Database : MEDLINE
Search on : acrodermatitis [Words]
References found : 2161 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 217 go to page                         

  1 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29326283
[Au] Autor:Wells L; Mahil S
[Ad] Address:Paediatric department, Evelina Children's Hospital, London, UK lyndonbenjamin.wells@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Rash on extensor surfaces of a child.
[So] Source:BMJ;360:j5547, 2018 01 11.
[Is] ISSN:1756-1833
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acrodermatitis/virology
Exanthema/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Buttocks/virology
Child, Preschool
Elbow/virology
Face/virology
Humans
Knee/virology
Male
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180113
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1136/bmj.j5547

  2 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29293267
[Au] Autor:Dittmer MR; Willis MS; Selby JC; Liu V
[Ad] Address:Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa.
[Ti] Title:Septolobular panniculitis in disseminated Lyme borreliosis.
[So] Source:J Cutan Pathol;45(4):274-277, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0560
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lyme disease classically evolves through clinical manifestations according to the stage of illness. Because many of the systemic symptoms are non-specific, and because serology may yield false negative results, cutaneous findings merit even greater importance to diagnosis. The prototypical skin lesion, erythema migrans (EM), occurs early and is the only independent diagnostic clinical feature according to the guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. EM itself has protean guises, being, at times, vesicular, indurated, necrotic, purpuric, solid, or targetoid, but it is not the sole Borrelia-associated skin lesion. Acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and borrelial lymphocytoma cutis are other well-known skin manifestations. A rare cutaneous manifestation that is increasingly reported in Lyme patients is panniculitis, which develops after dissemination of the spirochete. We present such a case in a patient who was initially treated for cellulitis as well as neck and radicular leg pain, thereby expanding the cutaneous spectrum of Lyme disease.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/cup.13100

