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[PMID]: 23774318
[Au] Autor:Ngui R; Mahdy MA; Chua KH; Traub R; Lim YA
[Ad] Address:Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Electronic address: romano_sky05@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Genetic characterization of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (cox 1) gene of the zoonotic parasitic nematode, Ancylostoma ceylanicum from humans, dogs and cats.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;128(1):154-7, 2013 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ancylostoma ceylanicum is the only zoonotic hookworm species that is able to produce patent infections in humans with the majority of cases reported in South East Asia. Over the past few years, there have been an increasing number of studies investigating the prevalence of this parasitic zoonosis using molecular diagnostic tools and a single genetic locus as marker for species identification. As there can be limitations in using a single genetic locus for epidemiological studies and genetic discrimination, the complementary use of a more variable locus will provide additional evidence to support the zoonotic exchange of hookworm species between humans and animals. In the present study, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) sequence of A. ceylanicum from positive human and animal fecal samples were determined and compared with published reference sequences. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that isolates of A. ceylanicum were divided into two clusters, one consisting 3 human isolates and the other comprising 19 isolates of human and animal origin from different geographical locations within Malaysia. The two groups of A. ceylanicum could be distinguished from one another through five fixed nucleotide differences at locations 891, 966, 1008, 1077 and 1083. The detection of genetically distinct groups and considerable level of genetic variation within the cox 1 sequence of A. ceylanicum might suggest potential haplotype-linked differences in zoonotic, epidemiological and pathobiological characteristics, a hypothesis that still needs further investigation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/enzymology
Ancylostoma/genetics
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Ancylostomiasis/veterinary
Electron Transport Complex IV/genetics
Genetic Variation
Mitochondrial Proteins/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma/isolation & purification
Animals
Asia
Asia, Southeastern
Cats
Cluster Analysis
DNA, Helminth/chemistry
DNA, Helminth/genetics
Dogs
Humans
Malaysia
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeography
Protein Subunits/genetics
Sequence Analysis, DNA
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Helminth); 0 (Mitochondrial Proteins); 0 (Protein Subunits); EC 1.9.3.1 (Electron Transport Complex IV)
[Em] Entry month:1403
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130916
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 1046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23891152
[Au] Autor:Nguyen JB; Pool CD; Wong CY; Treger RS; Williams DL; Cappello M; Lea WA; Simeonov A; Vermeire JJ; Modis Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
[Ti] Title:Peroxiredoxin-1 from the human hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum forms a stable oxidized decamer and is covalently inhibited by conoidin A.
[So] Source:Chem Biol;20(8):991-1001, 2013 Aug 22.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1301
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hookworms are parasitic nematodes that have a devastating impact on global health, particularly in developing countries. We report a biochemical and structural analysis of a peroxiredoxin from the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum, AcePrx-1. Peroxiredoxins provide antioxidant protection and act as signaling molecules and chaperones. AcePrx-1 is expressed in adult hookworms and can be inactivated by 2,3-bis(bromomethyl)quinoxaline-1,4-dioxide (conoidin A). Conoidin A inactivates AcePrx-1 by alkylating or crosslinking the catalytic cysteines, while maintaining the enzyme in the "locally unfolded" conformation. Irreversible oxidation of the resolving cysteine may contribute additional inhibitory activity. A crystal structure of oxidized AcePrx-1 reveals a disulfide-linked decamer. A helix macrodipole near the active site increases the reactivity of the catalytic cysteines to conoidin A. This work demonstrates the promise of conoidin compounds as probes to evaluate peroxiredoxins as drug targets in human parasites.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/enzymology
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Peroxiredoxins/antagonists & inhibitors
Peroxiredoxins/chemistry
Quinoxalines/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Sequence
Ancylostoma/chemistry
Animals
Catalytic Domain/drug effects
Crystallography, X-Ray
Humans
Models, Molecular
Molecular Sequence Data
Oxidation-Reduction/drug effects
Peroxiredoxins/metabolism
Protein Conformation
Protein Multimerization/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Quinoxalines); 0 (conoidin A); EC 1.11.1.15 (Peroxiredoxins)
[Em] Entry month:1402
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130826
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 22892069
[Au] Autor:Alkazmi LM; Behnke JM
[Ad] Address:School of Biology, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.
