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[PMID]: 25192998
[Au] Autor:DePas WH; Syed AK; Sifuentes M; Lee JS; Warshaw D; Saggar V; Csankovszki G; Boles BR; Chapman MR
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA....
[Ti] Title:Biofilm Formation Protects Escherichia coli against Killing by Caenorhabditis elegans and Myxococcus xanthus.
[So] Source:Appl Environ Microbiol;80(22):7079-87, 2014 Nov 15.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5336
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Enteric bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, are exposed to a variety of stresses in the nonhost environment. The development of biofilms provides E. coli with resistance to environmental insults, such as desiccation and bleach. We found that biofilm formation, specifically production of the matrix components curli and cellulose, protected E. coli against killing by the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the predatory bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Additionally, matrix-encased bacteria at the air-biofilm interface exhibited ∼40-fold-increased survival after C. elegans and M. xanthus killing compared to the non-matrix-encased cells that populate the interior of the biofilm. To determine if nonhost Enterobacteriaceae reservoirs supported biofilm formation, we grew E. coli on media composed of pig dung or commonly contaminated foods, such as beef, chicken, and spinach. Each of these medium types provided a nutritional environment that supported matrix production and biofilm formation. Altogether, we showed that common, nonhost reservoirs of E. coli supported the formation of biofilms that subsequently protected E. coli against predation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1128/AEM.02464-14

  2 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320531
[Au] Autor:Park G; Lee SC; Choi BJ; Kim SJ
[Ad] Address:Geon Park, Department of Radiology, Daejeon St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon 301-723, South Korea....
[Ti] Title:Stratified computed tomography findings improve diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis.
[So] Source:World J Gastroenterol;20(38):13942-9, 2014 Oct 14.
[Is] ISSN:2219-2840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, but without confirmative computed tomography (CT) findings. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database of 224 patients who had been operated on for the suspicion of appendicitis, but whose CT findings were negative or equivocal for appendicitis. The patient population was divided into two groups: a pathologically proven appendicitis group (n = 177) and a non-appendicitis group (n = 47). The CT images of these patients were re-evaluated according to the characteristic CT features as described in the literature. The re-evaluations and baseline characteristics of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: The two groups showed significant differences with respect to appendiceal diameter, and the presence of periappendiceal fat stranding and intraluminal air in the appendix. A larger proportion of patients in the appendicitis group showed distended appendices larger than 6.0 mm (66.3% vs 37.0%; P < 0.001), periappendiceal fat stranding (34.1% vs 8.9%; P = 0.001), and the absence of intraluminal air (67.6% vs 48.9%; P = 0.024) compared to the non-appendicitis group. Furthermore, the presence of two or more of these factors increased the odds ratio to 6.8 times higher than baseline (95%CI: 3.013-15.454; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Appendiceal diameter and wall thickening, fat stranding, and absence of intraluminal air can be used to increased diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis with equivocal CT findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3748/wjg.v20.i38.13942

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[PMID]: 25109345
[Au] Autor:Wendlandt AE; Stahl SS
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison , 1101 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, United States.
[Ti] Title:Modular o-quinone catalyst system for dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines under ambient conditions.
[So] Source:J Am Chem Soc;136(34):11910-3, 2014 Aug 27.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5126
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Quinolines are common pharmacophores present in numerous FDA-approved pharmaceuticals and other bioactive compounds. Here, we report the design and development of new o-quinone-based catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines to afford quinolines. Use of a Co(salophen) cocatalyst allows the reaction to proceed efficiently with ambient air at room temperature. The utility of the catalytic method is demonstrated in the preparation of a number of medicinally relevant quinolines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1021/ja506546w

