Database : MEDLINE
Search on : anger [Words]
References found : 15409 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1541 go to page                         

  1 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524803
[Au] Autor:Del Cueto J; Møller BL; Dicenta F; Sánchez-Pérez R
[Ad] Address:Department of Plant Breeding, CEBAS-CSIC, P.O. Box 164, 30100 Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Murcia, Spain; University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Science, Plant Biochemistry Laboratory, DK-1871 Copenhagen C, Denmark; VILLUM Research Center for Plant Plasticity, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:ß-Glucosidase activity in almond seeds.
[So] Source:Plant Physiol Biochem;126:163-172, 2017 Dec 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2690
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Almond bitterness is the most important trait for breeding programs since bitter-kernelled seedlings are usually discarded. Amygdalin and its precursor prunasin are hydrolyzed by specific enzymes called ß-glucosidases. In order to better understand the genetic control of almond bitterness, some studies have shown differences in the location of prunasin hydrolases (PH, the ß-glucosidase that degrades prunasin) in sweet and bitter genotypes. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterize different PHs in sweet- and bitter-kernelled almonds to determine whether differences in their genomic or protein sequences are responsible for the sweet or bitter taste of their seeds. RNA was extracted from the tegument, nucellus and cotyledon of one sweet (Lauranne) and two bitter (D05-187 and S3067) almond genotypes throughout fruit ripening. Sequences of nine positive Phs were then obtained from all of the genotypes by RT-PCR and cloning. These clones, from mid ripening stage, were expressed in a heterologous system in tobacco plants by agroinfiltration. The PH activity was detected using the Feigl-Anger method and quantifying the hydrogen cyanide released with prunasin as substrate. Furthermore, ß-glucosidase activity was detected by Fast Blue BB salt and Umbelliferyl method. Differences at the sequence level (SNPs) and in the activity assays were detected, although no correlation with bitterness was found.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29476800
[Au] Autor:Braden A; Musher-Eizenman D; Watford T; Emley E
[Ti] Title:Eating when depressed, anxious, bored, or happy: Are emotional eating types associated with unique psychological and physical health correlates?
[So] Source:Appetite;125:410-417, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The majority of research on emotional eating has examined general emotional eating, to the exclusion of more distinct emotions such as boredom and positive emotions. The current study aimed to examine whether specific types of emotional eating (i.e., eating in response to depression (EE-D), anxiety/anger (EE-A), boredom (EE-B), and positive emotions (EE-P)) were related to a range of psychological (i.e., global psychological well-being, eating disorder symptoms, emotion regulation) and physical health variables. A sample of adults (n = 189) with overweight/obesity were recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Participants self-reported height and weight and completed a battery of questionnaires. Correlational analyses showed that more frequent EE-D, EE-A, and EE-B were related to poorer psychological well-being, greater eating disorder symptoms, and more difficulties with emotion regulation. EE-P was not significantly related to outcome variables. In regression analyses, eating in response to depression (EE-D) was the type of emotional eating most closely related to psychological well-being, eating disorder symptoms, and emotion regulation difficulties. Exploratory analyses revealed associations between EE-D, EE-A, and EE-B and facets of emotion regulation and specific disordered eating symptoms. Findings suggest that unique patterns exist between specific types of emotional eating and psychological outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29522902
[Au] Autor:Koltai J; Bierman A; Schieman S
[Ad] Address:University of Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: jon.koltai@mail.utoronto.ca.
[Ti] Title:Financial circumstances, mastery, and mental health: Taking unobserved time-stable influences into account.
