Database : MEDLINE
Search on : ancylostomiasis [Words]
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[PMID]: 24879000
[Au] Autor:Casmo V; Augusto G; Nala R; Sabonete A; Carvalho-Costa FA
[Ad] Address:Laboratório de Parasitologia Intestinal e Vesical do Instituto Nacional de Saúde de Moçambique, Cidade de Maputo, Moçambique....
[Ti] Title:The effect of hookworm infection and urinary schistosomiasis on blood hemoglobin concentration of schoolchildren living in northern Mozambique.
[So] Source:Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo;56(3):219-24, 2014 May-Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1678-9946
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study aims to assess the association between schistosomiasis and hookworm infection with hemoglobin levels of schoolchildren in northern Mozambique. Through a cross-sectional survey, 1,015 children from five to 12 years old in the provinces of Nampula, Cabo Delgado and Niassa were studied. Hookworm infection and urinary schistosomiasis were diagnosed, through Ritchie and filtration methods, with a prevalence of 31.3% and 59.1%, respectively. Hemoglobin levels were obtained with a portable photometer (Hemocue®). The average hemoglobin concentration was 10.8 ± 1.42 g/dL, and 62.1% of the children presented levels below 11.5 g/dL, of which 11.8% of the total number of children had hemoglobin levels below 9 g/dL. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated negative interactions between hemoglobin levels and ancylostomiasis, this being restricted to the province of Cabo Delgado (ß = -0.55; p < 0.001) where an independent interaction between hemoglobin levels and urinary schistosomiasis was also observed (ß = -0.35; p = 0.016). The logistical regression model indicated that hookworm infection represents a predictor of mild (OR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.17-3.00) and moderate/severe anemia (OR = 2.71; 95% CI = 1.50 - 4.89). We concluded that, in the province of Cabo Delgado, hookworm and Schistosoma haematobium infections negatively influence hemoglobin levels in schoolchildren. Periodical deworming should be considered in the region. Health education and improvements in sanitary infrastructure could achieve long-term and sustainable reductions in soil-transmitted helminthiases and schistosomiasis prevalence rates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24768317
[Au] Autor:d'Ovidio D; Pepe P; Ianniello D; Noviello E; Quinton JF; Cringoli G; Rinaldi L
[Ad] Address:Private Practitioner, Naples, Italy....
[Ti] Title:First survey of endoparasites in pet ferrets in Italy.
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;203(1-2):227-30, 2014 Jun 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Endoparasites are infrequently reported in ferrets. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in pet ferrets in southern Italy. Fresh fecal samples were randomly collected from 50 ferrets housed in pet shops or privately owned. All fecal samples were processed using the FLOTAC pellet technique to identify and count helminthic eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts/oocysts. In addition, the samples were analyzed also by the Remel XpectGiardia/Cryptosporidium immunoassay. Intestinal parasites were detected in 15 out of 50 ferrets (30%). Eggs of ancylostomids were found in 28.0% (14/50) of the animals and oocysts of Sarcocystis were detected in one ferret (2.0%). None of the samples was positive for Cryptosporidium or Giardia. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of sarcosporidiosis in a pet ferret in Italy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostomiasis/veterinary
Ferrets/parasitology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/veterinary
Parasitic Diseases, Animal/epidemiology
Pets/parasitology
Sarcocystosis/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma
Ancylostomiasis/diagnosis
Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feces/parasitology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/parasitology
Italy
Parasite Egg Count
Parasitic Diseases, Animal/diagnosis
Parasitic Diseases, Animal/parasitology
Prevalence
Sarcocystis
Sarcocystosis/diagnosis
Sarcocystosis/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140512
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24175305
[Au] Autor:Liu Y; Zheng G; Alsarakibi M; Zhang X; Hu W; Lu P; Lin L; Tan L; Luo Q; Li G
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China.
