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[PMID]: 25254370
[Au] Autor:Pacanaro CP; Dias SR; Serafim LR; Costa MP; Aguilar E; Paes PR; Alvarez-Leite JI; Rabelo EM
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil....
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of biochemical, hematological and parasitological parameters of protein-deficient hamsters infected with Ancylostoma ceylanicum.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;8(9):e3184, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hookworms infect millions of people worldwide and can cause severe clinical symptoms in their hosts. Prospective cohort studies in Brazil show high rates of hookworm reinfection in malnourished children compared to well-nourished children, despite previous treatment. Additionally, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections can worsen the nutritional status of affected populations. Therefore, this study aims to clarify the effects of host malnutrition during Ancylostoma ceylanicum infection and how this infection affects host physiological parameters using a hamster model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hamsters were divided into four experimental groups: normal diet or low-protein diet (also referred to as "malnourished") and A. ceylanicum infection or no infection. More severe pathogenesis was observed in the infected malnourished group, as demonstrated by significant decreases in the hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte number and packed-cell volume compared to the non-infected malnourished group. Greater numbers of adult parasites and eggs were observed in the malnourished group compared to the control group; however, the oviposition rate was lower in the malnourished group. In general, greater values of total lipids were observed in malnourished animals compared to control animals, including lipids excreted in the stool. CONCLUSIONS: In this work, we have demonstrated that animals fed an isocaloric low-protein diet presented more severe pathogenesis when infected with A. ceylanicum. The increased lipid concentration in the liver and blood is related to the conversion of the excess carbohydrate into fatty acids that increase the concentration of triglycerides in general. Triglycerides were excreted in the feces, indicating that infection associated with malnutrition caused a greater loss of these molecules for this group of animals and confirming the hypothesis that both nutrition and infection are responsible for the malabsorption syndrome. Taken together, the results found in this work confirm the hypothesis that the nutritional condition of the host greatly influences the course of the infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma
Ancylostomiasis/metabolism
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Protein Deficiency/metabolism
Protein Deficiency/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostomiasis/blood
Animals
Blood Proteins/metabolism
Cricetinae
Diet, Protein-Restricted
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Lipids/blood
Protein Deficiency/blood
Random Allocation
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Proteins); 0 (Lipids)
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140926
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003184

  2 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25291046
[Au] Autor:Sayasone S; Utzinger J; Akkhavong K; Odermatt P
[Ad] Address:National Institute of Public Health, Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel, Switzerland....
[Ti] Title:Multiparasitism and intensity of helminth infections in relation to symptoms and nutritional status among children: a cross-sectional study in southern Lao People's Democratic Republic.
[So] Source:Acta Trop;141(Pt B):322-31, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1873-6254
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The occurrence and spatial distribution of intestinal helminth infection in children is fairly well understood. However, knowledge on how helminth infections govern intestinal morbidity is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess and quantify the relationship between single and multiple species helminth infection with clinical and self-reported morbidity indicators and nutritional status in Champasack province, southern Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). A random sample of 1313 children, aged 6 months to 12 years, from villages in nine rural districts were enrolled and examined for helminth infection using duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears. Morbidity was assessed by self-reported symptoms, coupled with clinical examination and appraisal of nutritional status and anaemia. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was employed to study associations between helminth infection and morbidity indicators and anaemia. We found considerable morbidity among the surveyed children, including hepatomegaly (13.7%), pale conjunctiva (13.2%) and abdominal pain (10.4%). Anaemia was recorded in 60.4% of the children, whilst signs of stunting and low body mass index (BMI) were observed in 49.8% and 33.3% of the surveyed children, respectively. Hookworm and Opisthorchis viverrini were the predominant helminth species with prevalences of 51.0% and 43.3%, respectively. The prevalence of Schistosoma mekongi in the surveyed children was 5.6%. Multiple species helminth infections were recorded in 40.4% of the study cohort. Morbidity was associated with specific helminth species infection (e.g. S. mekongi with hepatomegaly; adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 9.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.07-43.51) and multiparasitism (e.g. two or more helminth species with abdominal pain; aOR: 2.40, 95% CI: 1.46-3.93). Anaemia was associated with hookworm infection (aOR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.16-2.34) and multiparasitism (aOR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.18-2.29). Low BMI was associated with O. viverrini infection (aOR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.14-2.49) and multiparasitism (aOR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.01-2.00). The multiple strong associations reported here between helminth infections (single or multiple species) and intestinal morbidity among children in rural parts of southern Lao PDR call for concerted efforts to control helminth infections, which in turn might improve children's health and development.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia/epidemiology
Coinfection/epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/epidemiology
Helminthiasis/epidemiology
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Thinness/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostomatoidea
Ancylostomiasis/complications
Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Ancylostomiasis/physiopathology
Anemia/etiology
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feces
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/etiology
Helminthiasis/complications
Helminthiasis/physiopathology
Helminths
Hookworm Infections/complications
Hookworm Infections/epidemiology
Hookworm Infections/physiopathology
Humans
Infant
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/complications
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/physiopathology
Laos/epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Opisthorchiasis/complications
Opisthorchiasis/epidemiology
Opisthorchiasis/physiopathology
Opisthorchis
Prevalence
Rural Population/statistics & numerical data
Schistosomiasis/epidemiology
Schistosomiasis/physiopathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141216
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26421808
[Au] Autor:Nikolay B; Mwandawiro CS; Kihara JH; Okoyo C; Cano J; Mwanje MT; Sultani H; Alusala D; Turner HC; Teti C; Garn J; Freeman MC; Allen E; Anderson RM; Pullan RL; Njenga SM; Brooker SJ
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom....
