported herein enrolled patients from December 2002 to July 2008. Data were analyzed from August 3, 2015, to January 6, 2016. Routine follow-up and surveillance pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans every 6 months during the first 2 years were performed. The setting was an academic center. Patients with bladder cancer 70 years or younger having 1 or more risk factors (≥pT3b, grade 3, or positive nodes) with negative margins after radical cystectomy plus pelvic lymph node dissection were eligible. Patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2, no evidence of distant metastases on CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis or on chest imaging, and adequate renal, hepatic, and hematologic function. Ninety-one percent (109 of 120) had ≥ pT3 disease. Interventions: Chemotherapy plus RT included 2 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15) and cisplatin (70 mg/m2 intravenously on day 2) before and after RT to 4500 cGy in 150 cGy twice-daily fractions over 3 weeks using 3-dimensional conformal techniques. Chemotherapy alone included 4 cycles of gemcitabine and cisplatin. Main Outcome and Measure: Locoregional recurrence-free survival. Results: The chemotherapy plus RT arm accrued 75 patients, and the chemotherapy-alone arm accrued 45 patients, with a weighted randomization to speed accrual. Fifty-three percent (64 of 120) had urothelial carcinoma, and 46.7% (56 of 120) had squamous cell carcinoma or other. The arms were balanced except for age (median, 52 vs 55 years; P = .04) and tumor size (mean, 4.9 vs 5.8 cm; P < .01), both favoring chemotherapy plus RT. Two-year outcomes and overall adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for chemotherapy plus RT vs chemotherapy alone were 96% vs 69% (HR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.02-0.39; P < .01) for LRFS, 68% vs 56% (HR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.27-1.06; P = .07) for disease-free survival, and 71% vs 60% (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.33-1.11; P = .11) for overall survival (OS). Five patients (7%) had RT-associated late grade 3 gastrointestinal tract adverse effects in the chemotherapy plus RT arm. Conclusions and Relevance: Adjuvant chemotherapy plus RT was reasonably well tolerated and was associated with significant improvements in LRFS and marginal improvements in disease-free survival vs chemotherapy alone in LABC. The addition of adjuvant RT should be considered for LABC. This regimen warrants further study in phase 3 trials. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01734798.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamasurg.2017.4591

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[PMID]: 29524294
[Au] Autor:Iftimia I; Halvorsen PH
[Ad] Address:Radiation Oncology Department, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Development of clinically relevant QA procedures for the BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system.
[So] Source:J Appl Clin Med Phys;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1526-9914
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop Quality Assurance procedures for the BrainLab ExacTrac (ET) imaging system following the TG 142 recommendations for planar kV imaging systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A custom-designed 3D printed holder was used to position the Standard Imaging QCkV-1 phantom at isocenter, facing the ET X ray tubes. The linac's light field (collimator at 45°) was used to position the phantom holder. The ET images were exported to ARIA where geometric distortion was checked. The DICOM images were analyzed in the PIPSpro software. The following parameters were recorded (technique 80 kV/2mAs): spatial resolution (Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) F50/F40/F30), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and noise. A baseline was generated for future image analysis. Beam quality and exposure were measured using the Unfors R/F detector. Using a rod holder, the detector was placed at isocenter, facing each ET X-ray tube. The measurements were performed for all preset protocols ranging from cranial low (80 kV/6.3 mAs) to abdomen high (145 kV/25 mAs). The total exposure was converted to dose. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The image quality parameters were close for the two tubes. A common baseline was therefore generated. The average baseline values (both tubes, both images/tube) were 1.06/1.18/1.30, 1.32, and 67.3 for the MTF F50/F40/F30, noise, and CNR respectively. The procedure described here was used for another 24 sets. Using a positioning template and 3D printed phantom holder, experimental reproducibility has been acceptably high. The measured phantom dimensions were within 1 mm from the nominal values. The measured kV values were within 2% of the nominal values. The exposure values for the two tubes were comparable. The range of total measured dose was 0.099 mGy (cranial low) to 1.353 mGy (abdomen high). CONCLUSIONS: A reliable process has been implemented for QA of the ET imaging system by characterizing the system's performance at isocenter, consistent with clinical conventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/acm2.12301

