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[PMID]: 29438430
[Au] Autor:Puig CG; Reigosa MJ; Valentão P; Andrade PB; Pedrol N
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Biology and Soil Science, University of Vigo, Vigo, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Unravelling the bioherbicide potential of Eucalyptus globulus Labill: Biochemistry and effects of its aqueous extract.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192872, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the worldwide search for new strategies in sustainable weed management, the use of plant species able to produce and release phytotoxic compounds into the environment could be an effective alternative to synthetic herbicides. Eucalyptus globulus Labill. is known to be a source of biologically active compounds responsible for its phytotoxic and allelopathic properties. Our previous results demonstrated the bioherbicide potential of eucalyptus leaves incorporated into the soil as a green manure, probably through the release of phytotoxins into the soil solution. Thus, the aims of this study were to understand the phytotoxicity of the eucalyptus leaves aqueous extract applied in pre- and post-emergence, and to identify and quantify its potentially phytotoxic water-soluble compounds. The effects were tested on the germination and early growth of the model target species Lactuca sativa and Agrostis stolonifera, and on physiological parameters of L. sativa adult plants after watering or spraying application. Dose-response curves and ED50 and ED80 values for eucalyptus aqueous extracts revealed pre-emergence inhibitory effects on both target species, effects being comparable to the herbicide metolachlor. While spraying treatment reduced the aerial and root biomass and increased the dry weight/fresh weight ratio of lettuce adult plants, watering application reduced protein contents and chlorophyll concentrations with respect to control, reflecting different modes of action depending on the site of phytotoxin entry. Via HPLC analyses, a total of 8 phenolic compounds (chlorogenic, two ρ-coumaric derivatives, ellagic, hyperoside, rutin, quercitrin, and kaempferol 3-O-glucoside) and other 5 low weight organic acids (citric, malic, shikimic, succinic and fumaric acids) were obtained from aqueous extract, the latter being identified for the first time in E. globulus. Despite some phytotoxic effects were found on lettuce adult plants, the use of eucalyptus aqueous extract would be discarded in post-emergence, whereas it was promising as a pre-emergence bioherbicide.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192872

  2 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29474701
[Au] Autor:Duchoslavová J; Jansa J
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Czech Republic.
[Ti] Title:The direction of carbon and nitrogen fluxes between ramets changes during ontogeny under simulated competition for light.
[So] Source:J Exp Bot;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Resource sharing is universal among connected ramets of clonal plants and is driven both by the developmental status of ramets and resource gradients. Aboveground competition forms spatial light gradients, but the role of resource sharing in such competition is unclear.We examined translocation of resources between mother and daughter ramets of Agrostis stolonifera under light heterogeneity throughout ramet ontogeny. We labelled ramets 13C and 15N to estimate bidirectional translocation of the resources at three developmental stages of daughters. In addition, we compared final biomass of integrated and severed ramets to estimate the effect of integration on growth.Young developing daughters were supported by carbon, whereas nitrogen was only translocated towards daughters at the beginning of rooting, regardless of the light conditions. Shading of mothers was a major determinant of resource translocation between developed ramets, with carbon being preferentially moved to daughters from shaded mothers while nitrogen translocation was limited from daughters to shaded mothers. Surprisingly, absolute amounts of translocated resources did not decline through development. Growth of daughters was enhanced by integration regardless of the shading.Overall, A. stolonifera maximizes the resource translocation pattern that enables it to spread from unfavourable habitats rather than compensate for light heterogeneity among ramets.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jxb/ery068