[Ti] Title:Understanding Heterogeneity in the Impact of National Neglected Tropical Disease Control Programmes: Evidence from School-Based Deworming in Kenya.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;9(9):e0004108, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The implementation of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) treatment programmes occurs in varied environmental, social and economic contexts. Programme impact will be influenced by factors that affect the reduction in the prevalence and intensity of infections following treatment, as well as the subsequent rate of reinfection. To better understand the heterogeneity of programme impact and its underlying reasons, we investigated the influence of contextual factors on reduction in STH infection as part of the national school based deworming (SBD) programme in Kenya. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data on the prevalence and intensity of infection were collected within the monitoring and evaluation component of the SBD programme at baseline and after delivery of two annual treatment rounds in 153 schools in western Kenya. Using a framework that considers STH epidemiology and transmission dynamics, capacity to deliver treatment, operational feasibility and financial capacity, data were assembled at both school and district (county) levels. Geographic heterogeneity of programme impact was assessed by descriptive and spatial analyses. Factors associated with absolute reductions of Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworm infection prevalence and intensity were identified using mixed effects linear regression modelling adjusting for baseline infection levels. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The reduction in prevalence and intensity of A. lumbricoides and hookworms varied significantly by county and within counties by school. Multivariable analysis of factors associated with programme impact showed that absolute A. lumbricoides reductions varied by environmental conditions and access to improved sanitation at schools or within the community. Larger reduction in prevalence and intensity of hookworms were found in schools located within areas with higher community level access to improved sanitation and within counties with higher economic and health service delivery indicator scores. CONCLUSIONS: The study identifies factors associated with the impact of school-based deworming and in particular highlights how access to water, sanitation and hygiene and environmental conditions influence the impact of deworming programmes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antinematodal Agents/administration & dosage
Neglected Diseases/therapy
Nematode Infections/epidemiology
Nematode Infections/therapy
Program Evaluation
School Health Services/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Ancylostomiasis/therapy
Ancylostomiasis/transmission
Animals
Ascariasis/epidemiology
Ascariasis/therapy
Ascariasis/transmission
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Kenya/epidemiology
Neglected Diseases/epidemiology
Prevalence
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Trichuriasis/epidemiology
Trichuriasis/therapy
Water/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antinematodal Agents); 059QF0KO0R (Water)
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Cu] Class update date: 151003
[Lr] Last revision date:151003
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151001
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004108

  4 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25618132
[Au] Autor:George S; Kaliappan SP; Kattula D; Roy S; Geldhof P; Kang G; Vercruysse J; Levecke B
[Ad] Address:Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Merelbeke, Belgium Division of Gastrointestinal Sciences, Christian Medical College, Vellore, India....
[Ti] Title:Identification of Ancylostoma ceylanicum in children from a tribal community in Tamil Nadu, India using a semi-nested PCR-RFLP tool.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;109(4):283-5, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: It is generally assumed that hookworm infections in humans are caused by Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. However, previous studies have also reported the presence of the animal hookworm A. ceylanicum in human stools. METHODS: We determined hookworm infections in children in a tribal community in Tamil Nadu, India, using a semi-nested PCR-RFLP approach. RESULTS: The results indicate that human species account for a majority of the hookworm infections (N. americanus 39/41 [95%]; A. duodenale 6/41 [15%]), whereas the animal hookworm A. ceylanicum only accounts for a minority of the infections (5%; 2/41). CONCLUSIONS: The results emphasize the need to consider zoonotic ancylostomiasis while developing strategies to control hookworm infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/isolation & purification
Ancylostomiasis/diagnosis
Feces/parasitology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma/genetics
Ancylostoma/pathogenicity
Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Ancylostomiasis/prevention & control
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Reservoirs
Dogs
Humans
India/epidemiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Species Specificity
Zoonoses/epidemiology
Zoonoses/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150315
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trv001

  5 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26625923
[Au] Autor:Silva FT; Dias MO; Pinto Ada C; Santos NP
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, , fabio.chemistry@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:"Pós de doliarina e ferro": um dos remédios importantes da Farmácia Peckolt. ["Doliarina and iron powder": an important medicine at Peckolt Pharmacy].
