Database : MEDLINE
Search on : agonistic and behavior [Words]
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[PMID]: 29474810
[Au] Autor:Partrick KA; Chassaing B; Beach LQ; McCann KE; Gewirtz AT; Huhman KL
[Ad] Address:Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, GA, 30303 USA. Electronic address: kpartrick1@student.gsu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Acute and repeated exposure to social stress reduces gut microbiota diversity in Syrian hamsters.
[So] Source:Behav Brain Res;345:39-48, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7549
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29474839
[Au] Autor:Weidt A; Gygax L; Palme R; Touma C; König B
[Ad] Address:Institute of Zoology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Impact of male presence on female sociality and stress endocrinology in wild house mice (Mus musculus domesticus).
[So] Source:Physiol Behav;189:1-9, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1873-507X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In group living animals, reproductive competition plays an important role in shaping social relationships and associations among female group members. In this study, we investigated the impact of male presence on the development of female-female competition and female sociality in groups of female wild house mice, using physiological and behavioral parameters. We predicted that, by eliciting intra-sexual competition, males influence social relationships among female group members and thus affect female associations to potential cooperation partners. To test this hypothesis we compared stress hormone production, the frequency of agonistic interactions, social hierarchies and social partner preferences in groups of unrelated, unfamiliar females in the absence and presence of males. Our results revealed no indication that the introduction of males into all-female groups of wild house mice elicited increased competition among female group members, neither on the physiological nor on the behavioral level. We found no effect of male presence on female glucocorticoid secretion, aggression, dominance hierarchies or on the females' sociability. Females thus seem not to intensely compete over access to males. This female ability to behaviorally and physiologically deal with even previously unfamiliar same-sex group members may be an important feature of female house mouse societies. In fact, it could be a necessary prerequisite to establish cooperative relationships between females in the context of reproduction, such as communal nursing of young.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518319
[Au] Autor:Hao M; Hou S; Xue L; Yuan H; Zhu L; Wang C; Wang B; Tang C; Zhang C
[Ti] Title:Further Developments of the Phenyl-Pyrrolyl Pentane Series of Non-steroidal Vitamin D Receptor Modulators as Anticancer Agents.
[So] Source:J Med Chem;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1520-4804
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Vitamin D3 receptor (VDR), belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a potential molecular target for anticancer drug discovery. In this study, a series of non-steroidal vitamin D analogs with phenyl-pyrrolyl pentane skeleton were synthesized with therapeutic potential for cancer treatment. Among them, 11b and 11g were identified as the most effective agents in reducing the viability of four cancer cell lines, particularly breast cancer cells, with IC50 values in the submicromolar concentration range. In addition, 11b and 11g possessed VDR binding affinity and displayed significant partial VDR agonistic activity determined by dual luciferase reporter assay and human leukemia cell line (HL-60 cells) differentiation assay. Furthermore, 11b and 11g inhibited tumor growth in the orthotopic breast tumor model due to the inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell apoptosis. More importantly, 11b and 11g, exhibiting favorable pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo, did not increase serum calcium levels or cause any other apparent side effects. In summary, 11b and 11g act as novel VDR modulators and may be promising candidates for cancer chemotherapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.jmedchem.8b00106

  4 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29407461
[Au] Autor:Merullo DP; Spool JA; Zhao C; Riters LV
[Ad] Address:Department of Integrative Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, USA. Electronic address: dmerullo@wisc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Co-localization patterns of neurotensin receptor 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase in brain regions involved in motivation and social behavior in male European starlings.
