Database : MEDLINE
Search on : anterior and wall and myocardial and infarction [Words]
References found : 4254 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 426 go to page                         

  1 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29521061
[Au] Autor:Rajic D; Jeremic I; Stankovic S; Djuric O; Zivanovic-Radnic T; Mrdovic I; Mitrovic P; Matic D; Vasiljevic Z; Matic M; Asanin M
[Ad] Address:Cardiology Clinic, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia.
[Ti] Title:Oxidative stress markers predict early left ventricular systolic dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention.
[So] Source:Adv Clin Exp Med;27(2):185-191, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1899-5276
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), some patients develop left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) and acute heart failure (HF). Identifying patients with an increased risk of developing LVSD by means of biomarkers may help select patients requiring more aggressive therapy. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the levels of oxidative stress markers and development of LVSD and acute HF early after STEMI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study enrolled 148 patients with the first STEMI, who were treated by primary PCI < 12 h from the onset of symptoms. We assessed the impact of different biomarkers for developing LVSD and acute HF (Killip ≥ 2) including: markers of necrosis - peak creatine kinase (CK), markers of myocardial stretch - B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), inflammatory markers - C-reactive protein (CRP), leucocyte and neutrophil count, as well as oxidative stress markers - total thiol groups, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR). RESULTS: In multivariate analysis, thiol groups, peak CK, anterior wall infarction, and age were predictors of LVEF ≤ 40%. Out of 16 variables significantly associated with the Killip ≥ 2 in univariate logistic regression analysis, 5 appeared to be independently associated with acute HF in multivariate analysis: catalase, BNP, leucocytes, neutrophil count, and size of left atrium. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we have shown for the first time that thiol groups and catalase are independent predictors of STEMI complication - LVSD and acute HF, respectively. Beside routine used biomarkers of necrosis and myocardial stretch, thiol groups and catalase may provide additional information regarding the risk stratification.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17219/acem/64464

  2 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29514806
[Au] Autor:Watanabe S; Fish K; Kovacic JC; Bikou O; Leonardson L; Nomoto K; Aguero J; Kapur NK; Hajjar RJ; Ishikawa K
[Ad] Address:Cardiovascular Research Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
[Ti] Title:Left Ventricular Unloading Using an Impella CP Improves Coronary Flow and Infarct Zone Perfusion in Ischemic Heart Failure.
[So] Source:J Am Heart Assoc;7(6), 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2047-9980
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Delivering therapeutic materials, like stem cells or gene vectors, to the myocardium is difficult in the setting of ischemic heart failure because of decreased coronary flow and impaired microvascular perfusion (MP). The aim of this study was to determine if mechanical left ventricular (LV) unloading with the Impella increases coronary flow and MP in a subacute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Anterior transmural myocardial infarction (infarct size, 26.0±3.4%) was induced in Yorkshire pigs. At 2 weeks after myocardial infarction, 6 animals underwent mechanical LV unloading by Impella, whereas 4 animals underwent pharmacological LV unloading using sodium nitroprusside for 2 hours. LV unloading with Impella significantly reduced end-diastolic volume (-16±11mL, =0.02) and end-diastolic pressure (EDP; -32±23 mm Hg, =0.03), resulting in a significant decrease in LV end-diastolic wall stress (EDWS) (infarct: 71.6±14.7 to 43.3±10.8 kdynes/cm [ =0.02]; remote: 66.6±20.9 to 40.6±13.3 kdynes/cm [ =0.02]). Coronary flow increased immediately and remained elevated after 2 hours in Impella-treated pigs. Compared with the baseline, MP measured by fluorescent microspheres significantly increased within the infarct zone (109±81%, =0.003), but not in the remote zone. Although sodium nitroprusside effectively reduced LV-EDWS, 2 (50%) of sodium nitroprusside-treated pigs developed profound systemic hypotension. A significant correlation was observed between the infarct MP and EDWS ( =0.43, =0.03), suggesting an important role of EDWS in regulating MP during LV unloading in the infarcted myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: LV unloading using an Impella decreased EDWS and increased infarct MP without hemodynamic decompensation. Mechanical LV unloading is a novel and efficient approach to increase infarct MP in patients with subacute myocardial infarction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29186414
[Au] Autor:Ziegler KA; Ahles A; Wille T; Kerler J; Ramanujam D; Engelhardt S
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Technische Universität München, Biedersteiner Str. 29, Munich 80802, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Local sympathetic denervation attenuates myocardial inflammation and improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice.