  3 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29469698
[Au] Autor:Wu D; Fung MA; Kiuru M; Sharon VR
[Ti] Title:Acquired bullous acrodermatitis enteropathica as a histologic mimic of pemphigus foliaceus in a patient on parenteral nutrition.
[So] Source:Dermatol Online J;23(7), 2017 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1087-2108
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Acquired zinc deficiency can develop as a consequence of poor nutritional intake or from dependence on total parenteral nutrition. Acquired zinc deficiency dermatitis classically manifests with erosions and scaly plaques in a periorificial and acral distribution. We present a case of a woman on parenteral nutrition who presented with bullous acrodermatitis mimicking pemphigus foliaceus histopathologically. This case highlights clinical and histopathologic variants of zinc deficiency that may lead to a delay in diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29462920
[Au] Autor:Bin BH; Hojyo S; Seo J; Hara T; Takagishi T; Mishima K; Fukada T
[Ad] Address:Division of Pathology, Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan. bbh82429@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:The Role of the Slc39a Family of Zinc Transporters in Zinc Homeostasis in Skin.
[So] Source:Nutrients;10(2), 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6643
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The first manifestations that appear under zinc deficiency are skin defects such as dermatitis, alopecia, acne, eczema, dry, and scaling skin. Several genetic disorders including acrodermatitis enteropathica (also known as Danbolt-Closs syndrome) and Brandt's syndrome are highly related to zinc deficiency. However, the zinc-related molecular mechanisms underlying normal skin development and homeostasis, as well as the mechanism by which disturbed zinc homeostasis causes such skin disorders, are unknown. Recent genomic approaches have revealed the physiological importance of zinc transporters in skin formation and clarified their functional impairment in cutaneous pathogenesis. In this review, we provide an overview of the relationships between zinc deficiency and skin disorders, focusing on the roles of zinc transporters in the skin. We also discuss therapeutic outlooks and advantages of controlling zinc levels via zinc transporters to prevent cutaneous disorganization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29439479
[Au] Autor:Ogawa Y; Kinoshita M; Shimada S; Kawamura T
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi 409-3898, Japan. yogawa@yamanashi.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Zinc and Skin Disorders.
[So] Source:Nutrients;10(2), 2018 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6643
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The skin is the third most zinc (Zn)-abundant tissue in the body. The skin consists of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue, and each fraction is composed of various types of cells. Firstly, we review the physiological functions of Zn and Zn transporters in these cells. Several human disorders accompanied with skin manifestations are caused by mutations or dysregulation in Zn transporters; acrodermatitis enteropathica (Zrt-, Irt-like protein (ZIP)4 in the intestinal epithelium and possibly epidermal basal keratinocytes), the spondylocheiro dysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (ZIP13 in the dermal fibroblasts), transient neonatal Zn deficiency (Zn transporter (ZnT)2 in the secretory vesicles of mammary glands), and epidermodysplasia verruciformis (ZnT1 in the epidermal keratinocytes). Additionally, acquired Zn deficiency is deeply involved in the development of some diseases related to nutritional deficiencies (acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica, necrolytic migratory erythema, pellagra, and biotin deficiency), alopecia, and delayed wound healing. Therefore, it is important to associate the existence of mutations or dysregulation in Zn transporters and Zn deficiency with skin manifestations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29422292
[Au] Autor:Akiyama M; Takeichi T; McGrath JA; Sugiura K
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. Electronic address: makiyama@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Autoinflammatory keratinization diseases: An emerging concept encompassing various inflammatory keratinization disorders of the skin.
[So] Source:J Dermatol Sci;, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-569X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Classifying inflammatory skin diseases is challenging, especially for the expanding group of disorders triggered by genetic factors resulting in hyperactivated innate immunity that result in overlapping patterns of dermal and epidermal inflammation with hyperkeratosis. For such conditions, the umbrella term "autoinflammatory keratinization diseases" (AIKD) has been proposed. AIKD encompasses diseases with mixed pathomechanisms of autoinflammation and autoimmunity, and includes IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra)-related pustulosis, CARD14-mediated pustular psoriasis, pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) type V, and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC). Mechanistically, the entities include generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) without psoriasis vulgaris, impetigo herpetiformis and acrodermatitis continua, which are IL-36Ra-related pustuloses caused by loss-of-function mutations in IL36RN; GPP with psoriasis vulgaris and palmoplantar pustular psoriasis which are CARD14-mediated pustular psoriasiform dermatoses with gain-of-function variants of CARD14; PRP type V which is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CARD14; and, familial KLC in which mutations in NLRP1, an inflammasome sensor protein predominantly expressed in skin, have been identified. It is likely that further inflammatory keratinization disorders will also fall within the concept of AIKD, as elucidation of novel pathogenic mechanisms of inflammatory keratinization diseases emerges. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of AIKD is likely to lead to innovative, targeted therapies that benefit patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 29412435
[Au] Autor:Ciampo IRLD; Sawamura R; Ciampo LAD; Fernandes MIM
[Ad] Address:Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brasil.
[Ti] Title:ACRODERMATITE ENTEROPÁTICA: MANIFESTAÇÕES CLÍNICAS E DIAGNÓSTICO PEDIÁTRICO. ACRODERMATITIS ENTEROPATHICA: CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND PEDIATRIC DIAGNOSIS.
[So] Source:Rev Paul Pediatr;:0, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1984-0462
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por; eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To report a case of acrodermatitis enteropathica, a rare disease with autosomal recessive inheritance. CASE DESCRIPTION: An 11-month-old boy was presenting symmetrical erythematous and yellowish-brownish crusted lesions on his face, feet, hands and knees, intermittent diarrhea, fever, and recurrent infections since the age of six months. He was thin and had scarce hair on the scalp. The serum zinc level was measured and a reduced level of 27.0 mcg/dL (normal range: 50.0-120.0) was identified. Oral supplementation with 2.0 mg/kg/day of zinc sulfate was immediately initiated. A rapid and progressive improvement of symptoms was observed. The symptoms reappeared with an attempt to stop supplementation. COMMENTS: Recognizing and properly treating acrodermatitis enteropathica is important to prevent complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29387608
[Au] Autor:Haneke E
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Nail psoriasis: clinical features, pathogenesis, differential diagnoses, and management.
[So] Source:Psoriasis (Auckl);7:51-63, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2230-326X
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Psoriasis is the skin disease that most frequently affects the nails. Depending on the very nail structure involved, different clinical nail alterations can be observed. Irritation of the apical matrix results in psoriatic pits, mid-matrix involvement may cause leukonychia, whole matrix affection may lead to red lunulae or severe nail dystrophy, nail bed involvement may cause salmon spots, subungual hyperkeratosis, and splinter hemorrhages, and psoriasis of the distal nail bed and hyponychium causes onycholysis whereas that of the proximal nail fold causes psoriatic paronychia. The more extensive the involvement, the more severe is the nail destruction. Pustular psoriasis may be seen as yellow spots under the nail or, in case of acrodermatitis continua suppurativa, as an insidious progressive loss of the nail organ. Nail psoriasis has a severe impact on quality of life and may interfere with professional and other activities. Management includes patient counseling, avoidance of stress and strain to the nail apparatus, and different types of treatment. Topical therapy may be tried but is rarely sufficiently efficient. Perilesional injections with corticosteroids and methotrexate are often beneficial but may be painful and cannot be applied to many nails. All systemic treatments clearing widespread skin lesions usually also clear the nail lesions. Recently, biologicals were introduced into nail psoriasis treatment and found to be very effective. However, their use is restricted to severe cases due to high cost and potential systemic adverse effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180204
[Lr] Last revision date:180204
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2147/PTT.S126281