  3 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29261257
[Au] Autor:Fazekasová D; Boguská Z; Fazekas J; Skvareninová J; Chovancová J
[Ti] Title:Contamination of vegetation growing on soils and substrates in the unhygienic region of Central Spis (Slovakia) polluted by heavy metals.
[So] Source:J Environ Biol;37(6):1335-40, 2016 11.
[Is] ISSN:0254-8704
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present paper aims at clarifying the long-term impact of mining activities on the contamination of biotic components of the environment. The research was conducted in during 2011-2014 at selected locations of the cadastral territory of former mining towns of Central Spis (Slovakia) with different ecosystems of permanent grassland, mine waste sites and bankside vegetation. The results of the analysis showed that considerably dominant species at contaminated locations such as Betula pendula, Silene vulgaris, Geranium sylvaticum, Petasites hybridus, Mentha longifolia could absorb high quantities of heavy metals. The observed contents of heavy metals, especially zinc, copper and mercury in plants significantly exceeded the threshold values determined by law. The highest contamination as compared to the threshold values was found in young plants of Betula pendula in the Slovinky tailing pond site, in which zinc content exceeded the threshold value 852 times. Excess of copper content also exceeded the threshold value 271 times. The highest concentration of mercury in all of the surveyed sites was observed in dry matter of Betula pendula in the area of heap in the Por?c Valley, where threshold value was 184 times higher. Statistically significant locations similar in relation to the characteristic species and monitored heavy metals was recorded on the locations of tailing pond and heap as the most important centres of contamination with the following dominant species Betula pendula, Pinus silvestris and Agrostis capilaris.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Metals, Heavy/chemistry
Plants/chemistry
Soil Pollutants/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring
Slovakia
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Metals, Heavy); 0 (Soil Pollutants)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171221
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29357827
[Au] Autor:Xu Y; Huang B
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Biology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901, USA.
[Ti] Title:Transcriptomic analysis reveals unique molecular factors for lipid hydrolysis, secondary cell-walls and oxidative protection associated with thermotolerance in perennial grass.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;19(1):70, 2018 01 22.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Heat stress is the primary abiotic stress limiting growth of cool-season grass species. The objective of this study was to determine molecular factors and metabolic pathways associated with superior heat tolerance in thermal bentgrass (Agrostis scabra) by comparative analysis of transcriptomic profiles with its co-generic heat-sensitive species creeping bentgrass (A. stolonifera). RESULTS: Transcriptomic profiling by RNA-seq in both heat-sensitive A. stolonifera (cv. 'Penncross') and heat-tolerant A. scabra exposed to heat stress found 1393 (675 up- and 718 down-regulated) and 1508 (777 up- and 731 down-regulated) differentially-expressed genes, respectively. The superior heat tolerance in A. scabra was associated with more up-regulation of genes in oxidative protection, proline biosynthesis, lipid hydrolysis, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis, compared to heat-sensitive A. stolonifera. Several transcriptional factors (TFs), such as high mobility group B protein 7 (HMGB7), dehydration-responsive element-binding factor 1a (DREB1a), multiprotein-bridging factor 1c (MBF1c), CCCH-domain containing protein 47 (CCCH47), were also found to be up-regulated in A. scabra under heat stress. CONCLUSIONS: The unique TFs and genes identified in thermal A. scabra could be potential candidate genes for genetic modification of cultivated grass species for improving heat tolerance, and the associated pathways could contribute to the transcriptional regulation for superior heat tolerance in bentgrass species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-018-4437-z

  5 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29218538
[Au] Autor:Broadbent A; Stevens CJ; Peltzer DA; Ostle NJ; Orwin KH
[Ad] Address:Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YW, UK. a.broadbent2@lancaster.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:Belowground competition drives invasive plant impact on native species regardless of nitrogen availability.
[So] Source:Oecologia;186(2):577-587, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plant invasions and eutrophication are pervasive drivers of global change that cause biodiversity loss. Yet, how invasive plant impacts on native species, and the mechanisms underpinning these impacts, vary in relation to increasing nitrogen (N) availability remains unclear. Competition is often invoked as a likely mechanism, but the relative importance of the above and belowground components of this is poorly understood, particularly under differing levels of N availability. To help resolve these issues, we quantified the impact of a globally invasive grass species, Agrostis capillaris, on two co-occurring native New Zealand grasses, and vice versa. We explicitly separated above- and belowground interactions amongst these species experimentally and incorporated an N addition treatment. We found that competition with the invader had large negative impacts on native species growth (biomass decreased by half), resource capture (total N content decreased by up to 75%) and even nutrient stoichiometry (native species tissue C:N ratios increased). Surprisingly, these impacts were driven directly and indirectly by belowground competition, regardless of N availability. Higher root biomass likely enhanced the invasive grass's competitive superiority belowground, indicating that root traits may be useful tools for understanding invasive plant impacts. Our study shows that belowground competition can be more important in driving invasive plant impacts than aboveground competition in both low and high fertility ecosystems, including those experiencing N enrichment due to global change. This can help to improve predictions of how two key drivers of global change, plant species invasions and eutrophication, impact native species diversity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-017-4039-5