[So] Source:Cardiovasc Res;114(2):291-299, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1755-3245
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aims: Cardiac inflammation has been suggested to be regulated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). However, due to the lack of methodology to surgically eliminate the myocardial SNS in mice, neuronal control of cardiac inflammation remains ill-defined. Here, we report a procedure for local cardiac sympathetic denervation in mice and tested its effect in a mouse model of heart failure post-myocardial infarction. Methods and results: Upon preparation of the carotid bifurcation, the right and the left superior cervical ganglia were localized and their pre- and postganglionic branches dissected before removal of the ganglion. Ganglionectomy led to an almost entire loss of myocardial sympathetic innervation in the left ventricular anterior wall. When applied at the time of myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac sympathetic denervation did not affect acute myocardial damage and infarct size. In contrast, cardiac sympathetic denervation significantly attenuated chronic consequences of MI, including myocardial inflammation, myocyte hypertrophy, and overall cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion: These data suggest a critical role for local sympathetic control of cardiac inflammation. Our model of myocardial sympathetic denervation in mice should prove useful to further dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac neural control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/cvr/cvx227

  4 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29509663
[Au] Autor:Sugiyama A; Hirano Y; Okada M; Yamawaki H
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Veterinary Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Higashi 23 bancho 35-1, Towada City, Aomori 034-8628, Japan. dv17003@st.kitasato-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Endostatin Stimulates Proliferation and Migration of Myofibroblasts Isolated from Myocardial Infarction Model Rats.
[So] Source:Int J Mol Sci;19(3), 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1422-0067
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Myofibroblasts contribute to the healing of infarcted areas after myocardial infarction through proliferation, migration, and production of extracellular matrix (ECM). Expression of endostatin, a cleaved fragment of type XVIII collagen, increases in the heart tissue of an experimental myocardial infarction model. In the present study, we examined the effect of endostatin on the function of myofibroblasts derived from an infarcted area. The myocardial infarction model was created by ligating the left anterior descending artery in rats. Two weeks after the operation, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive myofibroblasts were isolated from the infarcted area. Endostatin significantly increased the proliferation and migration of myofibroblasts in vitro. On the other hand, endostatin had no effect on the production of type I collagen, a major ECM protein produced by myofibroblasts. Endostatin activated Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and the pharmacological inhibition of these signaling pathways suppressed the endostatin-induced proliferation and migration. A knockdown of the gene in the myocardial infarction model rats using small interference RNA (siRNA) worsened the cardiac function concomitant with wall thinning and decreased the α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts and scar formation compared with that of control siRNA-injected rats. In summary, we demonstrated for the first time that endostatin might be an important factor in the healing process after myocardial infarction through the activation of myofibroblasts.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process

  5 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29467360
[Au] Autor:Kyaw K; Latt H; Aung SSM; Tun NM; Phoo WY; Yin HH
[Ad] Address:Institute for Heart and Vascular Health, Renown Regional Medical Center, Reno, NV, USA.
[Ti] Title:Atypical Presentation of Acute Coronary Syndrome and Importance of Wellens' Syndrome.
[So] Source:Am J Case Rep;19:199-202, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1941-5923
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a common and potentially life-threatening condition encountered in emergency departments. Despite its dreaded nature, nearly one-third of ACS present without chest pain and may mislead clinicians. Additionally, Wellens' syndrome is a pre-infarction stage of significant proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery stenosis, which can lead to extensive anterior wall myocardial infarction without timely intervention.  CASE REPORT We report the case of a 74-year-old woman presenting with isolated throat pain and Wellens' pattern in the initial EKG, which prompted the proper workup and management. Subsequently, coronary angiogram revealed more than 90% occlusion of the proximal LAD artery, and a drug-eluting stent was deployed. The patient did well after the procedure and the follow-up at 2 weeks after discharge was uneventful.   CONCLUSIONS This case highlights the importance of awareness of atypical presentation of ACS and importance of Wellens' syndrome. We also discuss the incidence of craniofacial symptoms of ACS, and the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and prognosis of Wellens' syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29488057
[Au] Autor:Cvetkovic D; Zivkovic V; Nikolic S
[Ad] Address:Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Belgrade - School of Medicine, 31a Deligradska str, Belgrade, 11000, Serbia.
