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[PMID]: 25197551
[Au] Autor:Yamamoto Y; Matsui J; Matsushima T; Obaishi H; Miyazaki K; Nakamura K; Tohyama O; Semba T; Yamaguchi A; Hoshi SS; Mimura F; Haneda T; Fukuda Y; Kamata J; Takahashi K; Matsukura M; Wakabayashi T; Asada M; Nomoto K; Watanabe T; Dezso Z; Yoshimatsu K; Funahashi Y; Tsuruoka A
[Ad] Address:Oncology Product Creation Unit, Eisai Product Creation Systems, Eisai Co., Ltd., 5-1-3 Tokodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2635, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Lenvatinib, an angiogenesis inhibitor targeting VEGFR/FGFR, shows broad antitumor activity in human tumor xenograft models associated with microvessel density and pericyte coverage.
[So] Source:Vasc Cell;6:18, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2045-824X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Lenvatinib is an oral inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1-3), fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1-4), platelet growth factor receptor α (PDGFR α), RET and KIT. Antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib in VEGF- and FGF-driven angiogenesis models in both in vitro and in vivo was determined. Roles of tumor vasculature (microvessel density (MVD) and pericyte coverage) as biomarkers for lenvatinib were also examined in this study. METHOD: We evaluated antiangiogenesis activity of lenvatinib against VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. Effects of lenvatinib on in vivo angiogenesis, which was enhanced by overexpressed VEGF or FGF in human pancreatic cancer KP-1 cells, were examined in the mouse dorsal air sac assay. We determined antitumor activity of lenvatinib in a broad panel of human tumor xenograft models to test if vascular score, which consisted of high MVD and low pericyte coverage, was associated with sensitivity to lenvatinib treatment. Vascular score was also analyzed using human tumor specimens with 18 different types of human primary tumors. RESULT: Lenvatinib inhibited VEGF- and FGF-driven proliferation and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In vivo angiogenesis induced by overexpressed VEGF (KP-1/VEGF transfectants) or FGF (KP-1/FGF transfectants) was significantly suppressed with oral treatments of lenvatinib. Lenvatinib showed significant antitumor activity in KP-1/VEGF and five 5 of 7 different types of human tumor xenograft models at between 1 to 100 mg/kg. We divided 19 human tumor xenograft models into lenvatinib-sensitive (tumor-shrinkage) and relatively resistant (slow-growth) subgroups based on sensitivity to lenvatinib treatments at 100 mg/kg. IHC analysis showed that vascular score was significantly higher in sensitive subgroup than relatively resistant subgroup (p < 0.0004). Among 18 types of human primary tumors, kidney cancer had the highest MVD, while liver cancer had the lowest pericyte coverage, and cancers in Kidney and Stomach had highest vascular score. CONCLUSION: These results indicated that Lenvatinib inhibited VEGF- and FGF-driven angiogenesis and showed a broad spectrum of antitumor activity with a wide therapeutic window. MVD and pericyte-coverage of tumor vasculature might be biomarkers and suggest cases that would respond for lenvatinib therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140908
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/2045-824X-6-18

