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[PMID]: 24750266
[Au] Autor:Gore RB; Boyle RJ; Gore C; Custovic A; Hanna H; Svensson P; Warner JO
[Ad] Address:Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University Hospitals of South Manchester, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; East and North Herts NHS Trust, Stevenage, UK.
[Ti] Title:Effect of a novel temperature-controlled laminar airflow device on personal breathing zone aeroallergen exposure.
[So] Source:Indoor Air;25(1):36-44, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0668
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Temperature-controlled laminar airflow improves symptoms in atopic asthmatics, but its effects on personal allergen exposure are unknown. We aimed to evaluate its effects on personal cat allergen and particulate exposures in a simulated bedroom environment. Five healthy volunteers lay under an active and an inactive temperature-controlled laminar airflow device for 175 min, in a simulated bedroom containing bedding from a cat owner. Total airborne particles (≥0.5 - ≥10 µm diameter) were quantified with a laser particle counter. Airborne allergen was sampled with Institute of Occupational Medicine filters. Inhaled exposure was sampled with nasal air samplers. Allergen-containing particles were quantified by immunoassay. Treatment reduced total airborne particles (>0.5 µm diameter) by >99% (P < 0.001) and reduced airborne allergen concentration within the breathing zone (ratio of median counts = 30, P = 0.043). Treatment reduced inhaled allergen (ratio of median counts = 7, P = 0.043). Treatment was not associated with a change in airborne allergen concentration outside of the breathing zone (P = 0.160). Temperature-controlled laminar airflow treatment of individuals in an allergen-rich experimental environment results in significant reductions in breathing zone allergenic and non-allergenic particle exposure, and in inhaled cat allergen exposure. These findings may explain the clinical benefits of temperature-controlled laminar airflow.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/ina.12122

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[PMID]: 24750252
[Au] Autor:Arku RE; Adamkiewicz G; Vallarino J; Spengler JD; Levy DE
[Ad] Address:Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Seasonal variability in environmental tobacco smoke exposure in public housing developments.
[So] Source:Indoor Air;25(1):13-20, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0668
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The risk of tobacco smoking and second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure combined are the leading contributors to disease burden in high-income countries. Recent studies and policies are focusing on reducing exposure to SHS in multiunit housing (MUH), especially public housing. We examined seasonal patterns of SHS levels within indoor common areas located on Boston Housing Authority (BHA) properties. We measured weekly integrated and continuous fine particulate matter (PM2.5 ) and passive airborne nicotine in six buildings of varying building and occupant characteristics in summer 2012 and winter 2013. The average weekly indoor PM2.5 concentration across all six developments was 9.2 µg/m(3) , higher during winter monitoring period (10.3 µg/m(3) ) compared with summer (8.0 µg/m(3) ). Airborne nicotine concentrations ranged from no detection to about 5000 ng/m(3) (mean 311 ng/m(3) ). Nicotine levels were significantly higher in the winter compared with summer (620 vs. 85 ng/m(3) ; 95% CI: 72-998). Smoking-related exposures within Boston public housing vary by season, building types, and resident smoking policy. Our results represent exposure disparities that may contribute to health disparities in low-income communities and highlight the potential importance of efforts to mitigate SHS exposures during winter when outdoor-indoor exchange rates are low and smokers may tend to stay indoors. Our findings support the use of smoke-free policy as an effective tool to eliminate SHS exposure and protect non-smokers, especially residents of MUH.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/ina.12121

