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[PMID]: 29524915
[Au] Autor:Mills DM; Martin CP; Armas SM; Calvo-Marzal P; Kolpashchikov DM; Chumbimuni-Torres KY
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816, United States.
[Ti] Title:A universal and label-free impedimetric biosensing platform for discrimination of single nucleotide substitutions in long nucleic acid strands.
[So] Source:Biosens Bioelectron;109:35-42, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4235
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report a label-free universal biosensing platform for highly selective detection of long nucleic acid strands. The sensor consists of an electrode-immobilized universal stem-loop (USL) probe and two adaptor strands that form a 4J structure in the presence of a specific DNA/RNA analyte. The sensor was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using K [Fe(CN) ]/K [Fe(CN) ] redox couple in solution. An increase in charge transfer resistance (R ) was observed upon 4J structure formation, the value of which depends on the analyte length. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to further characterize the sensor and monitor the electrochemical reaction in conjunction with thickness measurements of the mixed DNA monolayer obtained using spectroscopic ellipsometry. In addition, the electron transfer was calculated at the electrode/electrolyte interface using a rotating disk electrode. Limits of detection in the femtomolar range were achieved for nucleic acid targets of different lengths (22 nt, 60 nt, 200 nt). The sensor produced only a background signal in the presence of single base mismatched analytes, even in hundred times excess in concentration. This label-free and highly selective biosensing platform is versatile and can be used for universal detection of nucleic acids of varied lengths which could revolutionize point of care diagnostics for applications such as bacterial or cancer screening.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524882
[Au] Autor:Ajiboye TO; Skiebe E; Wilharm G
[Ad] Address:Antioxidants, Redox Biology and Toxicology Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Health Sciences, Nile University of Nigeria, FCT-Abuja, Nigeria; Project Group P2, Robert Koch Institute, Wernigerode Branch, Germany. Electronic address: toajiboye@nileuniversity.edu.ng.
[Ti] Title:Phenolic acids potentiate colistin-mediated killing of Acinetobacter baumannii by inducing redox imbalance.
[So] Source:Biomed Pharmacother;101:737-744, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1950-6007
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Phenolic acids with catechol groups are good prooxidants because of their low redox potential. In this study, we provided data showing that phenolic acids, caffeic acid, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid, enhanced colistin-mediated bacterial death by inducing redox imbalance. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of these phenolic acids against Acinetobacter baumannii AB5075 were considerably lowered for ΔsodB and ΔkatG mutants. Checkerboard assay shows synergistic interactions between colistin and phenolic acids. The phenolic acids exacerbated colistin-induced oxidative stress in A. baumannii AB5075 through increased superoxide anion generation, NAD + /NADH and ADP/ATP ratio. In parallel, the level of reduced glutathione was significantly lowered. We conclude that phenolic acids potentiate colistin-induced oxidative stress in A. baumannii AB5075 by increasing ROS generation, energy metabolism and electron transport chain activity with a concomitant decrease in glutathione.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524876
[Au] Autor:Chang Z; Tian L; Wu M; Dong X; Peng J; Pan B
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Environmental Science & Engineering, Kunming University of Science & Technology, Kunming 650500, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Molecular markers of benzene polycarboxylic acids in describing biochar physiochemical properties and sorption characteristics.