[Ti] Title:Patent foramen ovale, paradoxical embolism and fatal coronary obstruction.
[So] Source:Forensic Sci Med Pathol;, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1556-2891
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 75-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room with chest pain and vomiting. An electrocardiogram and laboratory results were suggestive for myocardial infarction of the posterior cardiac wall. Echocardiography was indicative of aortic dissection, and a CT scan of the thoracic arteries showed a massive pulmonary thromboembolism and thrombotic occlusion of the right coronary artery (RCA). The woman died shortly after admission. Autopsy confirmed the presence of thromboemboli in the right pulmonary artery and its lobar branches. Also, the anterior aortic sinus was filled with a 9 cm long thromboembolus that extended into the RCA, making it dilated and completely occluded. Another 3.5 cm long thromboembolus extended from the beginning of the left subclavian artery. A patent foramen ovale (PFO) was present. On the posterior wall of the left ventricle, there was an area suggestive of myocardial infarction, and histopathological examination confirmed that it was 24-48 hours old. The coronary circulation was "co-dominant". The sources of thrombotic masses were the deep veins of the lower limbs. The cause of death was myocardial infarction, caused by RCA occlusion with thromboembolus originating from the deep veins of the left lower leg after paradoxical embolism via PFO. This case illustrates that although deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, and PFO are not rare findings at autopsy, their combination could be a relatively rare cause of fatal coronary artery occlusion after paradoxical embolism.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12024-018-9963-0

  7 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29486997
[Au] Autor:Bière L; Garcia G; Guillou S; Larcher F; Furber A; Willoteaux S; Mirebeau-Prunier D; Prunier F
[Ad] Address:Institut MitoVasc, Université d'Angers, CHU d'Angers, France; UMR CNRS 6015 - INSERM U1083, Angers, France; CHU d'Angers, Service de cardiologie, Angers, France. Electronic address: lobiere@chu-angers.fr.
[Ti] Title:ST2 as a predictor of late ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction.
[So] Source:Int J Cardiol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1874-1754
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Out of 163 STEMI patients, 33 presented left ventricular remodeling (LVR) as assessed by multiple cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) scans. LVR patients were identified as EarlyLVR (LVR occurring between baseline and 3 months) or LateLVR (LVR occurring between 3 months and one year), and matched to non-remodeler patients in term of age, gender, anterior infarction, baseline LV ejection fraction and infarct size. ST2 and NT-proBNP were measured at baseline and 3 months. Systolic wall stress (SWS) was calculated by CMR. At baseline, mean levels of ST2, NT-proBNP and SWS were 67.1 ±â€¯54.1 ng/mL, 1529 ±â€¯1702 ng/L and 17.9 ±â€¯7.1 10 N·m , respectively, and did not differ among the groups. At 3 months, EarlyLVR patients presented significant higher ST2, NT-proBNP and SWS (31.6 ±â€¯12.7 ng/mL, 1142 ±â€¯1069 ng/L, 25.5 ±â€¯9.7 10 N·m ), compared to the corresponding non-remodelers (20.5 ±â€¯8.6 ng/mL, 397 ±â€¯273 ng/L, 18 ±â€¯7.3 10 N·m ; with p = 0.017, 0.040, and 0.036, respectively). LateLVR patients presented higher ST2 at 3 months than their non-remodelers (33.6 ±â€¯15.9 versus 23.66 ±â€¯8.7 ng/mL, p = 0.046), while NT-proBNP and SWS were not different between groups at both timepoints.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29330835
[Au] Autor:HerniaSurge Group
[Ti] Title:International guidelines for groin hernia management.