  3 / 265286 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25589837
[Au] Autor:Uh ST; Koo SM; Jang AS; Park SW; Choi JS; Kim YH; Park CS
[Ad] Address:Division of Allergy and Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Proteomic differences with and without ozone-exposure in a smoking-induced emphysema lung model.
[So] Source:Korean J Intern Med;30(1):62-72, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2005-6648
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: Acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be related to air pollution, of which ozone is an important constituent. In this study, we investigated the protein profiles associated with ozone-induced exacerbations in a smoking-induced emphysema model. METHODS: Mice were divided into the following groups: group I, no smoking and no ozone (NS + NO); group II, no smoking and ozone (NS + O); group III, smoking and no ozone (S + NO); and group IV, smoking and ozone (S + O). Bronchoalveolar lavage, the mean linear intercept (MLI) on hematoxylin and eosin staining, nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and Western blotting analyses were performed. RESULTS: The MLIs of groups III (S + NO) and IV (S + O) (45 ± 2 and 44 ± 3 µm, respectively) were significantly higher than those of groups I (NS + NO) and II (NS + O) (26 ± 2 and 23 ± 2 µm, respectively; p < 0.05). Fourteen spots that showed significantly different intensities on image analyses of two-dimensional (2D) protein electrophoresis in group I (NS + NO) were identified by LC-MS/MS. The levels of six proteins were higher in group IV (S + O). The levels of vimentin, lactate dehydrogenase A, and triose phosphate isomerase were decreased by both smoking and ozone treatment in Western blotting and proteomic analyses. In contrast, TBC1 domain family 5 (TBC1D5) and lamin A were increased by both smoking and ozone treatment. CONCLUSIONS: TBC1D5 could be a biomarker of ozone-induced lung injury in emphysema.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3904/kjim.2015.30.1.62

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[PMID]: 25589836
[Au] Autor:Hwang KE; Song HY; Jung JW; Oh SJ; Yoon KH; Park DS; Jeong ET; Kim HR
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Wonkwang Medical Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Pleural fluid characteristics of pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis masquerading as pleural tuberculosis.
[So] Source:Korean J Intern Med;30(1):56-61, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2005-6648
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND/AIMS: Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis produces no specific symptoms or radiologic findings, allowing for the possibility of misdiagnosis. We evaluated the specific clinical and pleural fluid features of pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis masquerading as pleural tuberculosis. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic characteristics of 20 patients diagnosed with pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis between 2001 and 2011. RESULTS: In total, 17 patients presented with respiratory symptoms, including dyspnea (30%), hemoptysis (20%), cough (20%), and pleuritic chest pain (15%). Chest radiographs revealed intrapulmonary parenchymal lesions, including air-space consolidation (30%), nodular opacities (20%), cystic lesions (15%), ground-glass opacities (10%), and pneumothorax (5%). A pleural f luid examination revealed eosinophilia, low glucose levels, and high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in 87%, 76%, and 88% of the patients, respectively. These traits helped to distinguish pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis from other pleural diseases such as parapneumonic effusion, malignancy, and pleural tuberculosis. CONCLUSIONS: Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis is often initially misdiagnosed as other pleural diseases. Therefore, it is important to establish the correct diagnosis. In patients with unexplained pleural effusion living in paragonimiasis-endemic areas, pleural fluid obtained by thoracentesis should be examined to distinguish pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis. When marked eosinophilia, high LDH levels, and low glucose levels are identified in pleural fluid, physicians could consider a diagnosis of pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3904/kjim.2015.30.1.56

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[PMID]: 25589969
[Au] Autor:Feng M; Shen Y; Wang H; Tan L; Mao X; Liu Y; Wang Q
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Thoracic Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China ; 2 Department of Surgery, Danyang People's Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Danyang 212300, China....
[Ti] Title:Uniportal video assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy: primary experience from an Eastern center.
[So] Source:J Thorac Dis;6(12):1751-6, 2014 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2072-1439
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy is an emerging technique for the surgical resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Besides its wide debates on safety and efficacy throughout the world, there were few report on uniportal VATS from the Eastern countries. In this article, we summarized our primary experience on uniportal VATS lobectomy in an Eastern center. METHODS: From October 2013 till February 2014, 54 consecutive uniportal VATS lobectomy were performed in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University. Patients' clinical features and operative details were recorded. Post-operatively, the morbidity and mortality were recorded to analyze the safety and efficacy of uniportal VATS lobectomy for NSCLCs. RESULTS: Among the 54 planned uniportal VATS lobectomy, there was one conversion to mini-thoracotomy due to lymph node sticking. Extra ports were required in two patients. The uniportal VATS lobectomy was achieved in 51 out of 54 patients (94.4%). The average operation duration was 122.2±37.5 min (90-160 min). The average volume of estimated blood loss during the operation was 88.8±47.1 mL (50-200 mL). The mean chest tube duration and hospital stay were 3.2±1.9 days and 4.6±2.0 days, respectively. There was no postoperative mortality in this study. Two patients suffered from prolonged air leakage (5 and 7 days), and one atrial fibrillation was observed in this cohort. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our primary experience, uniportal VATS lobectomy is a safe and effective procedure for the surgical resection of NSCLCs. The surgical refinements and instrumental improvements would facilitate the technique. Further studies based on larger population are required to determine its benefits towards patients with NSCLCs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150115
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2014.11.20