  2 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25183428
[Au] Autor:Goeminne PC; Bijnens E; Nemery B; Nawrot TS; Dupont LJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Disease, University Hospital of Leuven, Herestraat 49, Leuven, B-3000, Belgium. pieter.goeminne@student.kuleuven.be.
[Ti] Title:Impact of traffic related air pollution indicators on non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis mortality: a cohort analysis.
[So] Source:Respir Res;15(1):108, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1465-993X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mortality in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is known to be influenced by a number of factors such as gender, age, smoking history and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but the impact of traffic related air pollution indicators on NCFB mortality is unknown. METHODS: We followed 183 patients aged 18 to 65 years with a HRCT proven diagnosis of NCFB and typical symptoms, who had visited the outpatient clinic at the University Hospital of Leuven, Belgium, between June 2006 and October 2012. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) for mortality in relation to proximity of the home to major roads and traffic load, adjusting for relevant covariables (age, gender, disease severity, chronic macrolide use, smoking history, socioeconomic status and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization status). RESULTS: Fifteen out of the 183 included patients died during the observation period. Residential proximity to a major road was associated with the risk of dying with a HR 0.28 (CI 95% 0.10-0.77; p = 0.013) for a tenfold increase in distance to a major road. Mortality was also associated with distance-weighted traffic density within 100 meters (HR for each tenfold increase in traffic density 3.80; CI 95% 1.07-13.51; p = 0.04) and 200 meters from the patient's home address (HR for each tenfold increase in traffic density 4.14; CI 95% 1.13-15.22; p = 0.032). CONCLUSION: Traffic-related air pollution appears to increase the risk of dying in patients with NCFB. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was approved by the local ethical committee of the UZ Leuven, Belgium (ML-5028), registered at ClinicalTrial.gov (NCT01906047).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12931-014-0108-z

  3 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25194204
[Au] Autor:Schmidt MF; Martin Wild J
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology and Neuroscience Program, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: marcschm@sas.upenn.edu.
[Ti] Title:The respiratory-vocal system of songbirds: Anatomy, physiology, and neural control.
[So] Source:Prog Brain Res;212:297-335, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1875-7855
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This wide-ranging review presents an overview of the respiratory-vocal system in songbirds, which are the only other vertebrate group known to display a degree of respiratory control during song rivalling that of humans during speech; this despite the fact that the peripheral components of both the respiratory and vocal systems differ substantially in the two groups. We first provide a brief description of these peripheral components in songbirds (lungs, air sacs and respiratory muscles, vocal organ (syrinx), upper vocal tract) and then proceed to a review of the organization of central respiratory-related neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, the latter having an organization fundamentally similar to that of the ventral respiratory group of mammals. The second half of the review describes the nature of the motor commands generated in a specialized "cortical" song control circuit and how these might engage brainstem respiratory networks to shape the temporal structure of song. We also discuss a bilaterally projecting "respiratory-thalamic" pathway that links the respiratory system to "cortical" song control nuclei. This necessary pathway for song originates in the brainstem's primary inspiratory center and is hypothesized to play a vital role in synchronizing song motor commands both within and across hemispheres.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25194197
[Au] Autor:Jenkin SE; Milsom WK
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Expiration: Breathing's other face.
[So] Source:Prog Brain Res;212:131-47, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1875-7855
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The evolution of the aspiration pump seen in tetrapod vertebrates from the buccal-pharyngeal force pump seen in air breathing fish and amphibians appears to have first involved the production of active expiration. Active inspiration arose later. This appears to have involved reconfiguration of a parafacial oscillator (now the parafacial respiratory group/retrotrapezoid nucleus (pFRG/RTN)) to produce active expiration, followed by reconfiguration of a paravagal oscillator (now the preBötC) to produce active inspiration. In the ancestral breathing cycle, inspiration follows expiration, which is in turn followed by glottal closure and breath holding. When both rhythms are expressed, as they are in reptiles and birds, and mammals under conditions of elevated respiratory drive, the pFRG/RTN appears to initiate the respiratory cycle. We propose that the coordinated output of this system is a ventilation cycle characterized by four phases. In reptiles, these consist of active inspiration (I), glottal closure (E1), a pause (an apnea or breath hold) (E2), and an active expiration (E3) that initiates the next cycle. In mammals under resting conditions, active expiration (E3) is suppressed and inspiration (I) is followed by airway constriction and diaphragmatic braking (E1) (rather than glottal closure) and a short pause at end-expiration (E2). As respiratory drive increases in mammals, expiratory muscle activity appears. Frequently, it first appears immediately preceding inspiration (E3) just as it does in reptiles. It can also appear in E1, however, and it is not yet clear what mechanisms underlie when and where in the cycle it appears. This may reflect whether the active expiration is recruited to enhance tidal volume, increase breathing frequency, or both.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24954660
[Au] Autor:Limones-Herrero D; Pérez-Ruiz R; Jiménez MC; Miranda MA
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Química-Instituto de Tecnología Química UPV-CSIC, Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Retarded photooxidation of cyamemazine in biomimetic microenvironments.
[So] Source:Photochem Photobiol;90(5):1012-6, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1751-1097
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cyamemazine (CMZ) is a neuroleptic drug that mediates cutaneous phototoxicity in humans. Here, the photobehavior of CMZ has been examined within α1 -acid glycoproteins, ß- and γ-cyclodextrins and SDS micelles. In all these microenvironments, CMZ emission was enhanced and blue-shifted, and its lifetime was longer. Irradiation of the entrapped drug at 355 nm, under air; led to the N,S-dioxide. Within glycoproteins or SDS micelles the reaction was clearly slower than in phosphate buffered solution (PBS); protection by cyclodextrins was less marked. Transient absorption spectroscopy in PBS revealed formation of the triplet state ((3) CMZ*) and the radical cation (CMZ(+•) ). Upon addition of glycoprotein, the contribution of CMZ(+•) became negligible, whereas (3) CMZ* dominated the spectra; in addition, the triplet lifetime became considerably longer. In cyclodextrins, this occurred to a lower extent. In all microheterogeneous systems, quenching by oxygen was slower than in solution; this was most remarkable inside glycoproteins. The highest protection from photooxidation was achieved inside SDS micelles. The results are consistent with photooxidation of CMZ through photoionization and subsequent trapping of the resulting radical cation by oxygen. This reaction is extremely sensitive to the medium and constitutes an appropriate probe for localization of the drug within a variety of biological compartments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/php.12303