[So] Source:Environ Pollut;237:541-548, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6424
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biochar function in soil is based on properties such as sorption characteristics, and these are expected to change throughout the life cycle of the biochar. Because biochar particles cannot easily be separated from soil particles, this change is seldom investigated. Biochar-related molecular markers, such as benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) are promising tools for studying the properties of biochars in complex environmental matrices. In this study, biochars were derived from corn straw and pine wood sawdust at 200-500 C, and their aging was simulated with NaClO. Biochar properties were characterized by elemental analysis, BET surface characterization and BPCA molecular marker analysis. Chemical oxidation decreased the surface area (SA) but increased the O content of biochars. The oxidation decreased the amount of biochars, with a mass loss in the range of 10-55%. A similar mass loss was also observed for BPCAs and was negatively related to both the pyrolysis temperature and the extent of the condensed structure (higher aromaticity). The biochar amounts were calculated quantitatively using the sum of BPCA contents, with a conversion factor (the ratio of biochar amount to BPCA content) in the range of 3.3-5.5, and were negatively related to the B5CA content. Three model pollutants, namely, bisphenol A (BPA), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and phenanthrene (PHE), were chosen to study the sorption characteristics of biochar before and after oxidation. Chemical oxidation generally increased SMX sorption but decreased PHE sorption. The nonlinear factor n, based on Freundlich equation modeling, was negatively related to B6CA for all three chemicals. The BPCA molecular markers, especially B5CA and B6CA, were correlated to the biochar properties before and after oxidation and are thus a potentially useful technique for describing the characteristics of biochar in the environment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524863
[Au] Autor:Kasselman LJ; Vernice NA; DeLeon J; Reiss AB
[Ad] Address:Winthrop Research Institute and Department of Medicine, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, NY, USA. Electronic address: lkasselman@nyuwinthrop.org.
[Ti] Title:The gut microbiome and elevated cardiovascular risk in obesity and autoimmunity.
[So] Source:Atherosclerosis;271:203-213, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1484
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cardiovascular disease associated with obesity and autoimmunity is the leading cause of death in these populations and significant residual risk remains despite current treatment approaches. Obesity, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are linked to chronic inflammation, and subjects with these disorders have characteristic shifts in their gut microbiome composition. Recent data suggest that alterations in gut microbial and metabolic composition may be responsible, in part, for induction of chronic inflammation, thus promoting cardiovascular disease. Common microbiome changes observed in obesity, T1DM, RA, and SLE include a decrease in the ratio of bacteria, such as Gram-positive Firmicutes to Gram-negative Bacteroidetes, as well as an overabundance or depletion of certain species, including Prevotella copri. The consequent effects of these shifts include alterations in the metabolic composition of the gut, hyper-activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4), upregulation of inflammatory pathways, e.g. c-Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), increased intestinal permeability, increased C-reactive protein, and increased levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). Differential microbiome compositions may also explain sex differences observed in autoimmunity, where a male gut microbiome promotes anti-inflammatory processes as compared to a female pro-inflammatory gut microbiome. Intervention at the level of the microbiota appears to attenuate symptoms in these inflammatory syndromes with probiotic treatment, such as Lactobacilli, playing a uniquely beneficial role in restoring intestinal health, decreasing inflammation, and reducing cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss obesity, T1DM, RA, and SLE in the context of how each unique microbiome profile contributes to elevated cardiovascular risk.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524840
[Au] Autor:Desai M; Chauhan JB
[Ad] Address:P. G. Department of Genetics, Ashok and Rita Patel Institute of Integrated Study and Research in Biotechnology and Allied Science (ARIBAS), New Vallabh Vidyanagar, Affiliated to Sardar Patel University, India. Electronic address: mansidesai0@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Computational analysis for the determination of deleterious nsSNPs in human MTHFR gene.
[So] Source:Comput Biol Chem;74:20-30, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1476-928X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme involved in folate metabolism and plays a central role in DNA methylation and biosynthesis. MTHFR mutations may alter the cellular folate supply which in turn affects nucleic acid synthesis, DNA methylation and chromosomal damage. The identification of number of SNPs in the human genome growing nowadays and hence, the evaluation of functional & structural consequences of these SNPs is very laborious by means of experimental analysis. Therefore, in the present study, recently developed various computational algorithms have been used which can predict the functional and structural consequences of the SNPs. Various computational tools like SIFT, PolyPhen2, PROVEAN, SNAP2, nsSNPAnalyzer, SNPs&GO, PhD-SNP, PMut, I-Mutant, iPTREE-STAB and MUpro were used to predict most deleterious SNPs. Additionally, ConSurf was used to find amino acids conservation and NCBI conserved domain search tool to find conserved domains in MTHFR. Post translational modification sites were predicted using ModPred. SPARKS-X was used to generate 3D structure of the native and mutant MTHFR protein, ModRefiner for further refinement, Varify3D and RAMPAGE to validate structure. Ligand binding sites were predicted using FTsite, RaptorX binding and COACH. Three SNPs i.e. R157Q, L323P and W500C predicted the most deleterious in all the tools used for functional and stability analysis. Moreover, both residues R157, L323 and W500 were predicted highly conserved, buried and structural residues by ConSurf. Post translational modification sites were also predicted at R157 and W500. The ligand binding sites were predicted at R157, L323 and W500.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524823
[Au] Autor:Wang X; Yao J; Wang S; Pan X; Xiao R; Huang Q; Wang Z; Qu R
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China.