[So] Source:Hernia;22(1):1-165, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1248-9204
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, more than 20 million patients undergo groin hernia repair annually. The many different approaches, treatment indications and a significant array of techniques for groin hernia repair warrant guidelines to standardize care, minimize complications, and improve results. The main goal of these guidelines is to improve patient outcomes, specifically to decrease recurrence rates and reduce chronic pain, the most frequent problems following groin hernia repair. They have been endorsed by all five continental hernia societies, the International Endo Hernia Society and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery. METHODS: An expert group of international surgeons (the HerniaSurge Group) and one anesthesiologist pain expert was formed. The group consisted of members from all continents with specific experience in hernia-related research. Care was taken to include surgeons who perform different types of repair and had preferably performed research on groin hernia surgery. During the Group's first meeting, evidence-based medicine (EBM) training occurred and 166 key questions (KQ) were formulated. EBM rules were followed in complete literature searches (including a complete search by The Dutch Cochrane database) to January 1, 2015 and to July 1, 2015 for level 1 publications. The articles were scored by teams of two or three according to Oxford, SIGN and Grade methodologies. During five 2-day meetings, results were discussed with the working group members leading to 136 statements and 88 recommendations. Recommendations were graded as "strong" (recommendations) or "weak" (suggestions) and by consensus in some cases upgraded. In the Results and summary section below, the term "should" refers to a recommendation. The AGREE II instrument was used to validate the guidelines. An external review was performed by three international experts. They recommended the guidelines with high scores. The risk factors for inguinal hernia (IH) include: family history, previous contra-lateral hernia, male gender, age, abnormal collagen metabolism, prostatectomy, and low body mass index. Peri-operative risk factors for recurrence include poor surgical techniques, low surgical volumes, surgical inexperience and local anesthesia. These should be considered when treating IH patients. IH diagnosis can be confirmed by physical examination alone in the vast majority of patients with appropriate signs and symptoms. Rarely, ultrasound is necessary. Less commonly still, a dynamic MRI or CT scan or herniography may be needed. The EHS classification system is suggested to stratify IH patients for tailored treatment, research and audit. Symptomatic groin hernias should be treated surgically. Asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic male IH patients may be managed with "watchful waiting" since their risk of hernia-related emergencies is low. The majority of these individuals will eventually require surgery; therefore, surgical risks and the watchful waiting strategy should be discussed with patients. Surgical treatment should be tailored to the surgeon's expertise, patient- and hernia-related characteristics and local/national resources. Furthermore, patient health-related, life style and social factors should all influence the shared decision-making process leading up to hernia management. Mesh repair is recommended as first choice, either by an open procedure or a laparo-endoscopic repair technique. One standard repair technique for all groin hernias does not exist. It is recommended that surgeons/surgical services provide both anterior and posterior approach options. Lichtenstein and laparo-endoscopic repair are best evaluated. Many other techniques need further evaluation. Provided that resources and expertise are available, laparo-endoscopic techniques have faster recovery times, lower chronic pain risk and are cost effective. There is discussion concerning laparo-endoscopic management of potential bilateral hernias (occult hernia issue). After patient consent, during TAPP, the contra-lateral side should be inspected. This is not suggested during unilateral TEP repair. After appropriate discussions with patients concerning results tissue repair (first choice is the Shouldice technique) can be offered. Day surgery is recommended for the majority of groin hernia repair provided aftercare is organized. Surgeons should be aware of the intrinsic characteristics of the meshes they use. Use of so-called low-weight mesh may have slight short-term benefits like reduced postoperative pain and shorter convalescence, but are not associated with better longer-term outcomes like recurrence and chronic pain. Mesh selection on weight alone is not recommended. The incidence of erosion seems higher with plug versus flat mesh. It is suggested not to use plug repair techniques. The use of other implants to replace the standard flat mesh in the Lichtenstein technique is currently not recommended. In almost all cases, mesh fixation in TEP is unnecessary. In both TEP and TAPP it is recommended to fix mesh in M3 hernias (large medial) to reduce recurrence risk. Antibiotic prophylaxis in average-risk patients in low-risk environments