[So] Source:J Chem Neuroanat;89:1-10, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6300
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Animals communicate in distinct social contexts to convey information specific to those contexts, such as sexual or agonistic motivation. In seasonally-breeding male songbirds, seasonal changes in day length and increases in testosterone stimulate sexually-motivated song directed at females for courtship and reproduction. Dopamine and testosterone may act in the same brain regions to stimulate sexually-motivated singing. The neuropeptide neurotensin, acting at the neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1), can strongly influence dopamine transmission. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the degree to which seasonal changes in physiology modify interactions between neurotensin and dopamine to adjust context-appropriate communication. Male European starlings were examined in physiological conditions that stimulate season-typical forms of communication: late summer/early fall non-breeding condition (low testosterone; birds sing infrequently), late fall non-breeding condition (low testosterone; birds produce non-sexually motivated song), and spring breeding condition (high testosterone; males produce sexually-motivated song). Double fluorescent immunolabeling was performed to detect co-localization patterns between tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis) and NTR1 in brain regions implicated in motivation and song production (the ventral tegmental area, medial preoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, and lateral septum). Co-localization between TH and NTR1 was present in the ventral tegmental area for all physiological conditions, and the number of co-localized cells did not differ across conditions. Immunolabeling for TH and NTR1 was also present in the other examined regions, although no co-localization was seen. These results support the hypothesis that interactions between NTR1 and dopamine in the ventral tegmental area may modulate vocalizations, but suggest that testosterone- or photoperiod-induced changes in NTR1/TH co-localization do not underlie seasonally-appropriate adjustment of communication.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500808
[Au] Autor:Zhanaeva SY; Rogozhnikova AA; Alperina EL; Gevorgyan MM; Idov GV
[Ad] Address:Research Institute of Physiology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia. s.zhanaeva@physiol.ru.
[Ti] Title:Changes in Activity of Cysteine Cathepsins B and L in Brain Structures of Mice with Aggressive and Depressive-Like Behavior Formed under Conditions of Social Stress.
[So] Source:Bull Exp Biol Med;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1573-8221
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We studied activity of lysosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsins B and L, in brain structures (frontal cortex, caudate nucleus, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) of C57Bl/6J mice with aggressive and depressive-like behavior formed under conditions of chronic social stress (repeated experience of victories and defeats within 20 days). Mice with depressive-like behavior showed increased activity of cathepsin Ð’ in the hypothalamus and nucleus caudatus and increased activity of cathepsin L in the hippocampus compared to control animals not subjected to agonistic confrontations. In mice with aggressive behavior, protease activity in the studied brain structures was not changed. In 4 h after immune system activation with LPS (250 µg/kg), cathepsin L activity in the hippocampus of control mice increased in comparison with mice receiving saline. In contrast to control animals, LPS caused a decrease in activity of the enzyme in the caudate nucleus and frontal cortex of aggressive mice and in the hippocampus of mice with depressive-like behavior.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10517-018-4004-2

  6 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462694
[Au] Autor:Cutuli D; Berretta E; Caporali P; Sampedro-Piquero P; De Bartolo P; Laricchiuta D; Gelfo F; Pesoli M; Foti F; Farioli Vecchioli S; Petrosini L
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; Fondazione Santa Lucia, Rome, Italy. Electronic address: debora.cutuli@uniroma1.it.
[Ti] Title:Effects of pre-reproductive maternal enrichment on maternal care, offspring's play behavior and oxytocinergic neurons.
[So] Source:Neuropharmacology;, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7064
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Potentiating social, cognitive, and sensorimotor stimulations the Environmental Enrichment (EE) increases levels of novelty and complexity experienced by individuals. Growing evidence demonstrates that parental EE experience, even occurring in the pre-reproductive phase, affects behavioral and neural developmental trajectories of the offspring. To discover how the accumulation of early maternal complex experiences may inform and shape the social behavior of the following generation, we examined the effects of pre-reproductive enrichment of dams (post-natal days 21-72) on the play performances of their male and female adolescent offspring. Furthermore, we examined the effects of pre-reproductive enrichment on maternal behavior (during post-partum days 1-10) and male intruder aggression (on post-partum day 11). Since oxytocin modulates maternal care, social bonding, and agonistic behavior, the number of oxytocinergic neurons of the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei was examined in both dams and offspring. Results revealed that enriched females exhibited higher levels of pup-oriented behaviors, especially Crouching, and initiated pup-retrieval more quickly than standard females after the maternal aggression test. Such behavioral peculiarities were accompanied by increased levels of oxytocinergic neurons in PVN and SON. Moreover, pre-reproductive maternal EE cross-generationally influenced the offspring according to sex. Indeed, male pups born to enriched females exhibited a reduced play fighting associated with a higher number of oxytocinergic neurons in SON in comparison to male pups born to standard-housed females. In conclusion, pre-reproductive EE to the mothers affects their maternal care and has a cross-generational impact on the social behavior of their offspring that do not directly experiences EE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29330952
[Au] Autor:Taylor AB; Terhune CE; Toler M; Holmes M; Ross CF; Vinyard CJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Basic Science, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University, Vallejo, California.