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[PMID]: 29523612
[Au] Autor:Miliaras S; Ziogas IA; Mylonas KS; Papadopoulos VN
[Ad] Address:1st Department of Surgery, Papageorgiou University General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Thessaloniki, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Primary malignant melanoma of the ascending colon.
[So] Source:BMJ Case Rep;2018, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1757-790X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Malignant gastrointestinal melanoma is usually a metastatic lesion. We report the case of a 67-year-old female patient who presented with intermittent abdominal pain, fever, rigor and diarrhoea. CT scan of the abdomen revealed a large mass at the right iliac fossa with features concerning for intra-abdominal abscess. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the preoperative diagnosis of abscess, and a right hemicolectomy was performed. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen was indicative of malignant melanoma, and immunohistochemical examination showed positivity to S100 protein, Melan-A, HMB-45 and vimentin. A series of postoperative clinical, laboratory and imaging examinations revealed no suspicious lesions in the skin, eye, leptomeninges or other sites. Therefore, the diagnosis of primary colonic melanoma was confirmed. Only 36 additional cases of primary colonic melanoma have been reported to date. These rare neoplasms are challenging to diagnose and usually require a multidisciplinary treatment approach, including surgery, chemotherapy and possibly immunotherapy or radiotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29523189
[Au] Autor:Ralapanawa U; Jayalath T; Senadhira D
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. udayapralapanawa@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with non ST elevation myocardial infarction.
[So] Source:BMC Res Notes;11(1):167, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1756-0500
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition with varying severity and a range of local and systemic complications. Here we report a patient with acute necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with a true non ST elevation myocardial infarction. CASE PRESENTATION: A 58 year old lady was admitted to our unit with acute onset epigastric pain and vomiting for 4 h duration. Following admission she complained of retrosternal tightening type of a chest pain. She had elevated serum amylase and cardiac troponin. Electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed lateral ischaemia. Contrast computerized tomography abdomen revealed acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Nonspecific ECG changes can occur in patients with acute pancreatitis. But the diagnosis of true myocardial infarction in a context of acute pancreatitis using ECGs, 2D echocardiography, cardiac biomarkers and coronary angiograms can be challenging with the choice of revascularization therapy and safety of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulant therapy. Decision making regarding the management of such a patient is also critical.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13104-018-3274-0

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[PMID]: 29523181
[Au] Autor:Xu X; Lai L; Zhang X; Chen J; Chen J; Wang F; Zheng J; Chen M
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, No. 69 Yongding Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100039, China.
[Ti] Title:Autologous chyle fat grafting for the treatment of hypertrophic scars and scar-related conditions.
[So] Source:Stem Cell Res Ther;9(1):64, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1757-6512
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Scarring is the product of natural restoration, yet its treatment remains challenging. Both collagen and fibroblasts are abnormally abundant in scars, leading to scar hyperplasia or contracture. Several clinical studies have reported that wrinkles at the recipient site are reduced, pores are narrowed, pigmentation is decreased, and skin is softened after autologous fat transplantation. In this study, we investigated the ability of autologous chyle fat injection to normalize the fibroblasts and collagen of scar tissue in 80 adult patients with hypertrophic scars resulting from severe burns received more than 1 year previously. METHODS: The patients underwent autologous chyle fat injection, and scar samples were collected at different time points. Differences in the number of adipocytes before and after chylosis were assessed by cell culture, and changes in the structural organization of the scars were detected via histologic and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS: After preparation, the chyle fat contained few autologous adipocytes and large amounts of extracellular matrix. Following the injection of chyle fat, the thickness, color, and elasticity of hypertrophic scar tissue tended toward normalization, and patient satisfaction increased. The three adipose tissue donor sites used for the preparation of chyle fat were the abdomen, buttocks, and inner thigh, of which the inner thigh yielded the best therapeutic outcomes. The density and quantity of fibroblasts in the scars decreased following the injection of chyle fat, and the arrangement, quantity, and shape of type III collagen fibers tended toward normalization. After three treatments, the results of immunohistochemical staining showed that type III collagen was significantly less abundant than before treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Autologous chyle fat transplantation has a good therapeutic effect on hypertrophic scar tissue. The injection of chyle fat into hypertrophic scar tissue reduced the density and quantity of fibroblasts and prompted the arrangement, quantity, and shape of type III collagen to normalize.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13287-018-0782-8

  7 / 85679 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522402
[Au] Autor:Katzschmann RK; Araki B; Rus D
[Ti] Title:Safe Local Navigation for Visually Impaired Users With a Time-of-Flight and Haptic Feedback Device.
[So] Source:IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng;26(3):583-593, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1558-0210
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper presents ALVU (Array of Lidars and Vibrotactile Units), a contactless, intuitive, hands-free, and discreet wearable device that allows visually impaired users to detect low- and high-hanging obstacles, as well as physical boundaries in their immediate environment. The solution allows for safe local navigation in both confined and open spaces by enabling the user to distinguish free space from obstacles. The device presented is composed of two parts: a sensor belt and a haptic strap. The sensor belt is an array of time-of-flight distance sensors worn around the front of a user's waist, and the pulses of infrared light provide reliable and accurate measurements of the distances between the user and surrounding obstacles or surfaces. The haptic strap communicates the measured distances through an array of vibratory motors worn around the user's upper abdomen, providing haptic feedback. The linear vibration motors are combined with a point-loaded pretensioned applicator to transmit isolated vibrations to the user. We validated the device's capability in an extensive user study entailing 162 trials with 12 blind users. Users wearing the device successfully walked through hallways, avoided obstacles, and detected staircases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1109/TNSRE.2018.2800665