  9 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29387600
[Au] Autor:Benjegerdes KE; Hyde K; Kivelevitch D; Mansouri B
[Ad] Address:Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple.
[Ti] Title:Pustular psoriasis: pathophysiology and current treatment perspectives.
[So] Source:Psoriasis (Auckl);6:131-144, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2230-326X
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease that classically affects skin and joints and is associated with numerous comorbidities. There are several clinical subtypes of psoriasis including the uncommon pustular variants, which are subdivided into generalized and localized forms. Generalized forms of pustular psoriasis include acute generalized pustular psoriasis, pustular psoriasis of pregnancy, and infantile and juvenile pustular psoriasis. Localized forms include acrodermatitis continua of Hallopeau and palmoplantar pustular psoriasis. These subtypes vary in their presentations, but all have similar histopathologic characteristics. The immunopathogenesis of each entity remains to be fully elucidated and some debate exists as to whether these inflammatory pustular dermatoses should be classified as entities distinct from psoriasis vulgaris. Due to the rarity of these conditions and the questionable link to the common, plaque-type psoriasis, numerous therapies have shown variable results and most entities remain difficult to treat. With increasing knowledge of the pathogenesis of these variants of pustular psoriasis, the development and use of biologic and other immunomodulatory therapies holds promise for the future of successfully treating pustular variants of psoriasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180204
[Lr] Last revision date:180204
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2147/PTT.S98954

  10 / 2161 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29382519
[Au] Autor:Martínez-Bustamante ME; Peña-Vélez R; Almanza-Miranda E; Aceves-Barrios CA; Vargas-Pastrana T; Morayta-Ramírez Corona ARR
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Infectología Pediátrica, Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE, Ciudad de México, México.
[Ti] Title:Acrodermatitis enteropática. [Acrodermatitis enteropathica].
[So] Source:Bol Med Hosp Infant Mex;74(4):295-300, 2017 Jul - Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1665-1146
[Cp] Country of publication:Mexico
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a low-incidence disease due to inherited or acquired zinc deficiency. It is characterized by acral dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea and growth retardation. The dermatological condition may mimic a cutaneous fungal infection or other pathogen-related skin diseases. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a female patient of 7 months of age, who was sent to Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre for suspicion of immunodeficiency and cutaneous mycosis. Her condition began with dermatosis disseminated to the head, trunk and genital region; initial treatment with antifungal and broad spectrum antibiotics was given, without improvement. Upon admission, immunodeficiency and fungal infection were discarded. Acrodermatitis enteropathica was suspected, and corroborated later by low serum zinc levels. Immediately after the start of oral treatment with zinc, the patient showed improvement. CONCLUSIONS: There are multiple differential diagnoses of acrodermatitis enteropathica, which includes cutaneous infections. Therefore, the early recognition of the characteristic lesions favors suspicion, diagnosis and appropriate treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180131
[Lr] Last revision date:180131
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


page 1 of 217 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information