[Ti] Title:Jaw-Muscle Fiber Architecture and Leverage in the Hard-Object Feeding Sooty Mangabey are not Structured to Facilitate Relatively Large Bite Forces Compared to Other Papionins.
[So] Source:Anat Rec (Hoboken);301(2):325-342, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1932-8494
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Numerous studies have sought to link craniofacial morphology with behavioral ecology in primates. Extant hard-object feeders have been of particular interest because of their potential to inform our understanding about the diets of early fossil hominins. Sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) are hard-object feeders that frequently generate what have been described as audibly powerful bites at wide jaw gapes to process materially stiff and hard seeds. We address the hypothesis that sooty mangabeys have features of the masticatory apparatus that facilitate this feeding behavior by comparing fiber architecture and leverage of the masseter and temporalis muscles between sooty mangabeys and three papionin primates that do not specialize on hard objects. Contrary to predictions, sooty mangabeys do not have relatively larger muscle physiologic cross-sectional areas or weights compared to other papionins, nor do they consistently display improved leverage. In this regard, sooty mangabeys differ in their morphology from other hard-object feeders such as tufted capuchins. However, males of all four papionin species converge on a shared pattern of relatively longer anterior superficial masseter fibers compared with female conspecifics, suggesting that males are likely prioritizing muscle stretch to improve gape performance as part of a behavioral repertoire that includes agonistic social interactions and intense male-male competition. These findings strengthen support for the hypothesis that gape display behaviors can exert a strong selective influence throughout the musculoskeletal masticatory apparatus. Results also raise questions about the morphological suitability of extant cercopithecines as models for interpreting feeding behavior and diet in fossil hominins with limited jaw gape capacity. Anat Rec, 301:325-342, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/ar.23718

  8 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29453997
[Au] Autor:Martín-López M; Muela AT; Cavas M; Navarro JF
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychobiology, Faculty of Psychology, Campus de Teatinos s/n, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain. Electronic address: mmmartin@uma.es.
[Ti] Title:Effects of para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA) on agonistic encounters between male mice.
[So] Source:Pharmacol Biochem Behav;167:9-16, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5177
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA) is a synthetic drug chemically similar to the recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") and often replaces MDMA in tablets that show an "ecstasy" logo. PMA displays a higher toxic potential than MDMA, but the behavioral profile of PMA has been scarcely studied in animal models. Here we evaluated the effects of PMA (2, 4, 8, and 12 mg/kg, i.p.) on agonist encounters between male mice using an ethopharmacological approach, the isolation-induced aggression model. Likewise, since PMA and MDMA share common mechanisms of action, we compared the behavioral profile of PMA with that induced by MDMA (8 mg/kg, i.p.) which behavioral effects in this model are well characterized. Individually housed mice were exposed to anosmic standard opponents 30 min after drug administration. The encounters were videotaped and evaluated using an ethologically based analysis. PMA (all doses) significantly reduced offensive behaviors (threat and attack), however, a detailed behavioral analysis suggests that the observed antiaggressive effect seems to be unspecific, showing a complex dose-dependent behavioral profile. Thus, antiaggresive actions observed after the administration of the lowest dose were accompanied by increases in social investigation, avoidance/flee behaviors and non-social explorations, together with a reduction of digging behavior. This pattern reflects both approach-contact behaviors and avoidance-flee behaviors. From 4 mg/kg to 12 mg/kg, the increase in social investigation previously observed disappears, and there is a slight increase in immobility, together with a different behavioral pattern that suggests anxiogenic effects of PMA, similar to those reported after the administration of MDMA. The higher doses of PMA exhibit a behavioral profile very similar to that observed in animals treated with MDMA, with the exception of the immobility produced by PMA. These findings show for the first time the non-specific antiaggressive profile of PMA in the model of aggression induced by isolation in male mice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29373814
[Au] Autor:Du Z; Johnston SD; Janssen T; Phillips CJC; Lisle A; Keeley T
[Ad] Address:Wildlife Biology Unit, School of Agriculture and Food Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton 4343, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: zilong.du@uq.net.au.