[Ti] Title:Molecular identification of Ancylostoma caninum isolated from cats in southern China based on complete ITS sequence.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2013:868050, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ancylostoma caninum is a blood-feeding parasitic intestinal nematode which infects dogs, cats, and other mammals throughout the world. A highly sensitive and species-specific PCR-RFLP technique was utilised to detect the prevalence of A. caninum in cats in Guangzhou, southern China. Of the 102 fecal samples examined, the prevalence of A. caninum in cats was 95.1% and 83.3% using PCR-RFLP and microscopy, respectively. Among them, the prevalence of single hookworm infection with A. caninum was 54.90%, while mixed infections with both A. caninum and A. ceylanicum were 40.20%. Comparative analysis of three complete ITS sequences obtained from cat-derived A. caninum showed the same length (738 bp) as that of dog-derived A. caninum. However, the sequence variation range was 98.6%-100%, where only one cat isolate (M63) showed 100% sequence similarity in comparison with two dog-derived A. caninum isolates (AM850106, EU159416) in the same studied area. The phylogenetic tree revealed A. caninum derived from both cats and dogs in single cluster. Results suggest that cats could be the main host of A. caninum in China, which may cause cross-infection between dogs and cats in the same area.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/genetics
Ancylostoma/isolation & purification
Ancylostomiasis/veterinary
Cat Diseases/parasitology
RNA, Helminth/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma/classification
Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Animals
Cat Diseases/epidemiology
Cats
China/epidemiology
Dogs
Feces/parasitology
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Prevalence
RNA, Helminth/isolation & purification
Species Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Helminth)
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131031
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2013/868050

  4 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24703073
[Au] Autor:Prullage JB; Knaus M; Bowman DD; Chester ST; Visser M; Rehbein S; Rosentel J
[Ad] Address:Merial Ltd., Duluth, GA 30096, USA. Electronic address: joseph.prullage@merial.com....
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of a novel topical combination of fipronil, (S)-methoprene, eprinomectin and praziquantel against induced infections of Ancylostoma spp. nematodes of cats.
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;202(1-2):30-3, 2014 Apr 28.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Four studies were conducted to examine the efficacy of a novel topical combination of fipronil, (S)-methoprene, eprinomectin, and praziquantel (BROADLINE(®), Merial) against Ancylostoma tubaeforme and Ancylostoma braziliense hookworms of cats. In each study, purpose-bred cats were randomly assigned to treatment groups of 10 or 12 cats per group. In three studies the cats were inoculated with A. tubaeforme and in one study with A. braziliense. The inoculations were undertaken on a schedule which resulted in the hookworms reaching the fourth larval stage in two of the studies, or the adult stage in four of the studies, by the day of treatment. In each study there was also an untreated control and 1 or 2 groups treated with the novel combination. In the two studies where efficacy against the fourth larval stage of A. tubaeforme was tested, the efficacy recorded was 100%. In the three studies where efficacy against the adult stage of A. tubaeforme was tested, efficacy of 100% was also confirmed. In the study where efficacy against the adult stage of A. braziliense was tested efficacy was 99.5%.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostomiasis/veterinary
Antiparasitic Agents/administration & dosage
Cat Diseases/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma/physiology
Ancylostomiasis/drug therapy
Animals
Cats
Drug Combinations
Ivermectin/administration & dosage
Ivermectin/analogs & derivatives
Methoprene/administration & dosage
Praziquantel/administration & dosage
Pyrazoles/administration & dosage
Random Allocation
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiparasitic Agents); 0 (Drug Combinations); 0 (Pyrazoles); 160902-72-7 (4''-epiacetylamino-4''-deoxyavermectin B1); 6490C9U457 (Praziquantel); 70288-86-7 (Ivermectin); 8B830OJ2UX (Methoprene); QGH063955F (fipronil)
[Em] Entry month:1406
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140407
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23968813
[Au] Autor:Traub RJ
[Ad] Address:School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland 4343, Australia. Electronic address: r.traub@uq.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Ancylostoma ceylanicum, a re-emerging but neglected parasitic zoonosis.