  6 / 265286 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25233913
[Au] Autor:Simon-Delso N; Amaral-Rogers V; Belzunces LP; Bonmatin JM; Chagnon M; Downs C; Furlan L; Gibbons DW; Giorio C; Girolami V; Goulson D; Kreutzweiser DP; Krupke CH; Liess M; Long E; McField M; Mineau P; Mitchell EA; Morrissey CA; Noome DA; Pisa L; Settele J; Stark JD; Tapparo A; Van Dyck H; Van Praagh J; Van der Sluijs JP; Whitehorn PR; Wiemers M
[Ad] Address:Environmental Sciences, Copernicus Institute, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands, noa.simondelso@student.uclouvain.be.
[Ti] Title:Systemic insecticides (neonicotinoids and fipronil): trends, uses, mode of action and metabolites.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;22(1):5-34, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since their discovery in the late 1980s, neonicotinoid pesticides have become the most widely used class of insecticides worldwide, with large-scale applications ranging from plant protection (crops, vegetables, fruits), veterinary products, and biocides to invertebrate pest control in fish farming. In this review, we address the phenyl-pyrazole fipronil together with neonicotinoids because of similarities in their toxicity, physicochemical profiles, and presence in the environment. Neonicotinoids and fipronil currently account for approximately one third of the world insecticide market; the annual world production of the archetype neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, was estimated to be ca. 20,000 tonnes active substance in 2010. There were several reasons for the initial success of neonicotinoids and fipronil: (1) there was no known pesticide resistance in target pests, mainly because of their recent development, (2) their physicochemical properties included many advantages over previous generations of insecticides (i.e., organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, etc.), and (3) they shared an assumed reduced operator and consumer risk. Due to their systemic nature, they are taken up by the roots or leaves and translocated to all parts of the plant, which, in turn, makes them effectively toxic to herbivorous insects. The toxicity persists for a variable period of time-depending on the plant, its growth stage, and the amount of pesticide applied. A wide variety of applications are available, including the most common prophylactic non-Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) application by seed coating. As a result of their extensive use and physicochemical properties, these substances can be found in all environmental compartments including soil, water, and air. Neonicotinoids and fipronil operate by disrupting neural transmission in the central nervous system of invertebrates. Neonicotinoids mimic the action of neurotransmitters, while fipronil inhibits neuronal receptors. In doing so, they continuously stimulate neurons leading ultimately to death of target invertebrates. Like virtually all insecticides, they can also have lethal and sublethal impacts on non-target organisms, including insect predators and vertebrates. Furthermore, a range of synergistic effects with other stressors have been documented. Here, we review extensively their metabolic pathways, showing how they form both compound-specific and common metabolites which can themselves be toxic. These may result in prolonged toxicity. Considering their wide commercial expansion, mode of action, the systemic properties in plants, persistence and environmental fate, coupled with limited information about the toxicity profiles of these compounds and their metabolites, neonicotinoids and fipronil may entail significant risks to the environment. A global evaluation of the potential collateral effects of their use is therefore timely. The present paper and subsequent chapters in this review of the global literature explore these risks and show a growing body of evidence that persistent, low concentrations of these insecticides pose serious risks of undesirable environmental impacts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-014-3470-y