[So] Source:Soc Sci Med;202:108-116, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5347
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This paper examines whether low income and subjective financial strain are associated with mental health, as well as whether mastery weakens this association. We analyze three waves of a large sample of Canadians and utilize random and fixed effects regression strategies to assess bias introduced by unobserved time-stable confounders. In random effects models, both low income and subjective financial strain are associated with distress and anger. In fixed effects models that control for all time-stable confounders, the effect of low income is reduced to non-significance for both outcomes. The effect of subjective strain is also reduced in fixed effects models, but remained statistically significant. Sobel tests indicated that the effect of subjective strain on mental health is transmitted through mastery, but this indirect path is modest in magnitude. When interactions are tested, mastery weakens the association between subjective strain and distress, and this effect is robust to the influence of time-stable controls, but mastery does not buffer the subjective strain-anger relationship in either random or fixed-effects models. Finally, moving below the low income threshold increases anger for low mastery individuals, but seems to reduce anger when moving below the low income threshold is coupled with increases in mastery. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the importance of assessing the influence of unobserved time-stable confounders in stress research. Further, discrepancies in the moderating role of mastery reinforce calls for the assessment of multiple outcomes in mental health research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29431926
[Au] Autor:Kalaev VN; Nechaeva MS
[Ti] Title:[The study of the frequency of buccal epithelium cells with nuclear in athletes in dependence on the place got in the competition].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(10):992-7, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:Cytogenetic homeostasis ofathletes involved in hand-to-hand armyfighting, depending on the outcome of the fight and the level of aggressiveness has been studied. Status of the genetic apparatus in athletes was evaluated in buccal epithelium with the use of micronucleus test, which is widely usedfor the determination of the influence of various factors on the genetic stability of the organism. Psychological testing of athletes was executed with the use of Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory scale, Bass-Darky questionnaire for the diagnostics of aggression and hostile reactions, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire test for the evaluation ofpsychic conditions and method of U.P. Ilyin and P.A. Kovalev for the identification of the propensity to conflictness and aggressiveness (positive and negative) as the personal characteristics. The place taken by the athlete on the competition was shown to have an impact on the frequency of buccal epithelium cells with nuclear abnormalities (micronuclei, perinuclear vacuoles, notches, protrusions "tongue" and "broken egg"). Losers have nuclear aberrations more than winners. At that in athletes with higher aggressiveness and its attendant psychological characteristics the influence of the outcome of the competition on the number of cells with aberrations core is more pronounced.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aggression
Athletic Performance
Martial Arts
Micronucleus Tests/methods
Mouth Mucosa/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Aggression/physiology
Aggression/psychology
Athletes/psychology
Athletic Performance/physiology
Athletic Performance/psychology
Cytogenetic Analysis/methods
Humans
Male
Martial Arts/physiology
Martial Arts/psychology
Psychological Tests
Statistics as Topic
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29520559
[Au] Autor:Palandri F; Benevolo G; Iurlo A; Abruzzese E; Carella AM; Paoli C; Palumbo GA; Bonifacio M; Cilloni D; Andriani A; Guarini A; Turri D; Elli EM; Falcone A; Anaclerico B; Musto P; Di Renzo N; Tiribelli M; Zambello R; Spinosa C; Ricco A; Raucci L; Martino B; Annunziata M; Pascale S; Liberati AM; La Nasa G; Maffioli M; Breccia M; Pugliese N; Betti S; Giglio G; Cappuccio A; Reale L
[Ad] Address:Seràgnoli Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Life for patients with myelofibrosis: the physical, emotional and financial impact, collected using narrative medicine-Results from the Italian 'Back to Life' project.
[So] Source:Qual Life Res;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1573-2649
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Myelofibrosis (MF) is a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm characterised by an aggressive clinical course, with disabling symptoms and reduced survival. Patients experience a severely impaired quality of life and their families face the upheaval of daily routines and high disease-related financial costs. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of Italian patients and their caregivers about living with MF and the burden of illness associated with MF. METHODS: A quali-quantitative questionnaire and a prompted written narrative survey were administered to patients affected by primary or post-essential thrombocythemia/post-polycythaemia vera MF and their primary caregiver in 35 Italian haematological centres. RESULTS: In total, 287 questionnaires were returned by patients and 98 by caregivers, with 215 and 62, respectively, including the narrative. At the time of diagnosis, the most commonly expressed emotional states of patients were fear, distress and anger, confirming the difficulty of this phase. A high level of emotional distress was also reported by caregivers. Along the pathway of care, the ability to cope with the disease differed according to the quality of care received. The mean cost to each patient attributable to MF was estimated as €12,466 per year, with an estimated average annual cost of loss of income of €7774 per patient and €4692 per caregiver. CONCLUSIONS: Better understanding of the personal life of MF patients and their families could improve the relationships between health workers and patients, resulting in better focused healthcare pathways and more effective financial support to maintain patients in their social roles.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11136-018-1827-2

  6 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Clinical Trials Registry
Full text

[PMID]: 29504780
[Au] Autor:Dermody SS; McClernon FJ; Benowitz N; Luo X; Tidey JW; Smith TT; Vandrey R; Hatsukami D; Donny EC
[Ad] Address:Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
[Ti] Title:Effects of reduced nicotine content cigarettes on individual withdrawal symptoms over time and during abstinence.