[So] Source:Int J Parasitol;43(12-13):1009-15, 2013 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0135
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although Ancylostoma ceylanicum is known to be an endemic and widely distributed hookworm of dogs and cats in Asia, its contribution to human morbidity as a potentially zoonotic hookworm remains largely unexplored. Since its discovery by Lane (1913) as a 'new parasite' of humans a century ago, the hookworm has been regarded as a 'rare' and 'abnormal' parasite and largely overlooked in surveys of human parasites. Recent molecular-based surveys in Asia, however, have demonstrated that A. ceylanicum is the second most common hookworm species infecting humans, comprising between 6% and 23% of total patent hookworm infections. In experimentally induced infections, A. ceylanicum mimics the clinical picture produced by the anthroponotic hookworms of 'ground itch' and moderate to severe abdominal pain in the acute phase. Natural infections with A. ceylanicum in humans have been reported in almost all geographical areas in which the hookworm is known to be endemic in dogs and cats, however for the majority of reports, no clinical data are available. Much like the anthroponotic hookworm species, patent A. ceylanicum adults can isolate within the jejunum to produce chronic infections that on occasion, may occur in high enough burdens to produce anaemia. In addition, the hookworm can act much like Ancylostoma caninum and be found lower in the gastrointestinal tract leading to abdominal distension and pain, diarrhoea and occult blood in the faeces accompanied by peripheral eosinophilia. Whether A. ceylanicum is capable of producing both classical hookworm disease and evoking morbidity through an uncontrolled allergic response in some individuals remains unascertained. Future investigations combining the use of molecular diagnostic tools with clinical and pathological data will shed further light on its role as a human pathogen. The control of this zoonosis necessitates an integrated and inter-sectorial "One Health" approach be adopted in communities where large numbers of dogs share a close relationship with humans.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/parasitology
Zoonoses
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma
Animals
Asia/epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1405
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131002
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23891152
[Au] Autor:Nguyen JB; Pool CD; Wong CY; Treger RS; Williams DL; Cappello M; Lea WA; Simeonov A; Vermeire JJ; Modis Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
[Ti] Title:Peroxiredoxin-1 from the human hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum forms a stable oxidized decamer and is covalently inhibited by conoidin A.
[So] Source:Chem Biol;20(8):991-1001, 2013 Aug 22.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1301
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hookworms are parasitic nematodes that have a devastating impact on global health, particularly in developing countries. We report a biochemical and structural analysis of a peroxiredoxin from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum, AcePrx-1. Peroxiredoxins provide antioxidant protection and act as signaling molecules and chaperones. AcePrx-1 is expressed in adult hookworms and can be inactivated by 2,3-bis(bromomethyl)quinoxaline-1,4-dioxide (conoidin A). Conoidin A inactivates AcePrx-1 by alkylating or crosslinking the catalytic cysteines, while maintaining the enzyme in the "locally unfolded" conformation. Irreversible oxidation of the resolving cysteine may contribute additional inhibitory activity. A crystal structure of oxidized AcePrx-1 reveals a disulfide-linked decamer. A helix macrodipole near the active site increases the reactivity of the catalytic cysteines to conoidin A. This work demonstrates the promise of conoidin compounds as probes to evaluate peroxiredoxins as drug targets in human parasites.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/enzymology
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Peroxiredoxins/antagonists & inhibitors
Peroxiredoxins/chemistry
Quinoxalines/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Sequence
Ancylostoma/chemistry
Animals
Catalytic Domain/drug effects
Crystallography, X-Ray
Humans
Models, Molecular
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxidation-Reduction/drug effects
Peroxiredoxins/metabolism
Protein Conformation
Protein Multimerization/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Quinoxalines); 0 (conoidin A); EC 1.11.1.15 (Peroxiredoxins)
[Em] Entry month:1402
[Cu] Class update date: 140502
[Lr] Last revision date:140502
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130826
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23764662
[Au] Autor:Cediel N; Villamil LC; Romero J; Renteria L; De Meneghi D
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie, Università degli Studi di Torino, Turin, Italy. swasanata@gmail.com,
[Ti] Title:Setting priorities for surveillance, prevention, and control of zoonoses in Bogotá, Colombia.