[Ti] Title:The mucosal response of hamsters exposed to weekly repeated infections with the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum.
[So] Source:J Helminthol;87(3):309-17, 2013 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1475-2697
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An experiment was carried out to assess mucosal changes in hamsters exposed to weekly repeated low-intensity infections with the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. The experiment included control groups of naïve, uninfected hamsters and groups that received a single-pulse primary infection. Changes in the intestinal architecture and in the density of inflammatory cells in the mucosa, including mast cells, goblet cells, Paneth cells and eosinophils were examined in relation to changes in hookworm burdens. As in the single-pulse primary infection, hamsters exposed to repeated infections responded with marked changes in the intestinal architecture and in mucosal populations of inflammatory cells. However, there were distinct differences in the kinetics of the responses to these two types of infection (primary single-pulse and repeated). The reduction in villous height and the increase in crypt depth in animals exposed to repeated infections were both initially slower but eventually equalled and exceeded the responses in hamsters given a chronic primary infection, despite the presence of fewer adult worms in the former. Similarly, changes in the mitotic figures of epithelial cells in the mucosa and the mast cell response were both initially slower and less intense in repeatedly infected hamsters, but eventually exceeded the response to primary infection. Furthermore, the eosinophil response was found to be initially greater in repeated infections and overall more persistent. In contrast, both goblet and Paneth cell responses were less marked in repeatedly infected animals compared to those carrying a primary infection. These results are discussed in the context of host protective resistance to infection with A. ceylanicum.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/immunology
Ancylostomiasis/immunology
Immunity, Mucosal
Intestinal Mucosa/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cricetinae
Disease Models, Animal
Eosinophils/immunology
Epithelial Cells/immunology
Female
Goblet Cells/immunology
Intestinal Mucosa/pathology
Mast Cells/immunology
Mesocricetus
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1402
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130725
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0022149X12000375

  4 / 1046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24431537
[Au] Autor:Indira R; Viveka Vardhani V
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar, Guntur, 522510 AP India.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of ancylostomiasis in people living in slum area, Philhousepet of Eluru, West Godavari District (Andhra Pradesh).
[So] Source:J Parasit Dis;37(1):29-34, 2013 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0971-7196
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hookworm infection was found in the slum area of Eluru, West Godavari District, A.P. which has scheduled caste population. Infection is related to different climatic conditions and socio-economic status of the population. The inhabitants are coolies in agricultural fields and household workers with a poor level of hygiene and sanitation. All the infected positive cases showed Ancylostoma duodenale infection. The prevalence of hookworm infection was 15.6, 17.9 and 14 % in children, 23.5, 27.9 and 20.5 % in adults during summer, rainy and winter seasons respectively. Single species infection was studied in three periods. Out of 264 faecal samples, 128 children (40 males, 32.5 %) and 136 adults (64 men, 25 % and 72 women, 30.5 %) showed helminthic infection in rainy season. Much variation is seen in the prevalence of disease in rainy and winter seasons in all the age groups. The infected individuals were treated with albendazole just after rainy season. Three weeks after antihelminthic treatment, the infection rate among them was lowered; health education also plays a role in reducing the % of infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1401
[Cu] Class update date: 140120
[Lr] Last revision date:140120
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140116
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12639-012-0125-0

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[PMID]: 23715191
[Au] Autor:Echeverry DM; Giraldo MI; Castaño JC
[Ad] Address:Grupo de Inmunología Molecular, Centro de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Facultad Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad del Quindío, Armenia, Colombia.
[Ti] Title:Prevalencia de helmintos intestinales en gatos domésticos del departamento del Quindío, Colombia. [Prevalence of intestinal helminths in cats in Quindío, Colombia].