  4 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320402
[Au] Autor:Baddoo H; Djagbletey R; Owoo C
[Ad] Address:Department of Anaesthesia, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Korle-Bu, Accra.
[Ti] Title:A simple tissue model for practicing ultrasound guided vascular cannulation.
[So] Source:Ghana Med J;48(1):47-9, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9560
[Cp] Country of publication:Ghana
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The use of ultrasound in anaesthetic practice continues to be more established and the use of ultrasound guidance in establishing vascular access is recommended by various groups. We have developed a tissue model for the practice and skills development in ultrasound vascular access. METHOD: The tissue model consist of a piece of "pork belly", a longitudinal shaped balloon inserted between two muscle layers at a chosen depth of the tissue model (mimics a blood vessel), a bag of intravenous fluid (e.g. Ringer's Lactate) together with a giving set and a short piece of extension tubing connected to a three-way tap used to expel air from the system. One end of the balloon is tied to the giving set with the intravenous fluid. The other end is tied to the short tubing with the three-way tap. RESULTS: Ultrasound images of the fluid filled balloon mimic a blood vessel. It is possible under ultrasound guidance to puncture the balloon several times (>10times) and still be able to distend the balloon with fluid. INTERPRETATION: Ultrasound guided techniques require practice to improve hand-eye coordination. The "pork belly" tissue model allows multiple needle puncture without losing its functional integrity. CONCLUSION: We believe the "pork belly" tissue model adds to the range of models that can be used to practice ultrasound guided vascular access. The components required for this model are readily available locally and affordable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 25126877
[Au] Autor:Schwingshackl A; Teng B; Makena P; Ghosh M; Sinclair SE; Luellen C; Balasz L; Rovnaghi C; Bryan RM; Lloyd EE; Fitzpatrick E; Saravia JS; Cormier SA; Waters CM
[Ad] Address:1Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN. 2Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN. 3Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN. 4Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN. 5Department of Anesthesiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.
[Ti] Title:Deficiency of the Two-Pore-Domain Potassium Channel TREK-1 Promotes Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury.
[So] Source:Crit Care Med;42(11):e692-701, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0293
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: We previously reported the expression of the two-pore-domain K channel TREK-1 in lung epithelial cells and proposed a role for this channel in the regulation of alveolar epithelial cytokine secretion. In this study, we focused on investigating the role of TREK-1 in vivo in the development of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. DESIGN: Laboratory animal experiments. SETTING: University research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Wild-type and TREK-1-deficient mice. INTERVENTIONS: Mice were anesthetized and exposed to 1) room air, no mechanical ventilation, 2) 95% hyperoxia for 24 hours, and 3) 95% hyperoxia for 24 hours followed by mechanical ventilation for 4 hours. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Hyperoxia exposure accentuated lung injury in TREK-1-deficient mice but not controls, resulting in increase in lung injury scores, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell numbers, and cellular apoptosis and a decrease in quasi-static lung compliance. Exposure to a combination of hyperoxia and injurious mechanical ventilation resulted in further morphological lung damage and increased lung injury scores and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell numbers in control but not TREK-1-deficient mice. At baseline and after hyperoxia exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage cytokine levels were unchanged in TREK-1-deficient mice compared with controls. Exposure to hyperoxia and mechanical ventilation resulted in an increase in bronchoalveolar lavage interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in both mouse types, but the increase in interleukin-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels was less prominent in TREK-1-deficient mice than in controls. Lung tissue macrophage inflammatory protein-2, keratinocyte-derived cytokine, and interleukin-1ß gene expression was not altered by hyperoxia in TREK-1-deficient mice compared with controls. Furthermore, we show for the first time TREK-1 expression on alveolar macrophages and unimpaired tumor necrosis factor-α secretion from TREK-1-deficient macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: TREK-1 deficiency resulted in increased sensitivity of lungs to hyperoxia, but this effect is less prominent if overwhelming injury is induced by the combination of hyperoxia and injurious mechanical ventilation. TREK-1 may constitute a new potential target for the development of novel treatment strategies against hyperoxia-induced lung injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/CCM.0000000000000603