[So] Source:Rev Panam Salud Publica;33(5):316-24, 2013 May.
[Is] ISSN:1680-5348
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To establish priorities for zoonoses surveillance, prevention, and control in Bogotá, Colombia. METHODS: A Delphi panel of experts in veterinary and human medicine was conducted using a validated prioritization method to assess the importance of 32 selected zoonoses. This exercise was complemented by a questionnaire survey, using the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) methodology, administered in 19 districts of Bogotá from September 2009 to April 2010 to an at-risk population (workers at veterinary clinics; pet shops; butcher shops; and traditional food markets that sell poultry, meat, cheese, and eggs). A risk indicator based on level of knowledge about zoonoses was constructed using categorical principal component and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Twelve experts participated in the Delphi panel. The diseases scored as highest priority were: influenza A(H1N1), salmonellosis, Escherichia coli infection, leptospirosis, and rabies. The diseases scored as lowest priority were: ancylostomiasis, scabies, ringworm, and trichinellosis. A total of 535 questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Respondents claimed to have had scabies (21%), fungi (8%), brucellosis (8%), and pulicosis (8%). Workers with the most limited knowledge on zoonoses and therefore the highest health risk were those who 1) did not have a professional education, 2) had limited or no zoonoses prevention training, and 3) worked in Usme, Bosa, or Ciudad Bolívar districts. CONCLUSIONS: According to the experts, influenza A(H1N1) was the most important zoonoses. Rabies, leptospirosis, brucellosis, and toxoplasmosis were identified as priority diseases by both the experts and the exposed workers. This is the first prioritization exercise focused on zoonoses surveillance, prevention, and control in Colombia. These results could be used to guide decision-making for resource allocation in public health.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Epidemiological Monitoring
Health Priorities
Zoonoses/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Animals
Colombia/epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk Factors
Urban Health
Young Adult
Zoonoses/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130614
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24445211
[Au] Autor:Knopp S; Salim N; Schindler T; Karagiannis Voules DA; Rothen J; Lweno O; Mohammed AS; Singo R; Benninghoff M; Nsojo AA; Genton B; Daubenberger C
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Department of Life Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom; Bagamoyo Research and Training Centre, Ifakara Health Institute, Bagamoyo, United Republic of Tanzania; Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; Division for Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Ludwig-Maximilians University Hospital, Munich, Germany; National Institute for Medical Research, Mbeya Medical Research Center, Mbeya, Tanzania.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostic accuracy of Kato-Katz, FLOTAC, Baermann, and PCR methods for the detection of light-intensity hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis infections in Tanzania.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;90(3):535-45, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sensitive diagnostic tools are crucial for an accurate assessment of helminth infections in low-endemicity areas. We examined stool samples from Tanzanian individuals and compared the diagnostic accuracy of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the FLOTAC technique and the Kato-Katz method for hookworm and the Baermann method for Strongyloides stercoralis detection. Only FLOTAC had a higher sensitivity than the Kato-Katz method for hookworm diagnosis; the sensitivities of PCR and the Kato-Katz method were equal. PCR had a very low sensitivity for S. stercoralis detection. The cycle threshold values of the PCR were negatively correlated with the logarithm of hookworm egg and S. stercoralis larvae counts. The median larvae count was significantly lower in PCR false negatives than true positives. All methods failed to detect very low-intensity infections. New diagnostic approaches are needed for monitoring of progressing helminth control programs, confirmation of elimination, or surveillance of disease recrudescence.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Helminthiasis/diagnosis
Helminths/genetics
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/diagnosis
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ancylostoma/genetics
Ancylostoma/isolation & purification
Ancylostomiasis/diagnosis
Animals
Ascariasis/diagnosis
Ascaris lumbricoides/genetics
Ascaris lumbricoides/isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Helminth/analysis
Feces/parasitology
Female
Helminths/isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Larva
Male
Middle Aged
Necator americanus/genetics
Necator americanus/isolation & purification
Necatoriasis/diagnosis
Parasite Egg Count
Schistosoma mansoni/genetics
Schistosoma mansoni/isolation & purification
Schistosomiasis mansoni/diagnosis
Sensitivity and Specificity
Strongyloides stercoralis/genetics
Strongyloides stercoralis/isolation & purification
Strongyloidiasis/diagnosis
Tanzania
Trichuriasis/diagnosis
Trichuris/genetics
Trichuris/isolation & purification
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth)
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.13-0268

  9 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23601667
[Au] Autor:Lee AC; Epe C; Bowman DD
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Box 5, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. cl568@cornell.edu
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Ancylostoma caninum worm counts acquired by endoscopy and necropsy.