  7 / 265286 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25035052
[Au] Autor:Chagnon M; Kreutzweiser D; Mitchell EA; Morrissey CA; Noome DA; Van der Sluijs JP
[Ad] Address:Département des sciences biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Case Postale 8888, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec, H3C 3P8, Canada, chagnon.madeleine@uqam.ca.
[Ti] Title:Risks of large-scale use of systemic insecticides to ecosystem functioning and services.
[So] Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int;22(1):119-34, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1614-7499
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Large-scale use of the persistent and potent neonicotinoid and fipronil insecticides has raised concerns about risks to ecosystem functions provided by a wide range of species and environments affected by these insecticides. The concept of ecosystem services is widely used in decision making in the context of valuing the service potentials, benefits, and use values that well-functioning ecosystems provide to humans and the biosphere and, as an endpoint (value to be protected), in ecological risk assessment of chemicals. Neonicotinoid insecticides are frequently detected in soil and water and are also found in air, as dust particles during sowing of crops and aerosols during spraying. These environmental media provide essential resources to support biodiversity, but are known to be threatened by long-term or repeated contamination by neonicotinoids and fipronil. We review the state of knowledge regarding the potential impacts of these insecticides on ecosystem functioning and services provided by terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems including soil and freshwater functions, fisheries, biological pest control, and pollination services. Empirical studies examining the specific impacts of neonicotinoids and fipronil to ecosystem services have focused largely on the negative impacts to beneficial insect species (honeybees) and the impact on pollination service of food crops. However, here we document broader evidence of the effects on ecosystem functions regulating soil and water quality, pest control, pollination, ecosystem resilience, and community diversity. In particular, microbes, invertebrates, and fish play critical roles as decomposers, pollinators, consumers, and predators, which collectively maintain healthy communities and ecosystem integrity. Several examples in this review demonstrate evidence of the negative impacts of systemic insecticides on decomposition, nutrient cycling, soil respiration, and invertebrate populations valued by humans. Invertebrates, particularly earthworms that are important for soil processes, wild and domestic insect pollinators which are important for plant and crop production, and several freshwater taxa which are involved in aquatic nutrient cycling, were all found to be highly susceptible to lethal and sublethal effects of neonicotinoids and/or fipronil at environmentally relevant concentrations. By contrast, most microbes and fish do not appear to be as sensitive under normal exposure scenarios, though the effects on fish may be important in certain realms such as combined fish-rice farming systems and through food chain effects. We highlight the economic and cultural concerns around agriculture and aquaculture production and the role these insecticides may have in threatening food security. Overall, we recommend improved sustainable agricultural practices that restrict systemic insecticide use to maintain and support several ecosystem services that humans fundamentally depend on.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150117
[Lr] Last revision date:150117
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11356-014-3277-x

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[PMID]: 24995590
[Au] Autor:Swick D; Jaques A; Walker JC; Estreicher H
[Ad] Address:American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, United States. Electronic address: swickd@api.org....
[Ti] Title:Gasoline risk management: a compendium of regulations, standards, and industry practices.
[So] Source:Regul Toxicol Pharmacol;70(2 Suppl):S80-92, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0295
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper is part of a special series of publications regarding gasoline toxicology testing and gasoline risk management; this article covers regulations, standards, and industry practices concerning gasoline risk management. Gasoline is one of the highest volume liquid fuel products produced globally. In the U.S., gasoline production in 2013 was the highest on record (API, 2013). Regulations such as those pursuant to the Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) and many others provide the U.S. federal government with extensive authority to regulate gasoline composition, manufacture, storage, transportation and distribution practices, worker and consumer exposure, product labeling, and emissions from engines and other sources designed to operate on this fuel. The entire gasoline lifecycle-from manufacture, through distribution, to end-use-is subject to detailed, complex, and overlapping regulatory schemes intended to protect human health, welfare, and the environment. In addition to these legal requirements, industry has implemented a broad array of voluntary standards and best management practices to ensure that risks from gasoline manufacturing, distribution, and use are minimized.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 265286 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24956589
[Au] Autor:Swick D; Jaques A; Walker JC; Estreicher H
[Ad] Address:American Petroleum Institute, 1220 L Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, United States. Electronic address: swickd@api.org....
[Ti] Title:Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.
[So] Source:Regul Toxicol Pharmacol;70(2 Suppl):S3-S12, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0295
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 265286 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24852493
[Au] Autor:Henley M; Letinski DJ; Carr J; Caro ML; Daughtrey W; White R
[Ad] Address:Chevron Energy Technology Company, 100 Chevron Way, Richmond, CA 94801-2016, USA. Electronic address: mikeandroxann@comcast.net....
[Ti] Title:Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.
[So] Source:Regul Toxicol Pharmacol;70(2 Suppl):S13-7, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0295
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1412
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process


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