[So] Source:Hist Cienc Saude Manguinhos;22(4):1427-39, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4758
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por
[Ab] Abstract:The pharmacist Theodoro Peckolt was one of the most important figures in the history of the chemistry of natural Brazilian products. Like other nineteenth-century pharmacists in Brazil, he developed formulations and sold them at his pharmacy in Rio de Janeiro, and these enjoyed great prestige in the eyes both of the public and the medical community. The article discusses the relation between the illness originally called "opilação" (ancylostomiasis, or hookworm) and nineteenth-century treatment. It focuses especially on Peckolt Pharmacy's "Doliarina and iron powder," a formulation extracted from the Ficus gomelleira rubber plant. One of the article's goals is to use modern methods to analyze Ficus gomelleira and identify the chemical composition of the drug.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Js] Journal subset:QIS
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25606735
[Au] Autor:Korndörfer AP
[Ad] Address:Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos.
[Ti] Title:Para além do combate à ancilostomíase: o diário do médico norte-americano Alan Gregg. [Looking beyond the campaign to eradicate ancylostomiasis: the diary of the American physician Alan Gregg].
[So] Source:Hist Cienc Saude Manguinhos;21(4):1457-66, 2014 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4758
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por
[Ab] Abstract:Between 1916 and 1923, the Federal District and 11 Brazilian states entered into cooperation agreements with the International Health Board of the Rockefeller Foundation to combat a rural endemic disease, namely ancylostomiasis. This paper presents the diary of Alan Gregg, one of the American physicians who worked in Brazil from 1919 to 1922. An interesting source to discuss issues relating to the history of public health in Brazil, in addition to information about the activities to combat ancylostomiasis developed by the Rockefeller Foundation in the country, the diary of the physician presents his impressions concerning nature, culture, politics and society in Brazil. In the diary excerpts presented here, however, aspects related to the professional activities performed by Gregg are prioritized.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Js] Journal subset:QIS
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26245120
[Au] Autor:Guo AY; Lin XM; Zhang YQ; Wu H
[Ti] Title:[The Levels of IL-4, IL-9, and IgE in Patients Infected with Intestinal Helminths and their Clinical Values].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Ji Sheng Chong Xue Yu Ji Sheng Chong Bing Za Zhi;33(2):110-3, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1000-7423
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the serum levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-9 (IL-9), and immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the patients infected with intestinal helminths, and study their relationship to the clinical symptoms or species of the helminths. METHODS: This study was carried out in the Department of Paediatrics, Henan Provincial People's Hospital from January 2010 to July 2014. The blood samples were collected from 55 infected patients. Among the 55 cases, 18 cases (32.7%) were with ascaris infection, 8 cases (14.5%) of hookworm infection, 7 cases (12.7%) of whipworm infection, and 22 cases (40%) of pinworm infection. ELISA were used to measure the levels of IL-4, IL-9, and IgE in peripheral blood samples from the patients and 15 healthy volunteers. The relationship between the concentration of the cytokines and clinical symptoms or species of the parasites was analyzed. RESULTS: The serum levels of IL-4, IL-9, and IgE in infection group were (157.42 ± 41) pg/ml, (59.9 ± 21.7) pg/ml, and (316.6 ± 129) IU/ml, respectively, which were higher than that of the healthy control[ IL-4 (39.01 ± .5) pg/ml, IL-9 (21.3 ± 12.5) pg/m, IgE (127.7 ± 57.6) IU/ml] (P > 0.01). After treatment by albendazole in the infection group, the level of IL-4, IL-9, and IgE decreased to (98.1 ± 41.7) pg/ml, (38.7 ± 14.1) pg/ml, and (253.1 ± 94.0) IU/ml, respectively, but still higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). IL-9 level in patients with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage was (76.1 ± 23.5) pg/ml, which was higher than that of those with abdominal discomfort or disruption to bowel habits [(54.3 ± 22.1) g/ml] (P < 0.05), but lower than that of those with allergic dermatitis [(108.5 ± 33.4) pg/ml] (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the levels of IL-4 and IgE among the above three groups. The level of IL-9 in patients infected with pinworms was (120.3 ± 41.0) pg/ml, which was higher than that of ascaris infection group [(90.1 ± 29.7) pg/ml], hookworm infection group [(77.3 ± 18.3) pg/ml], and whipworm infection group [(62.5 ± 24.3) pg/ml] (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the serum level of IL-9 between ascaris infection group and hookworm infection group (P > 0.05), whereas the IL-9 level in ascaris infection group and hookworm infection group was higher than that of whipworm infection group [(62.5 ± 24.3) pg/ ml] (P < 0.01). There were no significant difference in the serum level of IL-4 and IgE among the patients infected with the species of different helminthes (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The levels of IL-4, IgE, and IL-9 are considerably related with intestinal helminth infection, while IL-9 level varied with different helminth species and clinical symptoms.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Helminthiasis
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostomiasis
Animals
Child
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Immunoglobulin E
Interleukin-4
Interleukin-9
Trichuriasis
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (IL4 protein, human); 0 (IL9 protein, human); 0 (Interleukin-9); 207137-56-2 (Interleukin-4); 37341-29-0 (Immunoglobulin E)
[Em] Entry month:1511
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150806
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25730766
[Au] Autor:Schwarz EM; Hu Y; Antoshechkin I; Miller MM; Sternberg PW; Aroian RV
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA....