  6 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320389
[Au] Autor:Barletta M; Almondia D; Williams J; Crochik S; Hofmeister E
[Ad] Address:Department of Large Animal Medicine (Barletta), Department of Veterinary Biosciences & Diagnostic Imaging (Almondia, Williams, Crochik), Department of Small Animal Medicine & Surgery (Hofmeister), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA....
[Ti] Title:Radiographic evaluation of positional atelectasis in sedated dogs breathing room air versus 100% oxygen.
[So] Source:Can Vet J;55(10):985-91, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0008-5286
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study documents the degree of positional atelectasis in sedated dogs receiving 100% oxygen (O2) versus room air. Initial lateral recumbency was determined by an orthopedic study and initial treatment (O2 or room air) was randomized. Each dog was maintained in lateral recumbency for 15 min, at which time ventrodorsal (VD) and opposite lateral thoracic radiographs were obtained. Each dog was then maintained in the opposite lateral recumbency and received the other treatment for 15 min, followed by a VD and opposite lateral radiograph. Radiographs were scored for severity of pulmonary pattern and mediastinal shift by 3 radiologists. Dogs breathing O2 had significantly higher scores than dogs breathing room air. If radiographically detectable dependent atelectasis is present, repeat thoracic images following manual positive ventilation and/or position change to the opposite lateral recumbency should be made to rule out the effect of O2 positional atelectasis and avoid misdiagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25320562
[Au] Autor:Machado HS; Nunes CS; Sá P; Couceiro A; da Silva AM; Aguas A
[Ad] Address:Serviço de Anestesiologia, Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Largo Abel Salazar, Porto, 4099-001 Portugal....
[Ti] Title:Increased lung inflammation with oxygen supplementation in tracheotomized spontaneously breathing rabbits: an experimental prospective randomized study.
[So] Source:BMC Anesthesiol;14:86, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2253
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation is a well-known trigger for lung inflammation. Research focuses on tidal volume reduction to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury. Mechanical ventilation is usually applied with higher than physiological oxygen fractions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the after effect of oxygen supplementation during a spontaneous ventilation set up, in order to avoid the inflammatory response linked to mechanical ventilation. METHODS: A prospective randomised study using New Zealand rabbits in a university research laboratory was carried out. Rabbits (n = 20) were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 5 each group). Groups 1 and 2 were submitted to 0.5 L/min oxygen supplementation, for 20 or 75 minutes, respectively; groups 3 and 4 were left at room air for 20 or 75 minutes. Ketamine/xylazine was administered for induction and maintenance of anaesthesia. Lungs were obtained for histological examination in light microscopy. RESULTS: All animals survived the complete experiment. Procedure duration did not influence the degree of inflammatory response. The hyperoxic environment was confirmed by blood gas analyses in animals that were subjected to oxygen supplementation, and was accompanied with lower mean respiratory rates. The non-oxygen supplemented group had lower mean oxygen arterial partial pressures and higher mean respiratory rates during the procedure. All animals showed some inflammatory lung response. However, rabbits submitted to oxygen supplementation showed significant more lung inflammation (Odds ratio = 16), characterized by more infiltrates and with higher cell counts; the acute inflammatory response cells was mainly constituted by eosinophils and neutrophils, with a relative proportion of 80 to 20% respectively. This cellular observation in lung tissue did not correlate with a similar increase in peripheral blood analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Oxygen supplementation in spontaneous breathing is associated with an increased inflammatory response when compared to breathing normal room air. This inflammatory response was mainly constituted with polymorphonuclear cells (eosinophils and neutrophils). As confirmed in all animals by peripheral blood analyses, the eosinophilic inflammatory response was a local organ event.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/1471-2253-14-86

  8 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25313713
[Au] Autor:Bao X; Wen X; Sun X; Zhao F; Wang Y
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China....
[Ti] Title:Interannual variation in carbon sequestration depends mainly on the carbon uptake period in two croplands on the north china plain.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(10):e110021, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Interannual variation in plant phenology can lead to major modifications in the interannual variation of net ecosystem production (NEP) and net biome production (NBP) as a result of recent climate change in croplands. Continuous measurements of carbon flux using the eddy covariance technique were conducted in two winter wheat and summer maize double-cropped croplands during 2003-2012 in Yucheng and during 2007-2012 in Luancheng on the North China Plain. Our results showed that the difference between the NEP and the NBP, i.e., the crop economic yield, was conservative even though the NEP and the NBP for both sites exhibited marked fluctuations during the years of observation. A significant and positive relationship was found between the annual carbon uptake period (CUP) and the NEP as well as the NBP. The NEP and the NBP would increase by 14.8±5.2 and 14.7±6.6 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively, if one CUP-day was extended. A positive relationship also existed between the CUP and the NEP as well as the NBP for winter wheat and summer maize, respectively. The annual air temperature, through its negative effect on the start date of the CUP, determined the length of the CUP. The spring temperature was the main indirect factor controlling the annual carbon sequestration when a one-season crop (winter wheat) was considered. Thus, global warming can be expected to extend the length of the CUP and thus increase carbon sequestration in croplands.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0110021

