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[PMID]: 29188295
[Au] Autor:Richardson L; Hameed Y; Perez J; Jones PB; Kirkbride JB
[Ad] Address:PsyLife Group, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, England.
[Ti] Title:Association of Environment With the Risk of Developing Psychotic Disorders in Rural Populations: Findings from the Social Epidemiology of Psychoses in East Anglia Study.
[So] Source:JAMA Psychiatry;75(1):75-83, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6238
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Social determinants are important risk factors for the development of first-episode psychosis (FEP); their effects in rural areas are largely unknown. Objective: To investigate neighborhood-level factors associated with FEP in a large, predominantly rural population-based cohort. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study extracted data on referrals for treatment of potential FEP at 6 Early-Intervention Psychosis services from the Social Epidemiology of Psychoses in East Anglia naturalistic cohort study data set, which covered a population of more than 2 million people in a rural area in the East of England for a period of 3.5 years. All individuals aged 16 to 35 years who presented to Early-Intervention Psychosis services and met diagnostic criteria for first episodes of nonaffective psychoses and affective psychoses (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision diagnostic codes F20-33) were included (n = 631). Persons whose disorders had an organic basis (diagnostic codes F06.X) and those meeting the criteria for substance-induced psychosis (diagnostic codes F1X.5) were excluded. We derived 4 neighborhood-level exposures from a routine population data set using exploratory factor analysis (racial/ethnic diversity, deprivation, urbanicity, and social isolation) and investigated intragroup racial/ethnic density and fragmentation. Main Outcomes and Measures: Multilevel Poisson regression was performed to determine associations between incidence rates and neighborhood-level factors, after adjustment for individual factors. Results were reported as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results: The study included 631 participants who met criteria for FEP and whose median age at first contact was 23.8 years (interquartile range, 19.6-27.6 years); 416 of 631 (65.9%) were male. Crude incidence of FEP was calculated as 31.2 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI, 28.9-33.7). Incidence varied significantly between neighborhoods after adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. For nonaffective psychoses, incidence was higher in neighborhoods that were more economically deprived (IRR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06-1.20) and socially isolated (IRR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.04-1.19). It was lower in more racially/ethnically diverse neighborhoods (IRR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87-1.00). Higher intragroup racial/ethnic density (IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94-1.00) and lower intragroup racial/ethnic fragmentation (IRR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1.00) were associated with a reduced risk of affective psychosis. Conclusions and Relevance: Spatial variation in the incidence of nonaffective and affective psychotic disorders exists in rural areas. This suggests that the social environment contributes to psychosis risk across the rural-urban gradient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2017.3582

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[PMID]: 29173737
[Au] Autor:Peris TS; Rozenman MS; Sugar CA; McCracken JT; Piacentini J
[Ad] Address:UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Los Angeles. Electronic address: tperis@mednet.ucla.edu.
[Ti] Title:Targeted Family Intervention for Complex Cases of Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry;56(12):1034-1042.e1, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1527-5418
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Although evidence-based treatments for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exist, many youth fail to respond, and interventions tailored to the needs of specific subsets of patients are lacking. This study examines the efficacy of a family intervention module designed for cases of OCD complicated by poor family functioning. METHOD: Participants were 62 youngsters aged 8 to 17 years (mean age = 12.71 years; 57% male; 65% white) with a primary diagnosis of OCD and at least 2 indicators of poor family functioning. They were randomized to receive 12 sessions of individual child cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus weekly parent psychoeducation and session review (standard treatment [ST]) or the same 12 child sessions plus 6 sessions of family therapy aimed at improving OCD-related emotion regulation and problem solving (positive family interaction therapy [PFIT]). Blinded raters evaluated outcomes and tracked responders to 3-month follow-up. RESULTS: Compared to ST, PFIT demonstrated better overall response rates on the Clinician Global Impression-Improvement scale (CGI-I; 68% versus 40%, p = .03, φ = 0.28) and rates of remission (58% PFIT versus 27% ST, p = .01, φ = 0.32). PFIT also produced significantly greater reductions in functional impairment, symptom accommodation, and family conflict, and improvements in family cohesion. As expected, these shifts in family functioning constitute an important treatment mechanism, with changes in accommodation mediating treatment response. CONCLUSION: PFIT is efficacious for reducing OCD symptom severity and impairment and for improving family functioning. Findings are discussed in terms of personalized medicine and mechanisms of change in pediatric OCD treatment. Clinical trial registration information-Family Focused Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT01409642.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cognitive Therapy/methods
Family Therapy/methods
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/therapy
Parents/education
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Combined Modality Therapy
Family Relations
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/diagnosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Single-Blind Method
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29523015
[Au] Autor:Sterz J; Britz V; Münzberg M; Kadmon M; Schleicher I; Meder A; Kamp R; Janko M; Marzi I; Rüsseler M
[Ad] Address:Klinik für Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Frankfurt.