[So] Source:Exp Clin Psychopharmacol;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1936-2293
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has initiated a public dialogue about reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes. A reduced-nicotine standard could increase withdrawal symptoms among current smokers. We examined the impact of switching smokers to cigarettes that varied in nicotine content on withdrawal symptoms over 6 weeks. A secondary analysis (N = 839) of a 10-site, double-blind clinical trial of nontreatment-seeking smokers was completed. Participants were instructed to smoke study cigarettes, containing 0.4 to 15.8 mg of nicotine/g of tobacco, for 6 weeks and were then abstinent overnight. Using latent growth curves, trajectories of individual withdrawal symptoms were compared between the reduced nicotine content (RNC) conditions and a normal nicotine content (NNC) condition. Path analyses compared symptoms after overnight abstinence. Relative to NNC cigarettes, participants smoking RNC cigarettes had increased anger/irritability/frustration and increased appetite/weight gain during the initial weeks, but the symptoms resolved by Week 6. Individuals who were biochemically verified as adherent with using only the 0.4 mg/g cigarettes had higher sadness levels (Cohen's d = .40) at Week 6 compared with the NNC condition, although symptoms were mild. After a post-Week 6 overnight abstinence challenge, some RNC conditions relative to NNC condition exhibited reduced withdrawal. Individuals who were biochemically confirmed as adherent to the lowest nicotine condition experienced only mild and transient symptom elevations. Thus, a reduced-nicotine standard for cigarettes produced a relatively mild and temporary increase in withdrawal among nontreatment-seeking smokers (ClinicalTrials.gov No. NCT01681875). (PsycINFO Database Record
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1037/pha0000179

  7 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29393692
[Au] Autor:Winter L; Moriarty HJ; Short TH
[Ad] Address:a Philadelphia Research and Education Foundation , Corporal Michael C. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center , Philadelphia , PA , USA.
[Ti] Title:Beyond anger: emotion regulation and social connectedness in veterans with traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Brain Inj;32(5):593-599, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1362-301X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often present with emotion dysregulation. Most TBI rehabilitation has addressed this impairment primarily in relation to anger, irritability and aggressiveness. Yet, emotion regulation (ER) may have broader ramifications for psychological well-being. The present study examined ER's association to several aspects of social connectedness. RESEARCH DESIGN: Cross-sectional study Methods and procedures: 83 veterans with TBI who were outpatients at a VA medical rehabilitation service were interviewed in their homes. A 5-item ER subscale, drawn from the Patient Competency Rating Scale, was subjected to psychometric analysis and examined as a predictor of five social connectedness measures: community reintegration (CR), interpersonal functioning, quality of relationship with key family members and social role limitations due to physical problems and due to emotional problems. Sociodemographic, military and medical information was also collected. MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS: The ER subscale showed good psychometric properties. ER contributed significantly to CR, interpersonal functioning and limitations in social roles. This underscores ER's role in social connectedness among veterans with TBI. CONCLUSIONS: Impairments in ER should be regarded as a risk factor for poor interpersonal outcomes, a target for mental health treatment and a focus for interventions aimed at improving psychological well-being in TBI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1080/02699052.2018.1432895

  8 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29252212
[Au] Autor:Khairani AZ; Ahmad NS; Khairani MZ
[Ad] Address:Ahmad Zamri Khairani, School of Educational Studies, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia, Ahmadzamri@usm.my.
[Ti] Title:Measuring Anger Types among Malaysian Adolescents using the Rasch Model.