  6 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29214471
[Au] Autor:Lepinay C; Vondráková Z; Dostálek T; Münzbergová Z
[Ad] Address:Institute of Botany, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Zámek 1, 252 43, Pruhonice, Czech Republic. clementine.lepinay@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Duration of the conditioning phase affects the results of plant-soil feedback experiments via soil chemical properties.
[So] Source:Oecologia;186(2):459-470, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1939
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Plant-soil feedback (PSF) is a fundamental mechanism explaining plant community composition. Two-phase experiments, i.e., conditioning and feedback, represent a common methodology to study PSF. The duration of the conditioning phase varies among studies and the PSF observed is often explained by its biotic component. Little is known about the temporal variation of PSF and its abiotic component. As early life stages are crucial for plant establishment, we grew Rorippa austriaca in soil conditioned over 2, 4, 6 or 8 weeks by a conspecific or a co-occurring species, Agrostis capillaris. For each conditioning duration, we analysed the soil chemical properties and the direction and intensity of intra- or inter-specific feedbacks. With increasing duration, the negative intra- and inter-specific feedbacks became stronger and weaker, respectively. The inter-specific feedback was more negative than the intra-specific feedback at 2 weeks and this reversed thereafter. The Mg content decreased with conditioning duration whatever the conditioning species was. With increasing duration, conditioning by R. austriaca strongly decreased pH, while A. capillaris did not affect pH. The K and P contents were not affected by the conditioning duration and were higher in R. austriaca soil than in A. capillaris soil. Our results suggest that not only conditioning species but also duration of conditioning phase may affect the magnitude of PSF. The changes in soil chemical properties linked to the conditioning species or the conditioning phase duration may drive the feedbacks by affecting plant growth directly or via the interacting microbial communities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00442-017-4033-y

  7 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29197761
[Au] Autor:Miranda-Apodaca J; Pérez-López U; Lacuesta M; Mena-Petite A; Muñoz-Rueda A
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Biología Vegetal y Ecología, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao, Spain. Electronic address: jon.miranda@ehu.eus.
[Ti] Title:The interaction between drought and elevated CO in water relations in two grassland species is species-specific.
[So] Source:J Plant Physiol;220:193-202, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1618-1328
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Climate change can have major consequences for grassland communities since the different species of the community utilize different mechanisms for adaptation to drought and elevated CO levels. In addition, contradictory data exist when the combined effects of elevated CO and drought are analyzed because the soil water content is not usually similar between CO concentrations. Thus, the objectives of this work have been to examine the effect of water stress on plant water relations in two grassland species (Trifolium pratense and Agrostis capillaris), analyzing the possible differences between the two species when soil water content is equal in all treatments, and to elucidate if development under elevated CO increases drought tolerance and if so, which are the underlying mechanisms. At ambient CO , when soil volumetric water content was 15%, both species decreased their water potential in order to continue taking up water. Trifolium pratense performed osmotic adjustment, while Agrostis capillaris decreased the rigidity of its cell wall; moreover, both species increased the root to shoot ratio and decreased leaf area. However, these mechanisms were not sufficient to maintain cell turgor. Elevated CO partially mitigated the negative impact of drought on turgor potential in Trifolium pratense through a higher osmotic adjustment and root to shoot ratio and in Agrostis capillaris through a higher leaf relative water content caused by higher hydraulic conductance, but the impact of drought was not mitigated in either species by higher soil water conservation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171226
[Lr] Last revision date:171226
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29176773
[Au] Autor:Volterrani M; Minelli A; Gaetani M; Grossi N; Magni S; Caturegli L
[Ad] Address:Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Reflectance, absorbance and transmittance spectra of bermudagrass and manilagrass turfgrass canopies.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(11):e0188080, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Leaves act as a primary organ for the interception of solar radiation and their spatial arrangement determines how the plant canopy interacts with light. Many studies have been carried out on the penetration of radiation into crops however to date, few results are available on turfgrasses, mainly due to the difficulties of introducing sensors into the turf without disturbing the natural position of the leaves. In the present research two warm season turfgrasses, hybrid bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon × transvaalensis) 'Patriot' and manilagrass (Zoysia matrella) 'Zeon', were studied. The aim was to describe their canopy architecture grown with minimal disturbance to the natural arrangement of the leaves and stems, and to determine the potential effects of canopy architecture on light penetration and reflectance. Radiometric measurements were carried out at eight different profile levels of turfgrasses that were up to 12 cm tall. A LI-COR 1800 spectroradiometer with an optical fiber cable and a 7 mm diameter sensor was used. Measurements were carried out in the 390-1100 nm region at 5 nm intervals. The LAI value was higher for the manilagrass (9.0) than for the hybrid bermudagrass (5.6). The transmitted radiation was found to be closely dependent on downward cumulative LAI. Despite a more upright habit (mean insertion angle of 22.4° ±3.4), Zoysia matrella showed a higher NIR reflectance compared to Cdxt, which has a horizontal leaf arrangement (mean insertion angle 62.1° ± 9.6). The species studied showed substantial differences both in terms of phytometric characteristics and in the capacity to attenuate solar radiation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cynodon/physiology
Light
Poaceae/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biomass
Plant Leaves/physiology
Plant Leaves/radiation effects
Plant Shoots/physiology
Rain
Spectrum Analysis
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188080

