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[PMID]: 26986499
[Au] Autor:Zhang C; Lai C; Zeng G; Huang D; Yang C; Wang Y; Zhou Y; Cheng M
[Ad] Address:College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082, PR China; Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha, 410082, PR China....
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of carbonaceous nanocomposites for sorbing ionizable antibiotic sulfamethazine from aqueous solution.
[So] Source:Water Res;95:103-12, 2016 May 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-2448
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper investigated the key factors and mechanisms of sulfamethazine (SMT) sorption on a novel carbonaceous nanocomposite, and the effects of harsh aging on SMT sorption in the presence and absence of soil and before as well as after aging. The carbonaceous nanocomposites were synthesized by dip-coating straw biomass in carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes solution and then pyrolyzed at 300 °C and 600 °C in the absence of air. The sorption performance of high temperature carbonaceous nanocomposite on SMT was excellent, as measured sorption distribution coefficient in the order of 10(3)-10(5.5) L kg(-1). Carbonaceous nanocomposites were aged either alone or mixed with soil via exposure to nutrients and soil extract (biological aging) or 80 °C for 100 d (chemical aging). No obvious effects of harsh aging on SMT sorption were observed in the presence of soil and/or biological and chemical aging. The primary mechanisms for SMT sorption included partition caused by Van der Waals forces and adsorption caused by hydrogen bonding and π-π electron-donor-acceptor interaction. Comprehensively considering the cost, renewability, and the application to real water samples, the carbonaceous nanocomposites have potential in removal of SMT and possibly other persistent organic pollutants from wastewater.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 27077316
[Au] Autor:Härmark J; Hebert H; Koeck PJ
[Ad] Address:School of Technology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: jharmark@kth.se.
[Ti] Title:Shell thickness determination of polymer-shelled microbubbles using transmission electron microscopy.
[So] Source:Micron;85:39-43, 2016 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4291
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intravenously injected microbubbles (MBs) can be utilized as ultrasound contrast agent (CA) resulting in enhanced image quality. A novel CA, consisting of air filled MBs stabilized with a shell of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been developed. These spherical MBs have been decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in order to serve as both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) CA. In this study, a mathematical model was introduced that determined the shell thickness of two types of SPIONs decorated MBs (Type A and Type B). The shell thickness of MBs is important to determine, as it affects the acoustical properties. In order to investigate the shell thickness, thin sections of plastic embedded MBs were prepared and imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the sections were cut at random distances from the MB center, which affected the observed shell thickness. Hence, the model determined the average shell thickness of the MBs from corrected mean values of the outer and inner radii observed in the TEM sections. The model was validated using simulated slices of MBs with known shell thickness and radius. The average shell thickness of Type A and Type B MBs were 651nm and 637nm, respectively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 26835659
[Au] Autor:van Winkelhoff AJ; Rurenga P; Wekema-Mulder GJ; Singadji ZM; Rams TE
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Microbiology, Medical School, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; Center for Dentistry and Oral Hygiene, Dental School, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands....
[Ti] Title:Non-oral gram-negative facultative rods in chronic periodontitis microbiota.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;94:117-22, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The subgingival prevalence of gram-negative facultative rods not usually inhabiting or indigenous to the oral cavity (non-oral GNFR), as well as selected periodontal bacterial pathogens, were evaluated by culture in untreated and treated chronic periodontitis patients. METHODS: Subgingival biofilm specimens from 102 untreated and 101 recently treated adults with chronic periodontitis in the Netherlands were plated onto MacConkey III and Dentaid selective media with air-5% CO2 incubation for isolation of non-oral GNFR, and onto enriched Oxoid blood agar with anaerobic incubation for recovery of selected periodontal bacterial pathogens. Suspected non-oral GNFR clinical isolates were identified to a species level with the VITEK 2 automated system. RESULTS: A total of 87 (42.9%) out of 203 patients yielded subgingival non-oral GNFR. Patients recently treated with periodontal mechanical debridement therapy demonstrated a greater prevalence of non-oral GNFR (57.4% vs 28.4%, P < 0.0001), and a greater number of different non-oral GNFR species (23 vs 14 different species), than untreated patients. Sphingomonas paucimobilis was the most frequently isolated subgingival non-oral GNFR species. Several GNFR species normally found in animals and human zoonotic infections, and not previously detected in human subgingival biofilms, were recovered from some patients, including Bordetella bronchispetica, Pasteurella canis, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Neisseria zoodegmatis. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia were significantly associated with the presence of subgingival non-oral GNFR. CONCLUSIONS: A surprisingly high proportion of Dutch chronic periodontitis patients yielded cultivable non-oral GNFR in periodontal pockets, particularly among those recently treated with periodontal mechanical debridement therapy. Since non-oral GNFR species may resist mechanical debridement from periodontal pockets, and are often not susceptible to many antibiotics frequently used in periodontal practice, their subgingival presence may complicate periodontal treatment in species-positive patients and increase risk of potentially dangerous GNFR infections developing at other body sites.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 27004999
[Au] Autor:Viikmäe B; Soomere T
[Ad] Address:Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia. Electronic address: bert@ioc.ee.