[Ti] Title:Behavioral and endocrine responses to season and social dynamics of captive male southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).
[So] Source:Gen Comp Endocrinol;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1095-6840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although southern hairy-nosed wombats (SHN wombats; Lasiorhinus latifrons) rarely breed in captivity, further knowledge of their reproductive physiology and behavior is likely to improve their breeding potential. This study examined the effect of seasonal variation and changes in social dynamics on the physiology and behavior of a captive population of male SHN wombats (n = 6). Seasonal changes in urinary testosterone metabolites (UTM), urinary cortisol metabolites (UCM), qualitative estimates of spermatorrhoea (QS), aggressive behavior and reproductive behavior were measured over an 11-month period. While there was no effect of month on QS (GLM ANOVA, P = 0.27), reproductive behavior (GLM ANOVA, P = 0.19) or aggressive behavior (Tukey pairwise comparisons), the secretion of UTM (GLM ANOVA, P = 0.051) was only marginally affected by season, compared to that reported for wild male SHN wombats. Mean UCM concentrations of July and August 2016 were significantly higher than those between October 2015 and January 2016 (Tukey pairwise comparisons). To examine social dynamics, two trials of animal positioning exchange with the enclosure system were implemented and behavioral data were examined for each trial over a six week period; UTM, UCM and general behaviors (n = 27) were measured for each trial. Neither UTM nor UCM concentration varied significantly (P ≥ 0.45) before and after the exchanges. "Scratching" decreased at the group level following the animal exchange in both trials, suggesting reduction in self-grooming may be a behavioral response to novel stimuli. UCM and UTM concentrations were both positively correlated with "standing still" and "body rub" behaviors. This may be evidence of a hormonal control of a "freezing behavioral response" to external stimuli and marking behavior, respectively. As there was no evidence that changing the social dynamics affected reproductive or agonistic behavior or hormone concentrations, it was concluded that captive male wombats in this study showed reduced reproductive seasonality compared to wild wombats and that animal exchange resulted in a behavioral response to novel stimuli but was not sufficient to affect testosterone or cortisol secretion, within the context of our study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 3173 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29189909
[Au] Autor:Fernández JB; Bastiaans E; Medina M; Méndez De la Cruz FR; Sinervo BR; Ibargüengoytía NR
[Ad] Address:Laboratorio de Ecofisiología e Historia de vida de Reptiles, Departamento de Zoología, Centro Regional Universitario Bariloche, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, INIBIOMA-CONICET, Quintral 1250, 8400, Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina. jimenafernandez@comahue-conicet.gob.ar.
[Ti] Title:Behavioral and physiological polymorphism in males of the austral lizard Liolaemus sarmientoi.
[So] Source:J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol;204(2):219-230, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1351
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Integrative behavioral studies show that the interplay between individual physiology and social behavior influences the ecology of the species, ultimately affecting individual fitness. Particularly in lizards, color polymorphism is associated with differential behaviors and reproductive strategies, which are evident in mature males during the mating season. Dominant males generally have greater endurance, higher body temperature, and larger bodies than submissive males, so they can acquire and defend larger territories and have greater access to females for mating. We studied whether the color morphs observed in males of one of the world's southernmost reptiles, Liolaemus sarmientoi, are related to behavioral variation during agonistic interactions, thermal physiology, morphology, and/or locomotor stamina. Liolaemus sarmientoi males exhibit three color morphs: red (RR), red-yellow (RY), and yellow (YY). These lizards exhibit subtle behavioral displays and we did not observe stamina differences among morphs. However, we found that RR males are more aggressive than YY males during agonistic encounters. In addition, greater body temperature change during trials, higher field body temperatures, and greater head sizes of RR males compared to RY or YY indicate that RR is a dominant morph, which may influence their ability to acquire and defend territory and tactics for achieving reproductive success.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00359-017-1233-1


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