  9 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25313661
[Au] Autor:Pülmanns N; Diele K; Mehlig U; Nordhaus I
[Ad] Address:Department of Ecology, Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Ecology (ZMT), Bremen, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Burrows of the Semi-Terrestrial Crab Ucides cordatus Enhance CO2 Release in a North Brazilian Mangrove Forest.
[So] Source:PLoS One;9(10):e109532, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ucides cordatus is an abundant mangrove crab in Brazil constructing burrows of up to 2 m depth. Sediment around burrows may oxidize during low tides. This increase in sediment-air contact area may enhance carbon degradation processes. We hypothesized that 1) the sediment CO2 efflux rate is greater with burrows than without and 2) the reduction potential in radial profiles in the sediment surrounding the burrows decreases gradually, until approximating non-bioturbated conditions. Sampling was conducted during the North Brazilian wet season at neap tides. CO2 efflux rates of inhabited burrows and plain sediment were measured with a CO2/H2O gas analyzer connected to a respiration chamber. Sediment redox potential, pH and temperature were measured in the sediment surrounding the burrows at horizontal distances of 2, 5, 8 and 15 cm at four sediment depths (1, 10, 30 and 50 cm) and rH values were calculated. Sediment cores (50 cm length) were taken to measure the same parameters for plain sediment. CO2 efflux rates of plain sediment and individual crab burrows with entrance diameters of 7 cm were 0.7-1.3 µmol m-2 s-1 and 0.2-0.4 µmol burrows-1 s-1, respectively. CO2 released from a Rhizophora mangle dominated forest with an average of 1.7 U. cordatus burrows-1 m-2 yielded 1.0-1.7 µmol m-2 s-1, depending on the month and burrow entrance diameter. Laboratory experiments revealed that 20-60% of the CO2 released by burrows originated from crab respiration. Temporal changes in the reduction potential in the sediment surrounding the burrows did not influence the CO2 release from burrows. More oxidized conditions of plain sediment over time may explain the increase in CO2 release until the end of the wet season. CO2 released by U. cordatus and their burrows may be a significant pathway of CO2 export from mangrove sediments and should be considered in mangrove carbon budget estimates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0109532

  10 / 262121 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25317397
[Au] Autor:Shrestha P; Safdar SA; Jawad SA; Shaaban H; Dieguez J; Elberaqdar E; Rai S; Adelman M
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Newark, New Jersey, USA ; Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Newark, New Jersey, USA....
[Ti] Title:Successful closure of a bronchopleural fistula by intrapleural administration of fibrin sealant: a case report with review of literature.
[So] Source:N Am J Med Sci;6(9):487-90, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2250-1541
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: There are no established guidelines for the proper treatment of patients with bronchopleural fistulas (BPFs). Apart from attempts to close the fistula, emphasis of treatment and management is placed on preventive measures, early administration of antibiotics, drainage of the empyema and aggressive nutritional and rehabilitative support. CASE REPORT: A 53-year-old male presented with nausea, vomiting, and dry cough with eventual respiratory failure. He was found to have an empyema of the left hemithorax which was managed with thoracostomy drainage and antibiotics. However, he had persistent air leak through the chest tube due to a BPF. Bronchoscopy failed to localize the involved segment. Application of fibrin glue through the chest tube succeeded in completely sealing the leak. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first case report in which fibrin glue was successfully used intrapleurally to close a BPF related to an empyema.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141018
[Lr] Last revision date:141018
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141015
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/1947-2714.141660


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