[So] Source:Biomedica;32(3):430-6, 2012 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:0120-4157
[Cp] Country of publication:Colombia
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Diseases caused by helminths are widely distributed in the world and many of them are considered zoonoses in which pets play a major role in transmission to humans. OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of intestinal helminths was determined in cats in Quindío Province. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred twenty-one cats were characterized --data recorded included sex, age and body condition. Fecal samples were collected and processed using the modified Ritchie and modified Kato-Katz techniques to determine the presence of intestinal helminths. RESULTS: Of the 121 cats, 42.1%, (95% CI: 33.4-50.9) and 45.5% (95% CI: 36.6-54.3) were parasitized with at least one adult helminth species as evidenced by the presence of eggs in their fecal samples. Toxocara cati was the most prevalent parasite (Ritchie: 37.2%, Kato-Katz: 43%), followed by Ancylostoma spp. (Ritchie: 7.4%, Kato-Katz: 5.8%) and Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Ritchie: 0.82%). Sixty-five cats (53.7%) were females and 56 (46.3%) males; the prevalence of infection was similar in both sexes. Cats older than 4 years had the highest prevalence (81.8%) followed by those aged 1 to 4 years (48.8%) and by those under 1 year (28.6%). The majority of cats, 77.7%, were found to be in good body condition and this group had the lowest frequency of intestinal helminths with both techniques. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of intestinal helminths in domestic cats in Quindío was 43.8%; it is necessary to establish surveillance and prevention programs in the human and feline populations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cat Diseases/epidemiology
Helminthiasis, Animal/epidemiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/veterinary
Pets/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Age Factors
Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Ancylostomiasis/veterinary
Animals
Cat Diseases/parasitology
Cats/parasitology
Colombia/epidemiology
Disease Reservoirs
Feces/parasitology
Female
Helminthiasis, Animal/parasitology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/parasitology
Male
Metastrongyloidea/isolation & purification
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sampling Studies
Strongylida Infections/epidemiology
Strongylida Infections/parasitology
Strongylida Infections/veterinary
Toxocariasis/epidemiology
Toxocariasis/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1401
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130529
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 1046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24386558
[Au] Autor:Coêlho MD; Coêlho FA; de Mancilha IM
[Ad] Address:FUNVIC, Faculdade de Pindamonhangaba, Laboratório de Parasitologia, Rodovia Presidente Eurico Gaspar Dutra s/n-Km 99, Pinhão do Una, 12422-970 Pindamonhangaba, SP, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Probiotic therapy: a promising strategy for the control of canine hookworm.
[So] Source:J Parasitol Res;2013:430413, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:2090-0023
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Canis familiaris is a domestic animal which plays an important role as a pet; however, it is very likely to develop diseases characterized by high morbidity and mortality. In this sense, there are some Ancylostomatidae species that can lead to anemia, weight loss, and abdominal pain. Therefore, the treatment with allopathic drugs is essential for eliminating the parasitism. However, the increasing occurrence of resistance to allopathic treatments stimulates the search for new therapeutic inputs, among which the probiotics stand out and are able to positively alter the intestinal microbiota and exert immunomodulatory effect. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the applicability of using species of Lactobacillus (L. acidophilus ATCC 4536, L. plantarum ATCC 8014, and L. delbrueckii UFV H2B20) to control canine ancylostomiasis. A probiotic preparation containing 1 × 10(6) CFU of each strain was administered to 10 naturally infected animals, on alternate days for 28 days. It was observed that the treatment with the probiotic preparation led to a significant reduction in EPG of feces (88.83%/ P < 0.05), as well as an increase in leukocyte and lymphocyte counts, highlighting the potential use of Lactobacillus species in the control of canine ancylostomiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1401
[Cu] Class update date: 140107
[Lr] Last revision date:140107
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140103
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2013/430413

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[PMID]: 23990436
[Au] Autor:Wisniewski M; Jaros S; Baska P; Cappello M; Wedrychowicz H
[Ad] Address:Division of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, Department of Preclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland. marcin_wisniewski@sggw.pl
[Ti] Title:Ancylostoma ceylanicum metalloprotease 6 DNA vaccination induces partial protection against hookworm challenge infection.
