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[PMID]: 26084697
[Au] Autor:Yang M; Barak OF; Dujic Z; Madden D; Bhopale VM; Bhullar J; Thom SR
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; and....
[Ti] Title:Ascorbic acid supplementation diminishes microparticle elevations and neutrophil activation following SCUBA diving.
[So] Source:Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol;309(4):R338-44, 2015 Aug 15.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Predicated on evidence that diving-related microparticle generation is an oxidative stress response, this study investigated the role that oxygen plays in augmenting production of annexin V-positive microparticles associated with open-water SCUBA diving and whether elevations can be abrogated by ascorbic acid. Following a cross-over study design, 14 male subjects ingested placebo and 2-3 wk later ascorbic acid (2 g) daily for 6 days prior to performing either a 47-min dive to 18 m of sea water while breathing air (∼222 kPa N2/59 kPa O2) or breathing a mixture of 60% O2/balance N2 from a tight-fitting face mask at atmospheric pressure for 47 min (∼40 kPa N2/59 kPa O2). Within 30 min after the 18-m dive in the placebo group, neutrophil activation, and platelet-neutrophil interactions occurred, and the total number of microparticles, as well as subgroups bearing CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142 proteins or nitrotyrosine, increased approximately twofold. No significant elevations occurred among divers after ingesting ascorbic acid, nor were elevations identified in either group after breathing 60% O2. Ascorbic acid had no significant effect on post-dive intravascular bubble production quantified by transthoracic echocardiography. We conclude that high-pressure nitrogen plays a key role in neutrophil and microparticle-associated changes with diving and that responses can be abrogated by dietary ascorbic acid supplementation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1152/ajpregu.00155.2015

  2 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26268191
[Au] Autor:Sather AC; Lee HG; Colombe JR; Zhang A; Buchwald SL
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA....
[Ti] Title:Dosage delivery of sensitive reagents enables glove-box-free synthesis.
[So] Source:Nature;524(7564):208-11, 2015 Aug 13.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4687
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Contemporary organic chemists employ a broad range of catalytic and stoichiometric methods to construct molecules for applications in the material sciences, and as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and sensors. The utility of a synthetic method may be greatly reduced if it relies on a glove box to enable the use of air- and moisture-sensitive reagents or catalysts. Furthermore, many synthetic chemistry laboratories have numerous containers of partially used reagents that have been spoiled by exposure to the ambient atmosphere. This is exceptionally wasteful from both an environmental and a cost perspective. Here we report an encapsulation method for stabilizing and storing air- and moisture-sensitive compounds. We demonstrate this approach in three contexts, by describing single-use capsules that contain all of the reagents (catalysts, ligands, and bases) necessary for the glove-box-free palladium-catalysed carbon-fluorine, carbon-nitrogen, and carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. This strategy should reduce the number of error-prone, tedious and time-consuming weighing procedures required for such syntheses and should be applicable to a wide range of reagents, catalysts, and substrate combinations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/nature14654

  3 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26268358
[Au] Autor:Copete LS; Chanagá X; Barriuso J; López-Lucendo MF; Martínez MJ; Camarero S
[Ad] Address:Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC. Ramiro de Maeztu 9, Madrid, 28040, Spain. lscopete@unal.edu.co....
[Ti] Title:Identification and characterization of laccase-type multicopper oxidases involved in dye-decolorization by the fungus Leptosphaerulina sp.
[So] Source:BMC Biotechnol;15:74, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6750
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fungal laccases are multicopper oxidases (MCOs) with high biotechnological potential due to their capability to oxidize a wide range of aromatic contaminants using oxygen from the air. Albeit the numerous laccase-like genes described in ascomycete fungi, ascomycete laccases have been less thoroughly studied than white-rot basidiomycetous laccases. A variety of MCO genes has recently been discovered in plant pathogenic ascomycete fungi, however little is known about the presence and function of laccases in these fungi or their potential use as biocatalysts. We aim here to identify the laccase-type oxidoreductases that might be involved in the decolorization of dyes by Leptosphaerulina sp. and to characterize them as potential biotechnological tools. RESULTS: A Leptosphaerulina fungal strain, isolated from lignocellulosic material in Colombia, produces laccase as the main ligninolytic oxidoreductase activity during decolorization of synthetic organic dyes. Four laccase-type MCO genes were partially amplified from the genomic DNA using degenerate primers based on laccase-specific signature sequences. The phylogenetic analysis showed the clustering of Lac1, Lac4 and Lac3 with ascomycete laccases, whereas Lac2 grouped with fungal ferroxidases (together with other hypothetical laccases). Lac3, the main laccase produced by Leptosphaerulina sp. in dye decolorizing and laccase-induced cultures (according to the shotgun analysis of both secretomes) was purified and characterized in this study. It is a sensu-stricto laccase able to decolorize synthetic organic dyes with high efficiency particularly in the presence of natural mediator compounds. CONCLUSIONS: The searching for laccase-type MCOs in ascomycetous families where their presence is poorly known, might provide a source of biocatalysts with potential biotechnological interest and shed light on their role in the fungus. The information provided by the use of genomic and proteomic tools must be combined with the biochemical evaluation of the enzyme to prove its catalytic activity and applicability potential.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12896-015-0192-2