[Ti] Title:Die Wertigkeit des gemeinsamen Faches Orthopädie-Unfallchirurgie im 2. Staatsexamen ­ Vergleich der schriftlichen 2. Staatsexamina mit dem Nationalen Kompetenzbasierten Lernzielkatalog Chirurgie. [Weighting of Orthopaedics & Trauma Surgery in the Medical State Examination - Comparison of the Written Examination with the National Catalogue of Learning Objectives in Surgery].
[So] Source:Z Orthop Unfall;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1864-6743
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:ger
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The national competence-based catalogue of learning-goals in surgery (NKLC) defines competence levels for each of its 230 goals, including "competence level in 1: factual knowledge" up to "competence level 3: independent action". Aside from the cumulative examinations influencing the learning behaviour of students, those teaching targets do not affect the second state examination. This study analyses the extent to which the questions of the German second medical licensing examination compiled by the IMPP (central German institute for medical and pharmaceutical examinations) are congruent with the trauma-surgical and orthopaedic learning goals in the NKLC, in which this thematic focus is emphasised. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exam questions from autumn 2009 to autumn 2014 (n = 11) were retrospectively analysed. Orthopaedic and trauma-surgical teaching targets defined in NKLC were identified by five senior orthopaedic physicians and trauma surgery experts. All questions addressing one of these learning goals were identified and analysed (re: the number of learning goals, the number of questions addressing a trauma-surgical, or orthopaedic goal, as well as different competency levels). RESULTS: We found 113 learning goals of NKLC (49.1% of the overall NKLC learning goals) identified as orthopaedic or trauma surgery subjects. During the study period, 543 questions included teaching targets referring to orthopaedic or trauma surgery subjects (15.6% of the total of 3480 questions). Per exam, a mean of 49.36 ± 14.1 questions (minimum 30; maximum 80) was identified that addressed a learning goal referring to these issues. For each exam, 13.45 ± 6.39 (minimum 6; maximum 24) questions referred to learning goals of competence level 3a and b, 21.45 ± 9.94 (minimum 9; maximum 39) questions referred to learning goals of competence level 2, and 14.45 ± 6.36 (minimum 6; maximum 25) questions referred to learning goals of competence level 1. Most questions addressed the topic: "disorders of the rheumatic spectrum" (n = 16 questions in autumn 2009). CONCLUSION: Questions focusing on orthopaedic and trauma surgery appeared sufficiently often during the second state examination. There is a thematic imbalance, and important clinical learning goals tagged with high competence levels were not addressed in a satisfactory manner. This indicates that a clear adjustment between the state examination and NKLC is necessary.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0044-100930

  4 / 98429 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522958
[Au] Autor:Jacob L; Haro JM; Koyanagi A
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Medicine, University of Paris 5, 15 rue de l'École de Médecine, Paris 75006, France. Electronic address: louis.jacob.contacts@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Post-traumatic stress symptoms are associated with physical multimorbidity: Findings from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;232:385-392, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Studies on the association between symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and physical multimorbidity (i.e., ≥2 chronic conditions) are lacking. Thus, we assessed the association between PTSD symptoms and physical multimorbidity using nationally representative, community-based data of the UK adult population. METHODS: Data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey were analyzed. PTSD symptoms were assessed using the 10-item Trauma Screening Questionnaire (TSQ). A total score of ≥6 points indicated a probable PTSD. Information was collected on 20 doctor/other health professional diagnosed physical health conditions that were present in the past 12 months. Multimorbidity was defined as ≥2 physical diseases. Multivariable logistic regression and mediation analyses were conducted to analyze the association between PTSD and physical multimorbidity, and the influence of behavioral and psychological factors in this association. RESULTS: Among 7403 individuals aged ≥16 years [mean age (SD) = 46.3 (18.6) years; 51.5% females], the prevalence of PTSD increased from 2.1% in individuals with no physical conditions to 5.4% in those with ≥4 physical conditions. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors and lifetime occurrence of a traumatic event, PTSD was associated with higher odds for physical multimorbidity (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.47; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.71-3.56). Anxiety, depression, and disordered eating explained 35%, 21%, and 8% of the PTSD-multimorbidity association, respectively. LIMITATIONS: Causality or temporal associations cannot be established due to the cross-sectional nature of the study. In addition, PTSD and physical conditions were assessed using self-reports. CONCLUSIONS: PTSD symptoms may be risk factors for physical multimorbidity. Anxiety and depressive symptoms might play an important role in this association. Screening for chronic physical conditions among individuals with PTSD and treating them simultaneously may lead to better clinical outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29522942
[Au] Autor:Gulpers B; Lugtenburg A; Zuidersma M; Verhey FRJ; Voshaar RCO
[Ad] Address:VIRENZE-RIAGG Maastricht, METggz Maastricht, Regional Institute for Mental Health Care in Outpatients, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Maastricht University Medical Center, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS) / Alzheimer Centre Limburg and Department of Psychiatry and Psychology / MUMC, M
[Ti] Title:Anxiety disorders and figural fluency: A measure of executive function.
[So] Source:J Affect Disord;234:38-44, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2517
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Anxiety possibly interferes with executive functioning, although most studies rely on anxiety symptoms or lack control for comorbid depression. The objective of the present study is to examine the association between executive functioning and (individual) anxiety disorders with ak,ld without controlling for depression. METHOD: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder with and without agoraphobia, agoraphobia, social phobia, as well as depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview in 82,360 community-dwelling people participating in the Lifelines cohort. Figural fluency as a measure of executive functioning was assessed with the Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFTT). Linear regression analyses with the RFFT score as the dependent variable and psychiatric diagnosis as independent variables (dummies) were performed, adjusted for potential confounders. Multivariate results are presented with and without adjustment for depression. RESULTS: Presence of any anxiety disorder was associated with worse performance on the RFFT (B = - 0.78, SE = 0.32, p = .015), independent of depression. No dose-response relationship with the number of anxiety disorders was found. Only agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder were significantly associated with the RFFT score in the multivariate models. Agoraphobia remained significant when further adjusted for depressive disorder (B = - 1.14, SE = 0.41, p < .01), while GAD did not (B = 0.013, SE = 0.431, p = .975). LIMITATIONS: Executive function was tested by only one measure, namely figural fluency. CONCLUSION: Agoraphobia is associated with worse executive functioning. Treatment of agoraphobia could be influenced by the executive dysfunction which clinicians should be aware of when regular treatment fails.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29522613
[Au] Autor:Bella ME
[Ad] Address:Sala de Internación Psiquiatría Pediátrica, Hospital de Niños de la Santísima Trinidad de Córdoba. Facultad de Medicina UNC y UCC. bellamonica@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Experiencia de una sala de internación de psiquiatría en un hospital pediátrico de la provincia de Córdoba (Argentina): entre cambios epidemiológicos y legislativos. [Experience of a psychiatric unit in a pediatric hospital in the Province of Córdoba (Argentina): Between epidemiological and legislative changes].