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[PMID]: 29522393
[Au] Autor:Chew M; Aronowitz P
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA. mtchew@ucdavis.edu.
[Ti] Title:Primary livedo reticularis of the abdomen.
[So] Source:Cleve Clin J Med;85(3):181-183, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1939-2869
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3949/ccjm.85a.17047

  9 / 85679 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505538
[Au] Autor:Zhu J; Li H; Ding L; Cheng H
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology.
[Ti] Title:Imaging appearance of renal epithelioid angiomyolipoma: A case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9563, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Epithelioid angiomyolipoma (EAML) is an extremely rare disease. It commonly occurs in middle-aged females and mainly involves the kidney. Histological and immunohistochemical examination play important roles in differentiating EAML from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and poor-fat angiomyolipoma (AML). PATIENT CONCERNS: Here, We report the imaging phenotype, as well as the pathological findings of a case of EAML in a 39-year-old female. DIAGNOSES: Preoperative noncontrast computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 6.0 × 5.2 × 7.0 cm soft tissue mass with necrosis, located in the left kidney. On contrast-enhanced CT images, aprogressive enhancement pattern was observed. CT angiography did not show any enlarged vessels or vascular malformation. Abdominal MRI showed a well-circumscribed solid mass with a heterogeneous signal on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images. Ultrasonography of the abdomen demonstrated a hypoechoic mass with abundant blood flow. This patient underwent radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis was EAML. INTERVENTIONS: This patient underwent operative resection of the tumor. The resection margins were negative for the neoplastic proliferation and no distant metastases were found. The patient did not receive advanced radiotherapy or chemotherapy. OUTCOMES: Four months after surgery, the follow-up CT scan did not reveal any local recurrence or distant metastases. LESSONS: This case adds to the experience with EAML by summarizing its imaging characteristics as well as reviewing the literature. Additionally, we described the state-of-the-art management of the management of this rare tumor.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Angiomyolipoma/diagnostic imaging
Kidney Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Angiomyolipoma/pathology
Female
Humans
Kidney/pathology
Kidney Neoplasms/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009563

  10 / 85679 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521798
[Au] Autor:Barmparas G; Patel DC; Linaval NT; Dhillon NK; Patel KA; Margulies DR; Ley EJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Division of Acute Care Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.
[Ti] Title:A Negative CT May Be Sufficient to Safely Discharge Patients with Abdominal Seatbelt Sign from The Emergency Department: A Case Series Analysis.
[So] Source:J Trauma Acute Care Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:2163-0763
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The presence of an abdominal seatbelt sign (ASBS) following a motor vehicle collision (MVC) is associated with a high risk for occult intraabdominal injury, prompting imaging studies and a prolonged period of clinical observation. The aim of this study was to determine how a negative computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen/pelvis (A/P) can serve in the safe disposition of these patients. Our hypothesis was that in the setting of a negative CT, the presence of occult intra-abdominal injuries requiring a delayed intervention is extremely unlikely. METHODS: The medical charts of patients admitted from 01/2014 to 12/2016 to a Level I Trauma Center following a MVC were reviewed for a documentation of an ASBS. Patients who did not have a CT A/P upon admission were excluded. The CT A/P of the remaining patients were then classified as negative if there were no findings of acute vascular, visceral or bony injury or positive if any of these findings was present. The sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of CT A/P for the presence of an intraabdominal injury were calculated. RESULTS: Over the 3-year study period, 1,108 patients were admitted after a MVC. Of those, 196 (17.7%) had an ASBS upon presentation and 183/196 (93.4%) underwent a CT A/P. A total of 114/183 (62.3%) had a negative CT A/P. These patients remained hospitalized for a median of 2 (1-35) days with none (0.0%) requiring a delayed laparotomy. The sensitivity of CT A/P in identifying patients requiring an exploratory laparotomy was 100.0%, specificity was 67.9%, NPV was 100.0%, and PPV was 21.7%. The negative likelihood ratio was 0.00. CONCLUSION: For patients with an ASBS following a MVC, a negative CT A/P may be sufficient for safe discharge from the emergency department without any need for additional clinical observation. TYPE OF STUDY: Prognostic, clinical LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000001872


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