is not recommended in open surgery. In laparo-endoscopic repair it is never recommended. Local anesthesia in open repair has many advantages, and its use is recommended provided the surgeon is experienced in this technique. General anesthesia is suggested over regional in patients aged 65 and older as it might be associated with fewer complications like myocardial infarction, pneumonia and thromboembolism. Perioperative field blocks and/or subfascial/subcutaneous infiltrations are recommended in all cases of open repair. Patients are recommended to resume normal activities without restrictions as soon as they feel comfortable. Provided expertise is available, it is suggested that women with groin hernias undergo laparo-endoscopic repair in order to decrease the risk of chronic pain and avoid missing a femoral hernia. Watchful waiting is suggested in pregnant women as groin swelling most often consists of self-limited round ligament varicosities. Timely mesh repair by a laparo-endoscopic approach is suggested for femoral hernias provided expertise is available. All complications of groin hernia management are discussed in an extensive chapter on the topic. Overall, the incidence of clinically significant chronic pain is in the 10-12% range, decreasing over time. Debilitating chronic pain affecting normal daily activities or work ranges from 0.5 to 6%. Chronic postoperative inguinal pain (CPIP) is defined as bothersome moderate pain impacting daily activities lasting at least 3 months postoperatively and decreasing over time. CPIP risk factors include: young age, female gender, high preoperative pain, early high postoperative pain, recurrent hernia and open repair. For CPIP the focus should be on nerve recognition in open surgery and, in selected cases, prophylactic pragmatic nerve resection (planned resection is not suggested). It is suggested that CPIP management be performed by multi-disciplinary teams. It is also suggested that CPIP be managed by a combination of pharmacological and interventional measures and, if this is unsuccessful, followed by, in selected cases (triple) neurectomy and (in selected cases) mesh removal. For recurrent hernia after anterior repair, posterior repair is recommended. If recurrence occurs after a posterior repair, an anterior repair is recommended. After a failed anterior and posterior approach, management by a specialist hernia surgeon is recommended. Risk factors for hernia incarceration/strangulation include: female gender, femoral hernia and a history of hospitalization related to groin hernia. It is suggested that treatment of emergencies be tailored according to patient- and hernia-related factors, local expertise and resources. Learning curves vary between different techniques. Probably about 100 supervised laparo-endoscopic repairs are needed to achieve the same results as open mesh surgery like Lichtenstein. It is suggested that case load per surgeon is more important than center volume. It is recommended that minimum requirements be developed to certify individuals as expert hernia surgeon. The same is true for the designation "Hernia Center". From a cost-effectiveness perspective, day-case laparoscopic IH repair with minimal use of disposables is recommended. The development and implementation of national groin hernia registries in every country (or region, in the case of small country populations) is suggested. They should include patient follow-up data and account for local healthcare structures. A dissemination and implementation plan of the guidelines will be developed by global (HerniaSurge), regional (international societies) and local (national chapters) initiatives through internet websites, social media and smartphone apps. An overarching plan to improve access to safe IH surgery in low-resource settings (LRSs) is needed. It is suggested that this plan contains simple guidelines and a sustainability strategy, independent of international aid. It is suggested that in LRSs the focus be on performing high-volume Lichtenstein repair under local anesthesia using low-cost mesh. Three chapters discuss future research, guidelines for general practitioners and guidelines for patients. CONCLUSIONS: The HerniaSurge Group has developed these extensive and inclusive guidelines for the management of adult groin hernia patients. It is hoped that they will lead to better outcomes for groin hernia patients wherever they live. More knowledge, better training, national audit and specialization in groin hernia management will standardize care for these patients, lead to more effective and efficient healthcare and provide direction for future research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10029-017-1668-x

  9 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29276114
[Au] Autor:Chang W; Wu QQ; Xiao Y; Jiang XH; Yuan Y; Zeng XF; Tang QZ
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430060, PR China; Cardiovascular Research Institute, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430060, PR China; Hubei Key Laboratory of Cardiology, Wuhan, 430060, PR China; Wuhan No.1 Hospital, Wuhan, 430060, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Acacetin protects against cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction by mediating MAPK and PI3K/Akt signal pathway.