[So] Source:Vertex;XXVIII(131):33-39, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0327-6139
[Cp] Country of publication:Argentina
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:In the past decades, several epidemiological changes have been observed in the demand for child mental health care with an increase in the number of visits as well as hospitalizations due to mental causes. These changes, together with the sanitary guidelines related to mental health, lead to the implementation of a mental health care unit at a pediatric hospital, which required the adjustment of the infrastructure as well as the professional resources available. The diagnosis of the situation and the sanitary context that led to the implementation of the care unit are presented. The performance/management indicators of the psychiatric unit for the period 2009-2015 are: hospitalization cause, psychopathological diagnosis and prolonged hospitalization cause. The hospitalization of children with mental disorders at a pediatric hospital occurs at the crossroads of two paradigms: mental health and pediatrics.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 98429 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505535
[Au] Autor:Yokoyama Y; Kakudate N; Sumida F; Matsumoto Y; Gordan VV; Gilbert GH
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, Fujisawa City, Kanagawa.
[Ti] Title:Dentist's distress in the management of chronic pain control: The example of TMD pain in a dental practice-based research network.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9553, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We aimed to obtain greater understanding of dentists' distress when they diagnose and treat patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and to explore ways in which TMD can be better treated.We conducted a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey of dentists (n = 148). Dentists were queried using an open-ended questionnaire about distress they experienced when treating patients with TMD. Survey responses were analyzed using mixed methods. Associations between specific dentist and patient characteristics and types of distress were analyzed by one way analysis of variance and residual analysis.One hundred thirteen clinicians responded to the questionnaire, giving a 76% response rate. Thematic analysis identified 6 major themes: difficulty in predicting therapeutic effect and prognosis; difficulty in diagnosis; difficulty in the decision about whether to do occlusal adjustment; difficulty in specifying a cause; difficulty in communicating with patients and mental factors; and health insurance system barriers. Clinicians who reported difficulty in deciding whether to do occlusal adjustment saw significantly more patients who experienced shoulder stiffness and headache (P = .008 and P = .022, respectively). Dentists' knowledge of TMD guidelines was associated with a lower percentage of difficulty in predicting therapeutic effect and prognosis (residual analysis; P = .010).These findings provide important insights into clinician's perception of difficulties with patients experiencing TMD-related pain. Knowledge of the existence of TMD clinical practice guidelines may lower dentist distress, particularly with regard to prognosis. Further studies are needed to decrease dentist's distress and to overcome the evidence-practice gap in TMD treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dentists/psychology
Pain Management/psychology
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Chronic Pain/etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009553

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[PMID]: 28455636
[Au] Autor:Duprey EB; Oshri A; Caughy MO
[Ad] Address:The Youth Development Institute, Human Development and Family Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. erinn.duprey@uga.edu.
[Ti] Title:Childhood Neglect, Internalizing Symptoms and Adolescent Substance Use: Does the Neighborhood Context Matter?
[So] Source:J Youth Adolesc;46(7):1582-1597, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6601
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Childhood neglect is associated with risk behaviors in adolescence, including substance use. There is evidence that internalizing behaviors may serve as a mechanism linking childhood neglect and substance use; however, further research is needed to examine this developmental pathway. According to developmental and ecological approaches, the neighborhood context and the developmental timing of maltreatment should both be considered when examining the sequelae of childhood neglect. Hence, the present study uses a longitudinal sample of youth (N = 965, 49.1% female, 59.2% African-American) to examine the influence of timing in the relationship between childhood neglect and adolescent psychopathology, and to examine the indirect effects of child neglect on substance use via internalizing symptoms in adolescence. Furthermore, the role of neighborhood disorder in this indirect effect was tested. Five data collection time points were used: Time 1(M = 4.557, SD = .701), Time 2 (M = 6.422, SD = .518), Time 3 (M = 12.370, SD = .443), Time 4 (M = 14.359, SD = .452), and Time 5 (M = 16.316, SD = .615). The findings showed that internalizing problems mediated the link between the severity of neglect in early childhood and adolescent substance use, and this pathway was moderated by neighborhood disorder. These results have implications for preventative interventions aimed toward reducing substance use for at-risk adolescents.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Child Abuse/diagnosis
Child Abuse/psychology
Internal-External Control
Residence Characteristics
Substance-Related Disorders/diagnosis
Substance-Related Disorders/psychology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Child Abuse/statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Emotional Adjustment
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data
Risk-Taking
Social Change
Statistics as Topic
Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10964-017-0672-x

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[PMID]: 29520885
[Au] Autor:Slawinski BL; Talge N; Ingersoll B; Smith A; Glazier A; Kerver J; Paneth N; Racicot K
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, College of Social Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
[Ti] Title:Maternal cytomegalovirus sero-positivity and autism symptoms in children.