[Ti] Title:Phototransformation of estrogens mediated by Mn(III), not by reactive oxygen species, in the presence of humic acids.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;201:224-233, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Photodegradation of pollutants is classically explained by reaction with reactive oxygen species. However Mn(III) may also remove pollutants, but direct evidence is actually lacking. Here we investigated the role of soluble Mn(III) on phototransformation of four typical estrogens, namely estrone (E1), 17-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), in the presence of Mn(II) and humic acid. Conversion rates of 60.2%, 89.0%, 87.6%, and 80.2% were achieved for E1, E2, E3, and EE2, respectively, after 72 h visible light irradiation. A detailed quenching experiments revealed that soluble Mn(III), and not reactive oxygen species, was the oxidant responsible for estrogen removal. The determination of Mn(III) concentration provided direct proof of the role of Mn(III)-based oxidizers in the conversion of estrogens. Soluble Mn(III) can form complexes with humic acid, and about 6.51 M of Mn(III)-humic acid was formed from 20 M of Mn(II) in the presence of 5 mg/L of humic acid. Furthermore, product identification and theoretical computation demonstrated that estrogens are mainly converted into oligomers (dimers, trimers, tetramers, etc.) via a single-electron process. According to these results, the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III) is initiated by superoxide ion (O ) generated from dissolved oxygen in the presence of humic acid under visible light irradiation. The formed soluble Mn(III) strips the estrogens of a single electron to generate phenoxyl radicals, which undergo oligomerization, while leads to regeneration of Mn(II). Hence, the photochemical Mn(II)-Mn(III) redox cycling may significantly influence the fate and transformation of estrogens in waters.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524800
[Au] Autor:Horikoshi HM; Sekozawa Y; Kobayashi M; Saito K; Kusano M; Sugaya S
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. Electronic address: humberto_hmh@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Metabolomics analysis of 'Housui' Japanese pear flower buds during endodormancy reveals metabolic suppression by thermal fluctuation.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;126:134-141, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dormancy is a complex phenomenon that allows plants to survive the winter season. Studies of dormancy have recently attracted more attention due to the expansion of temperate fruit production in areas under mild winters and due to climate changes. This study aimed to identify and characterize the metabolic changes induced by chilling temperatures, as well as during thermal fluctuation conditions that simulate mild winter and/or climate change scenarios. To do this, we compared the metabolic profile of Japanese pear flower buds exposed to constant chilling at 6 C and thermal fluctuations of 6 C/18 C (150 h/150 h) during endodormancy. We detected 91 metabolites by gas chromatography paired with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) that could be classified into eight groups: amino acids, amino acid derivatives, organic acids, sugars and polyols, fatty acids and sterols, phenol lipids, phenylpropanoids, and other compounds. Metabolomics analysis revealed that the level of several amino acids decreased during endodormancy. Sugar and polyol levels increased during endodormancy during constant chilling and might be associated with chilling stress tolerance and providing an energy supply for resuming growth. In contrast, thermal fluctuations produced low levels of metabolites related to the pentose phosphate pathway, energy production, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in flower buds, which may be associated with failed endodormancy release. This metabolic profile contributes to our understanding of the biological mechanism of dormancy during chilling accumulation and clarifies the metabolic changes during mild winters and future climate change scenarios.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524782
[Au] Autor:Nagasaka H; Hirano KI; Yorifuji T; Komatsu H; Takatani T; Morioka I; Hirayama S; Miida T
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Takarazuka City Hospital, Takarazuka, Japan. Electronic address: Nagasaka@cnt-osaka.com.