[Ti] Title:Temporal scales for nearshore hits of current-driven pollution in the Gulf of Finland.
[So] Source:Mar Pollut Bull;106(1-2):77-86, 2016 May 15.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3363
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lagrangian trajectories of water parcels reconstructed using the TRACMASS model from three-dimensional velocity fields by the RCO model for 1965-2004 are used to analyse the temporal scales and the probability for the hits to the nearshore by pollution originating from a major fairway in the Gulf of Finland and transported by surface currents. Increasing the simulation length from 10 to 20days induces a linear increase in particle age, but the pattern of nearshore hits remains the same. A reasonable benefit can be reached by relatively small shifts of certain parts of the present fairway in a few locations. The overall probabilities do not reveal any trend for 1965-2004. The largest changes in the nearshore hits are revealed for the proportion of hits to the opposite nearshore areas. This feature probably reflects an abrupt turn of the geostrophic air-flow over the southern Baltic Sea by ~40° since 1987.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 26994838
[Au] Autor:Uno K; Tano S; Yoshihara M; Mayama M; Ukai M; Kishigami Y; Nishikawa Y; Takeichi Y; Oguchi H
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics, Perinatal Medical Center, Toyota Memorial Hospital, Toyota, Aichi, Japan....
[Ti] Title:A Case Report and Literature Review of Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra.
[So] Source:J Emerg Med;50(5):e231-6, 2016 May.
[Is] ISSN:0736-4679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pyometra is defined as an accumulation of purulent material in the uterine cavity. Spontaneous perforation is a very rare complication of pyometra. The clinical findings of perforated pyometra are similar to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and other causes of acute abdomen. CASE REPORT: We report a rare and difficult case of peritonitis in an elderly female that was caused by a spontaneous perforation of pyometra. A 90-year-old postmenopausal woman was referred to our hospital with complaints of vomiting, fever, and abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed a large amount of ascites, cystic mass in the uterus, and intraperitoneal and intrauterine air. Transvaginal ultrasound demonstrated a thin area around the fundus. An emergency laparotomy was performed for the suspected gastrointestinal perforation or perforation of pyometra. At laparotomy, copious purulent fluid was present in the peritoneal cavity; however, no perforation of the gastrointestinal tract was observed. We identified a perforation site over the uterine fundus and purulent material exuding from the cavity. Subsequently, hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 13 with no complications. Histopathologic studies revealed endometritis and myometritis with no evidence of malignancy. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: With diffuse peritonitis, ruptured pyometra should be considered, even in elderly female patients. This case illustrates the importance of clinical knowledge of acute gynecologic diseases. Here we also review the perforation of pyometra with no evidence of malignancy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 27123365
[Au] Autor:Brannen DE; Alhammad A; Branum M; Schmitt A
[Ad] Address:Greene County Public Health, 360 Wilson Drive, Xenia, OH 45385, USA; Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435, USA; Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH 45207, USA....
[Ti] Title:International Air Travel to Ohio, USA, and the Impact on Malaria, Influenza, and Hepatitis A.
[So] Source:Scientifica (Cairo);2016:8258946, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2090-908X
[Cp] Country of publication:Egypt
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The State of Ohio led the United States in measles in 2014, ostensibly related to international air travel (IAT), and ranked lower than 43 other states in infectious disease outbreak preparedness. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using surveillance data of the total Ohio population of 11 million from 2010 through 2014 with a nested case control of air travelers to determine the risk of malaria, seasonal influenza hospitalizations (IH), and hepatitis A (HA) disease related to international travel and to estimate the association with domestic enplanement. IAT appeared protective for HA and IH with a risk of 0.031 (.02-.04) but for malaria was 2.7 (2.07-3.62). Enplanement increased the risk for nonendemic M 3.5 (2.5-4.9) and for HA and IH 1.39 (1.34-1.44). IAT's ratio of relative risk (RRR) of malaria to HA and IH was 87.1 (55.8-136) greater than 219 times versus domestic enplanement which was protective for malaria at 0.397 (0.282-0.559). Malaria is correlated with IAT with cases increasing by 6.9 for every 10,000 passports issued.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160430
[Lr] Last revision date:160430
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160428
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2016/8258946

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[PMID]: 27123023
[Au] Autor:Rim DC
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Kim Young Soo Spine & Joint Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Quantitative Pfirrmann Disc Degeneration Grading System to Overcome the Limitation of Pfirrmann Disc Degeneration Grade.