  4 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26195793
[Au] Autor:Schumacher J; Götzfried P; Scheel JD
[Ad] Address:Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technische Universität Ilmenau, D-98684 Ilmenau, Germany; joerg.schumacher@tu-ilmenau.de.
[Ti] Title:Enhanced enstrophy generation for turbulent convection in low-Prandtl-number fluids.
[So] Source:Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A;112(31):9530-5, 2015 Aug 4.
[Is] ISSN:1091-6490
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Turbulent convection is often present in liquids with a kinematic viscosity much smaller than the diffusivity of the temperature. Here we reveal why these convection flows obey a much stronger level of fluid turbulence than those in which kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity are the same; i.e., the Prandtl number [Formula: see text] is unity. We compare turbulent convection in air at [Formula: see text] and in liquid mercury at [Formula: see text]. In this comparison the Prandtl number at constant Grashof number [Formula: see text] is varied, rather than at constant Rayleigh number [Formula: see text] as usually done. Our simulations demonstrate that the turbulent Kolmogorov-like cascade is extended both at the large- and small-scale ends with decreasing [Formula: see text]. The kinetic energy injection into the flow takes place over the whole cascade range. In contrast to convection in air, the kinetic energy injection rate is particularly enhanced for liquid mercury for all scales larger than the characteristic width of thermal plumes. As a consequence, mean values and fluctuations of the local strain rates are increased, which in turn results in significantly enhanced enstrophy production by vortex stretching. The normalized distributions of enstrophy production in the bulk and the ratio of the principal strain rates are found to agree for both [Formula: see text]. Despite the different energy injection mechanisms, the principal strain rates also agree with those in homogeneous isotropic turbulence conducted at the same Reynolds numbers as for the convection flows. Our results have thus interesting implications for small-scale turbulence modeling of liquid metal convection in astrophysical and technological applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1073/pnas.1505111112

  5 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26230403
[Au] Autor:Barrett JR
[Ti] Title:How Good Is Good Enough? Cookstove Replacement Scenarios to Reach Indoor Air Goals.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;123(8):A216, 2015 Aug 1.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1289/ehp.123-A216

  6 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25839747
[Au] Autor:Wang M; Gehring U; Hoek G; Keuken M; Jonkers S; Beelen R; Eeftens M; Postma DS; Brunekreef B
[Ad] Address:Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Air Pollution and Lung Function in Dutch Children: A Comparison of Exposure Estimates and Associations Based on Land Use Regression and Dispersion Exposure Modeling Approaches.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;123(8):847-51, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge about the extent to which estimates of air pollution effects on health are affected by the choice for a specific exposure model. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the correlation between long-term air pollution exposure estimates using two commonly used exposure modeling techniques [dispersion and land use regression (LUR) models] and, in addition, to compare the estimates of the association between long-term exposure to air pollution and lung function in children using these exposure modeling techniques. METHODS: We used data of 1,058 participants of a Dutch birth cohort study with measured forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements at 8 years of age. For each child, annual average outdoor air pollution exposure [nitrogen dioxide (NO2), mass concentration of particulate matter with diameters ≤ 2.5 and ≤ 10 µm (PM2.5, PM10), and PM2.5 soot] was estimated for the current addresses of the participants by a dispersion and a LUR model. Associations between exposures to air pollution and lung function parameters were estimated using linear regression analysis with confounder adjustment. RESULTS: Correlations between LUR- and dispersion-modeled pollution concentrations were high for NO2, PM2.5, and PM2.5 soot (R = 0.86-0.90) but low for PM10 (R = 0.57). Associations with lung function were similar for air pollutant exposures estimated using LUR and dispersion modeling, except for associations of PM2.5 with FEV1 and FVC, which were stronger but less precise for exposures based on LUR compared with dispersion model. CONCLUSIONS: Predictions from LUR and dispersion models correlated very well for PM2.5, NO2, and PM2.5 soot but not for PM10. Health effect estimates did not depend on the type of model used to estimate exposure in a population of Dutch children. CITATION: Wang M, Gehring U, Hoek G, Keuken M, Jonkers S, Beelen R, Eeftens M, Postma DS, Brunekreef B. 2015. Air pollution and lung function in Dutch children: a comparison of exposure estimates and associations based on land use regression and dispersion exposure modeling approaches. Environ Health Perspect 123:847-851; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408541.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408541