[Ti] Title:Treatment with medium chain fatty acids milk of CD36-deficient preschool children.
[So] Source:Nutrition;50:45-48, 2017 Nov 29.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1244
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: CD36 deficiency is characterized by limited cellular long chain fatty acid uptake in the skeletal and cardiac muscles and often causes energy crisis in these muscles. However, suitable treatment for CD36 deficiency remains to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and metabolic effects of medium chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) in two CD36-deficient preschool children who often developed fasting hypoglycemia and exercise-induced myalgia. METHODS: Fasting blood glucose, total ketone bodies, and free fatty acids were examined and compared for usual supper diets and for diets with replacement of one component with 2 g/kg of 9% MCT-containing milk (MCT milk). Changes in serum creatine kinase and alanine aminotransferase levels, resulting from replacement of glucose water intake with 1 g/kg of MCT milk and determined by using bicycle pedaling tasks, were examined and compared. Hypoglycemic and/or myalgia episodes in daily life were also investigated. RESULTS: Biochemically, participants' blood glucose and total ketone bodies levels after overnight fasting substantially increased after dietary suppers containing MCT milk. Increases in serum creatine kinase and alanine aminotransferase levels resulting from the bicycle pedaling task were suppressed by MCT milk. Hypoglycemia leading to unconsciousness and tachycardia before breakfast decreased after introduction of dietary suppers containing MCT milk. Occurrence of myalgia in the lower limbs also decreased after intakes of MCT milk before long and/or strenuous exercising. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MCTs can prevent fasting hypoglycemia and exercise-induced myalgia in CD36-deficient young children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524781
[Au] Autor:Filimonova V; De Troch M; Gonalves F; Marques JC; Marques SM; Gonalves AMM; De Laender F
[Ad] Address:IMAR-CMA & MARE, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra, Portugal; Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal; Faculty of Science, Biology Department, Marine Biology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S8, B-9000 Gent, Bel
[Ti] Title:Effects of a herbicide and copper mixture on the quality of marine plankton.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;156:9-17, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pesticides and metals are often used in agriculture and are therefore often simultaneously discharged to nearby estuarine and marine areas. The effects of this organic-inorganic chemical mixture on food quality of aquatic organisms are currently unknown. In this study we test if a mixture of copper (inorganic) and the herbicide Primextra Gold TZ (organic) affects the quality of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and the copepod Acartia tonsa - two key species that fuel the local food-web. We quantified quality (i.e. energy content as food for the next trophic level) in terms of fatty acids, proteins and thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. We found non-additive effects (positive and negative) of the metal-herbicide mixture on the diatom and copepod species. In general, nutritionally important biochemical parameters of Acartia tonsa were most sensitive to the chemical stressors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 1012321 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524747
[Au] Autor:Yu S; Sheng L; Zhang C; Deng H
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Water Environment Evolution and Pollution Control in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region Area, Chongqing Three Gorges University, Wanzhou 404100, China.
[Ti] Title:Physiological response of Arundo donax to cadmium stress by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.
[So] Source:Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc;198:88-91, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3557
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present paper deals with the physiological response of the changes in chemical contents of the root, stem and leaf of Arundo donax seedlings stressed by excess cadmium using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique, cadmium accumulation in plant by atomic absorption spectroscopy were tested after different concentrations cadmium stress. The results showed that low cadmium concentrations (<1.0mg/L) the root tissue of Arundo donax uses osmosis of organic substances (e.g. carbohydrates and amino acids) to improve cadmium tolerance. Organic substances (e.g. carbohydrates) that contain a lot of OH in leaf were transported to the root firstly and then could chelate cadmium, but no obvious changes in stems were noted. The cadmium in the shoots (stem and leaf) usually increased with increasing cadmium concentration. These studies demonstrate the potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique for the non-invasive and rapid monitoring of the plants stressed with heavy metals, Arundo donax is suitable for phytoremediation of cadmium -contaminated wetland.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


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