[So] Source:J Pharmacol Sci;135(4):156-163, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1347-8648
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since inhibiting cardiac remodeling is a critical treatment goal after myocardial infarction (MI), many drugs have been evaluated for this purpose. Acacetin is a flavonoid compound that has been shown to have anti-cancer, anti-mutagenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-peroxidative effects. In this study, we investigated whether acacetin is able to exert a protective effect against MI. One week after anterior wall standard MI surgeries or sham surgeries were performed in mice, acacetin was administered via gavage for two weeks. The results of echocardiographic and hemodynamic evaluation revealed that cardiac dysfunction significantly improved after acacetin treatment. H&E staining indicated that the ratio of the infarct size and the cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was decreased by acacetin. Masson's staining detected that the fibrotic area ratio was evidently lower in the acacetin-treated MI group. TUNEL assays showed that acacetin ameliorated cardiomyocyte apoptosis after MI. RT-qPCR analysis showed that levels of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers were significantly decreased after acacetin treatment. Western blot analysis of various signaling pathway proteins showed that acacetin targets the MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Collectively, acacetin improves mouse left ventricular function and attenuates cardiac remodeling by inhibiting of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Flavones/pharmacology
Flavones/therapeutic use
MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects
Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy
Myocardial Infarction/physiopathology
Ventricular Remodeling/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apoptosis/drug effects
Humans
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Myocardial Infarction/pathology
Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology
Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism
Ventricular Function, Left/drug effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Flavones); EC 2.7.1.- (Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases); EC 2.7.11.1 (Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt); KWI7J0A2CC (acacetin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171226
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 4254 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29325364
[Au] Autor:Liu H; Wu Q; Tan HW; Pang J
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Guizhou Provincial People's Hospital, Guiyang 550002, China.
[Ti] Title:[The efficacy and safety of coil embolization of septal branch in the treatment of patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing Za Zhi;45(12):1044-1048, 2017 Dec 24.
[Is] ISSN:0253-3758
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To observe the clinical efficacy and safety of coil embolization of septal branch in the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Eighteen patients with HOCM hospitalized in our department from September 2014 to October 2016 were enrolled in this study. There were 12 males and 6 females in this cohort and the age of patients ranged from 22 to 64 years old. Left ventricular outflow tract gradient (LVOTG) was derived from echocardiographic apical five-chamber view at pre-operation and at 48 hours and 6 months post operation. 24-hour Holter ECG examination was performed to assess the ventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, atrioventricular block at 3 days and 6 months after the interventional operation. Routine ECG and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) examination were performed at pre-operation, at 6, 24 and 48 hours post operation. Cardiac troponin T (cTnT) was detected at pre-operation, at 24, 48 hours and 6 days post operation. The clinical symptoms (including chest tightness, chest pain, shortness of breath, syncope) and NYHA classification were assessed at 1, 6 months after the operation by telephone follow-up or outpatient clinic visit. The average preoperative LVOTG detected by cardiac catheter was 103.6 (92.0, 115.0) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) , and the average LVOTG significantly reduced to 44.3 (41.6, 47.2) mmHg immediately after operation ( 0.01). The average ventricular septal thickness at 48 hours (19.2±3.1) mm and 6 months (17.8±2.8) mm after operation tended to be lower than the preoperative ventricular septal thickness ((20.4±3.5) mm, 0.05). The echocardiographic derived average LVOTG at 48 hours and 6 months after operation was 42.9 (41.1, 45.5) and 39.1 (37.5, 41.0) mmHg, which were significant lower than the preoperative average LVOTG (94.3 (88.5, 101.8) mmHg, both 0.01). LVOTG at 6 months after operation was significantly lower than that at 48 hours after the operation ( 0.05). The NYHA classification at 6 months after operation was significantly improved compared to pre-operation NYHA classification ( 0.01). During and after the operation, there was no complete atrioventricular block and ventricular tachycardia, no patient developed anterior wall and inferior myocardial infarction. Only one patient experienced transient left bundle branch block. During the 6 months following-up, there was no death, syncope, chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, paroxysmal dyspnea and/or lower extremity edema, ventricular tachycardia, atrioventricular block and atrial fibrillation, complete atrioventricular block and ventricular arrhythmia. The coil embolization of septal branch is effective and safe for the treatment of patients with HOCM.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180111
[Lr] Last revision date:180111
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0253-3758.2017.12.008


page 1 of 426 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information