[So] Source:Acta Parasitol;58(3):376-83, 2013 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1896-1851
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hookworms are blood feeding intestinal nematodes that infect more than 500 million people and cause iron deficiency anemia. Infected children suffer from physical and cognitive growth retardation. Because of potential anthelminthic drug resistance, the need for vaccine development is urgent. Numerous antigens have been tested in animal models as vaccines against hookworm infection, but there is no effective human vaccine. We cloned a cDNA encoding Ancylostoma ceylanicum metalloprotease 6 (Acemep-6). Ace-MEP-6 is a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 101.87 kDa and based on computational analysis it is very likely to be engaged in food processing via hemoglobin digestion. Groups of hamsters were immunized with an Ace-mep-6 cDNA vaccine, either once or three times. Animals that were administered one dose developed high resistance (80%, p < 0.01) against challenge infection, whereas triple immunization resulted in no worm burden reduction. These results suggest that DNA vaccines can be powerful tools in ancylostomiasis control, although the mechanisms through which protection is conferred remain unclear.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.2478/s11686-013-0151-9

  8 / 1046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23764662
[Au] Autor:Cediel N; Villamil LC; Romero J; Renteria L; De Meneghi D
[Ad] Address:Dipartimento di Scienze Veterinarie, Università degli Studi di Torino, Turin, Italy. swasanata@gmail.com,
[Ti] Title:Setting priorities for surveillance, prevention, and control of zoonoses in Bogotá, Colombia.
[So] Source:Rev Panam Salud Publica;33(5):316-24, 2013 May.
[Is] ISSN:1680-5348
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To establish priorities for zoonoses surveillance, prevention, and control in Bogotá, Colombia. METHODS: A Delphi panel of experts in veterinary and human medicine was conducted using a validated prioritization method to assess the importance of 32 selected zoonoses. This exercise was complemented by a questionnaire survey, using the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) methodology, administered in 19 districts of Bogotá from September 2009 to April 2010 to an at-risk population (workers at veterinary clinics; pet shops; butcher shops; and traditional food markets that sell poultry, meat, cheese, and eggs). A risk indicator based on level of knowledge about zoonoses was constructed using categorical principal component and logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Twelve experts participated in the Delphi panel. The diseases scored as highest priority were: influenza A(H1N1), salmonellosis, Escherichia coli infection, leptospirosis, and rabies. The diseases scored as lowest priority were: ancylostomiasis, scabies, ringworm, and trichinellosis. A total of 535 questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Respondents claimed to have had scabies (21%), fungi (8%), brucellosis (8%), and pulicosis (8%). Workers with the most limited knowledge on zoonoses and therefore the highest health risk were those who 1) did not have a professional education, 2) had limited or no zoonoses prevention training, and 3) worked in Usme, Bosa, or Ciudad Bolívar districts. CONCLUSIONS: According to the experts, influenza A(H1N1) was the most important zoonoses. Rabies, leptospirosis, brucellosis, and toxoplasmosis were identified as priority diseases by both the experts and the exposed workers. This is the first prioritization exercise focused on zoonoses surveillance, prevention, and control in Colombia. These results could be used to guide decision-making for resource allocation in public health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 1046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23494155
[Au] Autor:Dias SR; Cunha DE; da Silva SM; Dos Santos HA; Fujiwara RT; Rabelo EM
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos 6627, Campus Pampulha, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil. silviarcdias@yahoo.com.br
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of parasitological and immunological aspects of acute infection by Ancylostoma caninum and Ancylostoma braziliense in mixed-breed dogs.