[So] Source:Korean J Spine;13(1):1-8, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1738-2262
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade is one of morphologic disc degeneration grading system and it was reliable on routine T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the agreement of Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade, and check the alternative technique of disc degeneration grading system. METHODS: Fifteen volunteers (4 medical doctors related to spinal disease, 2 medical doctors not related to spinal disease, 6 nurses in spinal hospital, and 3 para-medicines) were included in this study. Three different digitalized MR images were provided all volunteers, and they checked Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade of each disc levels after careful listening to explanation. Indeed, all volunteers checked the signal intensity of disc degeneration at the points of nucleus pulposus (NP), disc membrane, ligaments, fat, and air to modify the quantitative Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade. RESULTS: Total 225 grade results of Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade and 405 signal intensity results of quantitative Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade were analyzed. Average interobserver agreement was "moderate (mean±standard deviation, 0.575±0.251)" from poor to excellent. Completely agreed levels of Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade were only 4 levels (26.67%), and the disagreement levels were observed in 11 levels; two different grades in 8 levels (53.33%) and three different grades in 3 levels (20%). Quantitative Pfirrmann disc degeneration showed relatively cluster distribution with the interobserver deviations of 0.41-1.56 at the ratio of NP and disc membrane, and it showed relatively good cluster and distribution indicating that the proposed grading system has good discrimination ability. CONCLUSION: Pfirrmann disc degeneration grade showed the limitation of different interobserver results, but this limitation could be overcome by using quantitative techniques of MR signal intensity. Further evaluation is needed to access its advantage and reliabilities.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160430
[Lr] Last revision date:160430
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160428
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.14245/kjs.2016.13.1.1

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[PMID]: 27113125
[Au] Autor:Sharma S; Magnuson JJ; Batt RD; Winslow LA; Korhonen J; Aono Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3P1J3, Canada....
[Ti] Title:Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;6:25061, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160430
[Lr] Last revision date:160430
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep25061

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[PMID]: 27112792
[Au] Autor:Wang M; Wang Y; Wu H; Xu J; Li T; Hegebarth D; Jetter R; Chen L; Wang Z
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China....
[Ti] Title:Three TaFAR genes function in the biosynthesis of primary alcohols and the response to abiotic stresses in Triticum aestivum.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;6:25008, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cuticular waxes play crucial roles in protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses. They are complex mixtures of very-long-chain fatty acids and their derivatives, including C20-C32 fatty alcohols. Here, we report the identification of 32 FAR-like genes and the detailed characterization of TaFAR2, TaFAR3 and TaFAR4, wax biosynthetic genes encoding fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase (FAR) in wheat leaf cuticle. Heterologous expression of the three TaFARs in wild-type yeast and mutated yeast showed that TaFAR2, TaFAR3 and TaFAR4 were predominantly responsible for the accumulation of C18:0, C28:0 and C24:0 primary alcohols, respectively. Transgenic expression of the three TaFARs in tomato fruit and Arabidopsis cer4 mutant led to increased production of C22:0-C30:0 primary alcohols. GFP-fusion protein injection assay showed that the three encoded TaFAR proteins were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the site of wax biosynthesis. The transcriptional expression of the three TaFAR genes was induced by cold, salt, drought and ABA. Low air humidity led to increased expression of TaFAR genes and elevated wax accumulation in wheat leaves. Collectively, these data suggest that TaFAR2, TaFAR3 and TaFAR4 encode active alcohol-forming FARs involved in the synthesis of primary alcohol in wheat leaf and the response to environmental stresses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160430
[Lr] Last revision date:160430
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep25008

  10 / 284946 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27107129
[Au] Autor:Byun HM; Colicino E; Trevisi L; Fan T; Christiani DC; Baccarelli AA
[Ad] Address:Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK....
[Ti] Title:Effects of Air Pollution and Blood Mitochondrial DNA Methylation on Markers of Heart Rate Variability.
[So] Source:J Am Heart Assoc;5(4), 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2047-9980
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The mitochondrion is the primary target of oxidative stress in response to exogenous environments. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is independent from nuclear DNA and uses separate epigenetic machinery to regulate mtDNA methylation. The mtDNA damage induced by oxidative stress can cause mitochondrial dysfunction and is implicated in human diseases; however, mtDNA methylation has been largely overlooked in environmental studies relating to human disease. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between exposure to fine metal-rich particulates (particulate matter <2.5 µm in diameter [PM2.5]) from welding in a boilermaker union and blood mtDNA methylation in relation to heart rate variability. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight healthy men were recruited on multiple sampling cycles at the Boilermaker Union Local 29, located in Quincy, Massachusetts. We measured personal PM2.5 in the background ambient environment. We measured blood mtDNA methylation in the mtDNA promoter (D-loop) and genes essential for ATP synthesis (MT-TF and MT-RNR1) by bisulfite pyrosequencing. All analyses were adjusted for demographics, type of job, season, welding-work day, and mtDNA methylation experimental batch effect. The participants' PM2.5 exposure was significantly higher after a welding-work day (mean 0.38 mg/m(3)) than the background personal level (mean 0.15 mg/m(3), P<0.001). Blood mtDNA methylation in the D-loop promoter was associated with PM2.5 levels (ß=-0.99%, SE=0.41, P=0.02). MT-TF and MT-RNR1 methylation was not associated with PM2.5 exposure (ß=0.10%, SE=0.45, P=0.82). Interaction of PM2.5 exposure levels and D-loop promoter methylation was significantly associated with markers of heart rate variability. CONCLUSIONS: Blood mtDNA methylation levels were negatively associated with PM2.5 exposure and modified the adverse relationships between PM2.5 exposure and heart rate variability outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1604
[Cu] Class update date: 160430
[Lr] Last revision date:160430
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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