  6 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25196287
[Au] Autor:Veerabathula P; Patil M; Upputuri O; Durga P
[Ad] Address:Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, India.
[Ti] Title:Simple solution for difficult face mask ventilation in children with orofacial clefts.
[So] Source:Paediatr Anaesth;24(10):1106-8, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1460-9592
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Significant air leak from the facial cleft predisposes to difficult mask ventilation. The reported techniques of use of sterile gauze, larger face mask and laryngeal mask airway after intravenous induction have limited application in uncooperative children. We describe the use of dental impression material molded to the facial contour to cover the facial defect and aid ventilation with an appropriate size face mask in a child with a bilateral Tessier 3 anomaly.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pan.12513

  7 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25197514
[Au] Autor:Azizi M; Azizi F
[Ad] Address:Academy of Medical Sciences of the IR of Iran, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:​​​History of Cholera Outbreaks in Iran during the 19(th) and 20(th) Centuries.
[So] Source:Middle East J Dig Dis;2(1):51-5, 2010 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2008-5230
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cholera is an acute infectious disease with high mortality if left untreated. Historically, between the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries seven great pandemics of cholera occurred and worldwide, thousands of people died. Based on an old theory, cholera was considered an air-born disease and the emergence of its outbreaks were attributed to bad weather or miasma. However later in the 18(th) century, British physician John Snow (1813-1858) explained the association of a terrible cholera outbreak in London in 1849 to contamination of the drinking water supply with human excreta. Despite his finding, the causative agent of this dreaded illness was unidentified until later in the 19(th) century. In 1854, Filippo Pacini (1812-1883) an anatomist from Italy and then in 1883, Robert Koch (1843-1910) the German bacteriologist, discovered 'vibrio cholerae' as the etiologic agent. During the major pandemics of cholera in 19th and 20th centuries this illness reached Iran and led to vast depopulation and a crucial impact on the country's socioeconomic status. Poor public health conditions, lack of a well-organized public health authority for implementing preventive and quarantine measures as well as Iran's specific geographic location were the main facilitating factors of the emergence of various epidemics, including cholera in Iran. The present paper briefly reviews the cholera outbreaks in Iran during the 19(th) and 20(th) centuries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140908
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  8 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24854875
[Au] Autor:Liu M; Zhang X; Yang B; Liu L; Deng F; Zhang X; Wei Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemistry/Institute of Polymers, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang, 330031, China.
[Ti] Title:Polylysine Crosslinked AIE Dye Based Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles for Biological Imaging Applications.
[So] Source:Macromol Biosci;14(9):1260-7, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1616-5195
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fluorescent organic nanoparticles based on aggregation induced emission dyes are fabricated through a ring-opening reaction using polylysine as the linker. The fluorescent organic nanoparticles obtained are characterized by a series of techniques including UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A biocompatibility evaluation and the cell uptake behavior of the fluorescent organic nanoparticles are further investigated to evaluate their potential biomedical applications. It is demonstrated that these fluorescent organic nanoparticles can be obtained at room temperature in an air atmosphere without the need for catalyst or initiator. Furthermore, these crosslinked aggregation induced emission dye based fluorescent organic nanoparticles show uniform morphology, strong red fluorescence, high water dispersability, and excellent biocompatibility, making them promising candidates for various biomedical applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/mabi.201400140