[So] Source:J Appl Meas;18(4):449-458, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1529-7713
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adolescences is an important transitional phase in human development where they experience physiological as well as psychological changes. Nevertheless, these changes are often understood by teachers, parents, and even the adolescents themselves. Thus, conflicts exist and adolescents are affected from the conflict physically and emotionally. An important state of emotions that result from this conflict is anger. This article describes the development and validation of the 34-item Adolescent Anger Inventory (AAI) to measure types of anger among Malaysian adolescents. A sample of 2,834 adolescents in secondary school who provide responses that were analyzed using Rasch model measurement framework. The 4 response category worked satisfactorily for the scale developed. A total of 11 items did not fit to the model's expectations, and thus dropped from the final scale. The scale also demonstrated satisfactory reliability and separation evidence. Also, items in the AAI depicted no evidence of DIF between 14- and 16-year-old adolescents. Nevertheless, the AAI did not have sufficient items to target adolescents with a high level of physical aggressive anger.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anger
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Educational Measurement/methods
Models, Statistical
Psychometrics/methods
Surveys and Questionnaires
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Algorithms
Computer Simulation
Humans
Malaysia/epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Reproducibility of Results
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29516516
[Au] Autor:Bangee M; Qualter P
[Ad] Address:School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, England, UK.
[Ti] Title:Examining the visual processing patterns of lonely adults.
[So] Source:Scand J Psychol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1467-9450
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Prior research has shown that loneliness is associated with hypervigilance to social threats, with eye-tracking research showing lonely people display a specific attentional bias when viewing social rejection and social exclusion video footage (Bangee, Harris, Bridges, Rotenberg & Qualter, 2014; Qualter, Rotenberg, Barrett et al., 2013). The current study uses eye-tracker methodology to examine whether that attentional bias extends to negative emotional faces and negative social non-rejecting stimuli, or whether it could be explained only as a specific bias to social rejection/exclusion. It is important to establish whether loneliness relates to a specific or general attention bias because it may explain the maintenance of loneliness. Participants (N = 43, F = 35, Mage = 20 years and 2 months, SD = 3 months) took part in three tasks, where they viewed different social information: Task 1 - slides displaying four faces each with different emotions (anger, afraid, happy and neutral), Task 2 - slides displaying sixteen faces with varying ratios expressing happiness and anger, and Task 3 - slides displaying four visual scenes (socially rejecting, physically threatening, socially positive, neutral). For all three tasks, eye movements were recorded in real time with an eye-tracker. Results showed no association between loneliness and viewing patterns of facial expressions, but an association between loneliness and hypervigilant viewing of social rejecting stimuli. The findings indicate that lonely adults do not have a generalised hypervigilance to social threat, but have, instead, a specific attentional bias to rejection information in social contexts. Implications of the findings for interventions are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/sjop.12436

  10 / 15409 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29514121
[Au] Autor:Villa J; Pinkham AE; Kaufmann CN; Granholm E; Harvey PD; Depp CA
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, United States.
[Ti] Title:Interpersonal beliefs related to suicide and facial emotion processing in psychotic disorders.
[So] Source:J Psychiatr Res;100:107-112, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1379
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Deficits in social cognition are present in psychotic disorders; moreover, maladaptive interpersonal beliefs have been posited to underlie risk of suicidal ideation and behavior. However, the association between social cognition and negative appraisals as potential risk factors for suicidal ideation and behavior in psychotic disorders has not been assessed. In a pilot study, we assessed accuracy and error biases in facial emotion recognition (Penn ER-40), maladaptive interpersonal beliefs as measured by the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ), and current suicide ideation and history of past attempts in a sample of 101 outpatients with psychotic disorders (75 schizophrenia/schizoaffective; 26 bipolar disorder). INQ scores were positively associated with history of suicide attempts and current ideation. INQ scores were inversely related with emotion recognition accuracy yet positively correlated with bias toward perceiving anger in neutral expressions. The association between biases pertaining to anger and INQ scores persisted after adjusting for global cognitive ability and were more evident in schizophrenia than in bipolar disorder. The present findings suggest that maladaptive beliefs are associated with a tendency to misperceive neutral stimuli as threatening and are associated with suicidal ideation and behavior. Although better cognitive ability is associated with higher rates of suicide attempts in psychotic disorders, biases in misinterpreting anger in others may be a specific deficit related to formation of maladaptive beliefs about others, which, in turn, are associated with history of suicide attempts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 1541 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information