  9 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29084267
[Au] Autor:Han YJ; Kim YS; Hwang OJ; Roh J; Ganguly K; Kim SK; Hwang I; Kim JI
[Ad] Address:Department of Biotechnology and Kumho Life Science Laboratory, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana brassinosteroid-related acyltransferase 1 gene induces brassinosteroid-deficient phenotypes in creeping bentgrass.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(10):e0187378, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Brassinosteroids (BRs) are naturally occurring steroidal hormones that play diverse roles in various processes during plant growth and development. Thus, genetic manipulation of endogenous BR levels might offer a way of improving the agronomic traits of crops, including plant architecture and stress tolerance. In this study, we produced transgenic creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) overexpressing a BR-inactivating enzyme, Arabidopsis thaliana BR-related acyltransferase 1 (AtBAT1), which is known to catalyze the conversion of BR intermediates to inactive acylated conjugates. After putative transgenic plants were selected using herbicide resistance assay, genomic integration of the AtBAT1 gene was confirmed by genomic PCR and Southern blot analysis, and transgene expression was validated by northern blot analysis. The transgenic creeping bentgrass plants exhibited BR-deficient phenotypes, including reduced plant height with shortened internodes (i.e., semi-dwarf), reduced leaf growth rates with short, wide, and thick architecture, high chlorophyll contents, decreased numbers of vascular bundles, and large lamina joint bending angles (i.e., erect leaves). Subsequent analyses showed that the transgenic plants had significantly reduced amounts of endogenous BR intermediates, including typhasterol, 6-deoxocastasterone, and castasterone. Moreover, the AtBAT1 transgenic plants displayed drought tolerance as well as delayed senescence. Therefore, the results of the present study demonstrate that overexpression of an Arabidopsis BR-inactivating enzyme can reduce the endogenous levels of BRs in creeping bentgrass resulting in BR-deficient phenotypes, indicating that the AtBAT1 gene from a dicot plant is also functional in the monocot crop.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0187378

  10 / 653 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29063407
[Au] Autor:Kasowska D; Gediga K; Spiak Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Botany and Plant Ecology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Grunwaldzki Square 24A, 50-363, Wroclaw, Poland. dorota.kasowska@upwr.edu.pl.
[Ti] Title:Heavy metal and nutrient uptake in plants colonizing post-flotation copper tailings.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;, 2017 Oct 23.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Copper ore mining and processing release hazardous post-flotation wastes that are difficult for remediation. The studied tailings were extremely rich in Cu (1800 mg kg ) and contaminated with Co and Mn, and contained very little available forms of P, Fe, and Zn. The plants growing in tailings were distinctly enriched in Cu, Cd, Co, Ni, and Pb, and the concentration of copper achived the critical toxicity level in shoots of Cerastium arvense and Polygonum aviculare. The redundancy analysis demonstrated significant relationship between the concentration of available forms of studied elements in substrate and the chemical composition of plant shoots. Results of the principal component analysis enabled to distinguish groups of plants which significantly differed in the pattern of element accumulation. The grass species Agrostis stolonifera and Calamagrostis epigejos growing in the tailings accumulated significantly lower amounts of Cu, but they also had the lowest levels of P, Fe, and Zn in comparison to dicotyledonous. A. stolonifera occurred to be the most suitable species for phytostabilization of the tailings with regard to its low shoot Cu content and more efficient acquisition of limiting nutrients in relation to C. epigejos. The amendments improving texture, phosphorus fertilization, and the introduction of native leguminous species were recommended for application in the phytoremediation process of the tailings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-017-0451-y


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