[So] Source:Vet Parasitol;196(3-4):538-40, 2013 Sep 23.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2550
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many regulatory agencies require that the efficacy of veterinary anthelmintic medications be evaluated by enumerating parasites in treated and untreated animals after necropsy. Current ethical considerations, i.e., the 3 Rs of research, call for the replacement of this method with less invasive techniques that would not require animal sacrifice. This study tested standard gastrointestinal endoscopy as an in vivo method of quantifying the intestinal hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum. Worm counts were compared with those from gold standard necropsy. Thirteen dogs inoculated with third-stage A. caninum larvae underwent endoscopy 4-6 weeks post-infection, just prior to necropsy. Two-thirds of the adult hookworms were located in the middle section of the small intestine that could not be reached for endoscopic examination. Not surprisingly, the total worm counts obtained by endoscopy did not correlate with those from necropsy (R(2)=0.05, p=0.464). One method to increase small intestinal access would be to use specialized balloon or spiral endoscopes developed for this purpose in human gastroenterology. Based on the results of this study, standard endoscopy alone is unsuitable for quantification of A. caninum in the small intestine. Parasites in more accessible sites, such as whipworms in the cecum and colon, might be more appropriate targets for endoscopic counting.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/physiology
Ancylostomiasis/veterinary
Dog Diseases/parasitology
Endoscopy, Digestive System/veterinary
Gastrointestinal Diseases/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostomiasis/diagnosis
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Animals
Dogs
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases/parasitology
Male
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130812
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 1053 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24431537
[Au] Autor:Indira R; Viveka Vardhani V
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar, Guntur, 522510 AP India.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of ancylostomiasis in people living in slum area, Philhousepet of Eluru, West Godavari District (Andhra Pradesh).
[So] Source:J Parasit Dis;37(1):29-34, 2013 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0971-7196
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hookworm infection was found in the slum area of Eluru, West Godavari District, A.P. which has scheduled caste population. Infection is related to different climatic conditions and socio-economic status of the population. The inhabitants are coolies in agricultural fields and household workers with a poor level of hygiene and sanitation. All the infected positive cases showed Ancylostoma duodenale infection. The prevalence of hookworm infection was 15.6, 17.9 and 14 % in children, 23.5, 27.9 and 20.5 % in adults during summer, rainy and winter seasons respectively. Single species infection was studied in three periods. Out of 264 faecal samples, 128 children (40 males, 32.5 %) and 136 adults (64 men, 25 % and 72 women, 30.5 %) showed helminthic infection in rainy season. Much variation is seen in the prevalence of disease in rainy and winter seasons in all the age groups. The infected individuals were treated with albendazole just after rainy season. Three weeks after antihelminthic treatment, the infection rate among them was lowered; health education also plays a role in reducing the % of infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1401
[Cu] Class update date: 140401
[Lr] Last revision date:140401
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140116
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12639-012-0125-0


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