[So] Source:Am J Reprod Immunol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0897
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PROBLEM: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders in the United States. While ASD can be significantly influenced by genetics, prenatal exposure to maternal infections has also been implicated in conferring risk. Despite this, the effects of several important maternal pathogens, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2), remain unknown. METHOD OF STUDY: We tested whether maternal CMV and/or HSV2 sero-positivity was associated with ASD symptoms in children. ELISA was used to assay for CMV IgG and HSV2 IgG in serum from the mothers of 82 children whose ASD symptoms were assessed at 3-6 years of age using the Social Responsiveness Scale version 2 (SRS-2). RESULTS: Associations between maternal viral serostatus and SRS-2 scores were estimated using linear regression with covariate adjustments. The children of mothers sero-positive for CMV, but not for HSV2, had SRS-2 scores 3.6-4.2 points higher, depending on the adjustment model, than sero-negative women, a significant finding, robust to several statistical adjustments. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that maternal CMV infections may influence ASD symptoms. These findings are being further evaluated in ongoing prospective studies with larger population samples.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/aji.12840

  10 / 98429 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520539
[Au] Autor:Díaz-Caneja CM; Morón-Nozaleda MG; Vicente-Moreno RP; Rodríguez-Toscano E; Pina-Camacho L; de la Serna E; Sugranyes G; Baeza I; Romero S; Sánchez-Gistau V; Castro-Fornieles J; Moreno C; Moreno D
[Ad] Address:Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, IiSGM, CIBERSAM, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense, C/Ibiza 43, 28009, Madrid, Spain. covadonga.martinez@iisgm.com.
[Ti] Title:Temperament in child and adolescent offspring of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
[So] Source:Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1435-165X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Shared vulnerability in offspring of individuals with schizophrenia (SzO) and bipolar disorder (BpO) might manifest early during development through common temperament traits. Temperament dimensions in child and adolescent BpO (N = 80), SzO (N = 34) and the offspring of community controls (CcO) (N = 101) were assessed using the Revised Dimensions of Temperament Survey. The association between temperament dimensions and lifetime psychopathology (including threshold and subthreshold DSM-IV-TR diagnoses) and current socio-academic adjustment was assessed using logistic regression. Fully adjusted models showed that both BpO and SzO scored significantly lower in the positive mood dimension and in the adaptability factor than CcO, with small-medium effect sizes (Cohen's d ~ 0.3-0.5). BpO also scored lower in the activity factor and the activity dimensions than CcO (Cohen's d ~ 0.3). Lower scores in the positive mood dimension were associated with increased risk of impaired adjustment both in BpO [OR 2.30, 95% CI (1.18-4.46)] and in SzO [OR 2.87, 95% CI (1.07-7.66)]. In BpO, lower scores in positive mood were also associated with increased likelihood of internalizing [OR 1.84, 95% CI (1.28-2.64)] and externalizing disorders [OR 1.48, 95% CI (1.01-2.18)]; in SzO, higher scores in activity and flexibility were associated with increased likelihood of internalizing [OR 2.31, 95% CI (1.22-4.38)] and externalizing disorders [OR 3.28, 95% CI (1.2-9)], respectively. Early difficulties in emotion regulation might represent a shared vulnerability phenotype in BpO and SzO. The identification of extreme temperament traits could help to characterize subgroups at greater risk of psychopathology and impaired adjustment, in which targeted interventions are warranted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00787-018-1135-y


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