  9 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25197300
[Au] Autor:Ajami S; Arzani-Birgani A
[Ad] Address:Health Information Technology and Management Department, Health Management and Economics Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Fast resuscitation and care of the burn patients by telemedicine: A review.
[So] Source:J Res Med Sci;19(6):562-6, 2014 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1735-1995
[Cp] Country of publication:Iran
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In Iran, burns are the second most common cause of death, after traffic accidents in individuals under the age of 15 years. Many burned patients die or suffer injury due to lack of immediate care, so we need to use an alternative resuscitations to cure them immediately. Telemedicine describes the use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve patients' health status and care. The aim of this study was to express the advantages of Telemedicine to resuscitate and care burn patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a narrative review. The literature was searched on fast resuscitation and care of the patients' burn by telemedicine with the help of libraries, databases, and also searches engines available at Google, Google scholar, books and conference proceedings. In our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations: Telemedicine, Telecare, Burn, Burn patient, Air transport, Triage and Health Information Management in the searching areas of titles, keywords, abstracts and full texts. RESULTS: In this study, more than 78 articles and reports were collected and 30 of them were selected based on their relevancy. CONCLUSION: Acute evaluation of burn patients can be performed by the telemedicine and it plays an important role in improving access to the required expertise, and raises physician confidence in treating burn patients. This can reduce under-triage or over-triage for air transport and finally lead to saving time and cost.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140908
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE

  10 / 260453 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24251954
[Au] Autor:Orman G; Tekes A; Poretti A; Robertson C; Huisman TA
[Ad] Address:Section of Pediatric Neuroradiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
[Ti] Title:Posttraumatic Carotid Artery Dissection in Children: Not to be missed!
[So] Source:J Neuroimaging;24(5):467-72, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6569
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic carotid artery dissection (PTCAD) may result in acute arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). Pediatric PTCAD is rarely diagnosed prior to onset of neurological symptoms. We report on neuroimaging findings in a series of children with PTCAD. METHODS: Five children with head or neck trauma were included in this study. Clinical histories were reviewed for mechanism of trauma, symptoms, complications, therapy, and outcome. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT/MR angiography (CTA, MRA) studies were retrospectively evaluated for signs and complications of PTCAD and presence and extent of skull base fractures. RESULTS: PTCAD was located at the level of the skull base in all children and was associated with a skull base fracture in two. The diagnosis was made in five children by combined MRI/MRA and in two by CTA. Air in the carotid canal suggested skull base injury with PTCAD in two children. PTCAD was complicated by AIS in three children. CONCLUSION: PTCAD may result from neck and head trauma. To avoid secondary AIS, radiologists should be familiar with neuroimaging findings in children, especially as acute PTCAD may initially be clinically silent. Consequently, pediatric neuroradiologists should actively exclude PTCAD in children with head and neck trauma.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jon.12071


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