[So] Source:Parasitol Res;112(6):2151-7, 2013 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1955
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This study compared the course of infection by Ancylostoma caninum and Ancylostoma braziliense in mixed-breed dogs infected with L3 larvae. Dogs infected with A. caninum eliminated more eggs than did those infected with A. braziliense. A total of 38 % of A. caninum and 44 % of A. braziliense larvae were recovered as adult worms. There were no marked clinical abnormalities in dogs with either infection. A. caninum was associated with anemia and an increased number of circulating neutrophils, whereas infection with A. braziliense led to a decrease in the number of leukocytes. The humoral response against excreted and secreted antigens from adult worms was more sensitive and specific than the response induced with the crude antigen. No immune response was observed for either crude or excreted-secreted (ES) antigens from larvae of either species. A nonspecific response against the crude antigen of A. braziliense was found at 0 and 7 days postinfection and maintained throughout the infection period. However, antibody titers against ES antigens were elevated in A. caninum infection at patency and death, showing that this antigen has a higher specificity. The immune response elicited by infection with A. braziliense in dogs has not been described previously. No significant differences were observed in the infection processes of the two Ancylostoma species, except for the higher number of eggs eliminated from dogs infected with A. caninum, which may indicate a better evolutionary adaptation of the parasite to its host in comparison with A. braziliense.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostomiasis/pathology
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Dog Diseases/pathology
Dog Diseases/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma/pathogenicity
Ancylostomiasis/complications
Ancylostomiasis/immunology
Anemia/etiology
Animals
Antibodies, Helminth/blood
Disease Models, Animal
Dogs
Feces/parasitology
Leukocytosis/etiology
Neutropenia/etiology
Parasite Egg Count
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Helminth)
[Em] Entry month:1312
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130527
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00436-013-3370-y

  10 / 1046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23556013
[Au] Autor:Keiser J; Tritten L; Silbereisen A; Speich B; Adelfio R; Vargas M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Parasitology and Infection Biology, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland. jennifer.keiser@unibas.ch
[Ti] Title:Activity of oxantel pamoate monotherapy and combination chemotherapy against Trichuris muris and hookworms: revival of an old drug.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;7(3):e2119, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: It is widely recognized that only a handful of drugs are available against soil-transmitted helminthiasis, all of which are characterized by a low efficacy against Trichuris trichiura, when administered as single doses. The re-evaluation of old, forgotten drugs is a promising strategy to identify alternative anthelminthic drug candidates or drug combinations. METHODOLOGY: We studied the activity of the veterinary drug oxantel pamoate against Trichuris muris, Ancylostoma ceylanicum and Necator americanus in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the dose-effect of oxantel pamoate combined with albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin was studied against T. muris in vitro and additive or synergistic combinations were followed up in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We calculated an ED50 of 4.7 mg/kg for oxantel pamoate against T. muris in mice. Combinations of oxantel pamoate with pyrantel pamoate behaved antagonistically in vitro (combination index (CI) = 2.53). Oxantel pamoate combined with levamisole, albendazole or ivermectin using ratios based on their ED50s revealed antagonistic effects in vivo (CI = 1.27, 1.90 and 1.27, respectively). A highly synergistic effect (CI = 0.15) was observed when oxantel pamoate-mebendazole was administered to T. muris-infected mice. Oxantel pamoate (10 mg/kg) lacked activity against Ancylostoma ceylanicum and Necator americanus in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study confirms the excellent trichuricidal properties of oxantel pamoate. Since the drug lacks activity against hookworms it is necessary to combine oxantel pamoate with a partner drug with anti-hookworm properties. Synergistic effects were observed for oxantel pamoate-mebendazole, hence this combination should be studied in more detail. Since, of the standard drugs, albendazole has the highest efficacy against hookworms, additional investigations on the combination effect of oxantel pamoate-albendazole should be launched.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostomiasis/drug therapy
Anthelmintics/administration & dosage
Necatoriasis/drug therapy
Pyrantel Pamoate/analogs & derivatives
Trichuriasis/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma/drug effects
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Animals
Anthelmintics/pharmacology
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Synergism
Drug Therapy, Combination/methods
Female
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Necator americanus/drug effects
Necatoriasis/parasitology
Parasitic Sensitivity Tests
Pyrantel Pamoate/administration & dosage
Pyrantel Pamoate/pharmacology
Treatment Outcome
Trichuriasis/parasitology
Trichuris/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); 81BK194Z5M (Pyrantel Pamoate); UPY1D732T0 (oxantel pamoate)
[Em] Entry month:1308
[Cu] Class update date: 131121
[Lr] Last revision date:131121
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130404
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002119


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