  7 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25816219
[Au] Autor:Johnson MA; Chiang RA
[Ad] Address:Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, Berkeley, California, USA.
[Ti] Title:Quantitative Guidance for Stove Usage and Performance to Achieve Health and Environmental Targets.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;123(8):820-6, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Displacing the use of polluting and inefficient cookstoves in developing countries is necessary to achieve the potential health and environmental benefits sought through clean cooking solutions. Yet little quantitative context has been provided on how much displacement of traditional technologies is needed to achieve targets for household air pollutant concentrations or fuel savings. OBJECTIVES: This paper provides instructive guidance on the usage of cooking technologies required to achieve health and environmental improvements. METHODS: We evaluated different scenarios of displacement of traditional stoves with use of higher performing technologies. The air quality and fuel consumption impacts were estimated for these scenarios using a single-zone box model of indoor air quality and ratios of thermal efficiency. RESULTS: Stove performance and usage should be considered together, as lower performing stoves can result in similar or greater benefits than a higher performing stove if the lower performing stove has considerably higher displacement of the baseline stove. Based on the indoor air quality model, there are multiple performance-usage scenarios for achieving modest indoor air quality improvements. To meet World Health Organization guidance levels, however, three-stone fire and basic charcoal stove usage must be nearly eliminated to achieve the particulate matter target (< 1-3 hr/week), and substantially limited to meet the carbon monoxide guideline (< 7-9 hr/week). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate health gains may be achieved with various performance-usage scenarios. The greatest benefits are estimated to be achieved by near-complete displacement of traditional stoves with clean technologies, emphasizing the need to shift in the long term to near exclusive use of clean fuels and stoves. The performance-usage scenarios are also provided as a tool to guide technology selection and prioritize behavior change opportunities to maximize impact. CITATION: Johnson MA, Chiang RA. 2015. Quantitative guidance for stove usage and performance to achieve health and environmental targets. Environ Health Perspect 123:820-826; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408681.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408681

  8 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25816123
[Au] Autor:Saenen ND; Plusquin M; Bijnens E; Janssen BG; Gyselaers W; Cox B; Fierens F; Molenberghs G; Penders J; Vrijens K; De Boever P; Nawrot TS
[Ad] Address:Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Limburg, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:In Utero Fine Particle Air Pollution and Placental Expression of Genes in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Pathway: An ENVIRONAGE Birth Cohort Study.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;123(8):834-40, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Developmental processes in the placenta and the fetal brain are shaped by the same biological signals. Recent evidence suggests that adaptive responses of the placenta to the maternal environment may influence central nervous system development. OBJECTIVES: We studied the association between in utero exposure to fine particle air pollution with a diameter ≤ 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and placental expression of genes implicated in neural development. METHODS: Expression of 10 target genes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway were quantified in placental tissue of 90 mother-infant pairs from the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Trimester-specific PM2.5 exposure levels were estimated for each mother's home address using a spatiotemporal model. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the association between the target genes and PM2.5 exposure measured in different time windows of pregnancy. RESULTS: A 5-µg/m3 increase in residential PM2.5 exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with a 15.9% decrease [95% confidence interval (CI): -28.7, -3.2%, p = 0.015] in expression of placental BDNF at birth. The corresponding estimate for synapsin 1 (SYN1) was a 24.3% decrease (95% CI: -42.8, -5.8%, p = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS: Placental expression of BDNF and SYN1, two genes implicated in normal neurodevelopmental trajectories, decreased with increasing in utero exposure to PM2.5. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings and evaluate the potential relevance of associations between PM2.5 and placental expression of BDNF and SYN1 on neurodevelopment. We provide the first molecular epidemiological evidence concerning associations between in utero fine particle air pollution exposure and the expression of genes that may influence neurodevelopmental processes. CITATION: Saenen ND, Plusquin M, Bijnens E, Janssen BG, Gyselaers W, Cox B, Fierens F, Molenberghs G, Penders J, Vrijens K, De Boever P, Nawrot TS. 2015. In utero fine particle air pollution and placental expression of genes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathway: an ENVIRONAGE Birth Cohort Study. Environ Health Perspect 123:834-840; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408549.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408549