[Ti] Title:The genome and transcriptome of the zoonotic hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum identify infection-specific gene families.
[So] Source:Nat Genet;47(4):416-22, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1546-1718
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hookworms infect over 400 million people, stunting and impoverishing them. Sequencing hookworm genomes and finding which genes they express during infection should help in devising new drugs or vaccines against hookworms. Unlike other hookworms, Ancylostoma ceylanicum infects both humans and other mammals, providing a laboratory model for hookworm disease. We determined an A. ceylanicum genome sequence of 313 Mb, with transcriptomic data throughout infection showing expression of 30,738 genes. Approximately 900 genes were upregulated during early infection in vivo, including ASPRs, a cryptic subfamily of activation-associated secreted proteins (ASPs). Genes downregulated during early infection included ion channels and G protein-coupled receptors; this downregulation was observed in both parasitic and free-living nematodes. Later, at the onset of heavy blood feeding, C-lectin genes were upregulated along with genes for secreted clade V proteins (SCVPs), encoding a previously undescribed protein family. These findings provide new drug and vaccine targets and should help elucidate hookworm pathogenesis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostoma/genetics
Ancylostoma/pathogenicity
Ancylostomiasis/genetics
Genome, Helminth
Transcriptome
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostomatoidea/genetics
Ancylostomiasis/parasitology
Animals
Base Sequence
Female
Humans
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
Multigene Family
Phylogeny
Species Specificity
Zoonoses/genetics
Zoonoses/parasitology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1506
[Cu] Class update date: 151028
[Lr] Last revision date:151028
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150327
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/ng.3237

  9 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25745677
[Ti] Title:Soil-transmitted helminthiases: number of children treated in 2013.
[So] Source:Wkly Epidemiol Rec;90(10):89-94, 2015 Mar 6.
[Is] ISSN:0049-8114
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng; fre
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ancylostomiasis/prevention & control
Anthelmintics/therapeutic use
Ascariasis/prevention & control
Necatoriasis/prevention & control
Primary Prevention/statistics & numerical data
Trichuriasis/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Albendazole/therapeutic use
Ancylostoma
Ancylostomiasis/transmission
Animals
Ascariasis/transmission
Ascaris lumbricoides
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual/statistics & numerical data
Global Health
Humans
Infant
Mebendazole/therapeutic use
Necator americanus
Necatoriasis/transmission
Soil/parasitology
Trichuriasis/transmission
Trichuris
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); 0 (Soil); 81G6I5V05I (Mebendazole); F4216019LN (Albendazole)
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150306
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 1079 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25521874
[Au] Autor:Gonzalez AR; Fee E
[Ad] Address:Ana Rita Gonzalez is with Policy Wisdom LLC, Miami, FL. Elizabeth Fee is with the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
[Ti] Title:Anemia in Puerto Rico at the turn of the twentieth century.
[So] Source:Am J Public Health;105(2):272-3, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1541-0048
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia/history
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Ancylostoma
Ancylostomiasis/complications
Ancylostomiasis/epidemiology
Ancylostomiasis/history
Anemia/epidemiology
Anemia/etiology
Anemia/prevention & control
Animals
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Public Health/history
Puerto Rico/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:BIOGRAPHY; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; PORTRAITS
[Ps] Personal name as subject:Ashford BK
[Em] Entry month:1504
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302225


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