  9 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25816055
[Au] Autor:Lanki T; Hampel R; Tiittanen P; Andrich S; Beelen R; Brunekreef B; Dratva J; De Faire U; Fuks KB; Hoffmann B; Imboden M; Jousilahti P; Koenig W; Mahabadi AA; Künzli N; Pedersen NL; Penell J; Pershagen G; Probst-Hensch NM; Schaffner E; Schindler C; Sugiri D; Swart WJ; Tsai MY; Turunen AW; Weinmayr G; Wolf K; Yli-Tuomi T; Peters A
[Ad] Address:Department of Health Protection, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Air Pollution from Road Traffic and Systemic Inflammation in Adults: A Cross-Sectional Analysis in the European ESCAPE Project.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;123(8):785-91, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Exposure to particulate matter air pollution (PM) has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. OBJECTIVES: In this study we evaluated whether annual exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with systemic inflammation, which is hypothesized to be an intermediate step to cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Six cohorts of adults from Central and Northern Europe were used in this cross-sectional study as part of the larger ESCAPE project (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects). Data on levels of blood markers for systemic inflammation-high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen-were available for 22,561 and 17,428 persons, respectively. Land use regression models were used to estimate cohort participants' long-term exposure to various size fractions of PM, soot, and nitrogen oxides (NOx). In addition, traffic intensity on the closest street and traffic load within 100 m from home were used as indicators of traffic air pollution exposure. RESULTS: Particulate air pollution was not associated with systemic inflammation. However, cohort participants living on a busy (> 10,000 vehicles/day) road had elevated CRP values (10.2%; 95% CI: 2.4, 18.8%, compared with persons living on a quiet residential street with < 1,000 vehicles/day). Annual NOx concentration was also positively associated with levels of CRP (3.2%; 95% CI: 0.3, 6.1 per 20 µg/m3), but the effect estimate was more sensitive to model adjustments. For fibrinogen, no consistent associations were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Living close to busy traffic was associated with increased CRP concentrations, a known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, it remains unclear which specific air pollutants are responsible for the association. CITATION: Lanki T, Hampel R, Tiittanen P, Andrich S, Beelen R, Brunekreef B, Dratva J, De Faire U, Fuks KB, Hoffmann B, Imboden M, Jousilahti P, Koenig W, Mahabadi AA, Künzli N, Pedersen NL, Penell J, Pershagen G, Probst-Hensch NM, Schaffner E, Schindler C, Sugiri D, Swart WJ, Tsai MY, Turunen AW, Weinmayr G, Wolf K, Yli-Tuomi T, Peters A. 2015. Air pollution from road traffic and systemic inflammation in adults: a cross-sectional analysis in the European ESCAPE project. Environ Health Perspect 123:785-791; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408224.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1289/ehp.1408224

  10 / 274218 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25794410
[Au] Autor:Qiao Z; Guo Y; Yu W; Tong S
[Ad] Address:School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Assessment of Short- and Long-Term Mortality Displacement in Heat-Related Deaths in Brisbane, Australia, 1996-2004.
[So] Source:Environ Health Perspect;123(8):766-72, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1552-9924
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mortality displacement (or "harvesting") has been identified as a key issue in the assessment of the temperature-mortality relationship. However, only a few studies have addressed the "harvesting" issue and findings have not been consistent. OBJECTIVES: We examined the potential impact of both short- and long-term harvesting effects on heat-related deaths in Brisbane, Australia. METHODS: We collected data on daily counts of deaths (nonaccidental, cardiovascular, and respiratory), weather, and air pollution in Brisbane from 1 January 1996 to 30 November 2004. We estimated heat-related deaths, identified potential short-term mortality displacement, and assessed how and to what extent the impact of summer temperature on mortality was modified by mortality in the previous winter using a Poisson time-series regression combined with distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM). RESULTS: There were significant associations between temperature and each mortality outcome in summer. We found evidence of short-term mortality displacement for respiratory mortality, and evidence of longer-term mortality displacement for nonaccidental and cardiovascular mortality when the preceding winter's mortality was low. The estimated heat effect on mortality was generally stronger when the preceding winter mortality level was low. For example, we estimated a 22% increase in nonaccidental mortality (95% CI: 14, 30) with a 1°C increase in mean temperature above a 28°C threshold in summers that followed a winter with low mortality, compared with 12% (95% CI: 7, 17) following a winter with high mortality. The short- and long-term mortality displacement appeared to jointly influence the assessment of heat-related deaths. CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence of both short- and long-term harvesting effects on heat-related mortality in Brisbane, Australia. Our finding may clarify temperature-related health risks and inform effective public health interventions to manage the health impacts of climate change. CITATION: Qiao Z, Guo Y, Yu W, Tong S. 2015. Assessment of short- and long-term mortality displacement in heat-related deaths in Brisbane, Australia, 1996-2004. Environ Health Perspect 123:766-772; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307606.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1508
[Cu] Class update date: 150815
[Lr] Last revision date:150815
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1289/ehp.1307606


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