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Search on : anuria [Words]
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[PMID]: 29510913
[Au] Autor:Kuday Kaykisiz E; Yildirim MB; Dadali E; Kaykisiz H; Ünlüer EE
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Bitlis State Hospital, 13000 Bitlis, Turkey. Electronic address: eylemkuday@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Different manifestation of a familiar diagnosis: From anuria to acute appendicitis.
[So] Source:Am J Emerg Med;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The differential diagnosis of anuria in emergency department (ED) is broad. Secondary to intraabdominal mass pressure or infections, symptoms of micturation difficulties or disuria accompanying to back pain may arise with the interruption of sacral nerve stimulation. Here, we report a patient who admitted to ED with back pain and anuria and diagnosed acute appendicitis (AA) after advanced investigation despite of not to have any abdominal pain. A 36-year-old man admitted to our ED with a 6-h history of back pain and urination difficulty. 750mL of clear urine output was observed after bladder catheterization. Abdominal computerized tomography with intravenous contrast was used and revealed acute appendicitis. The patient consulted with a general surgeon and hospitalized for operation. After the operation, back pain was disappeared, and spontaneous micturition was seen. This case not only represents an uncommon manifestation of AA, but also alerts us to the importance of anatomical considerations when interpreting disease extent with imaging. In the differential diagnosis of back pain and urination difficulty, the rare possibility of AA should be taken into account. Because the presence of unusual findings, such as those associated with the urinary tract or lumbosacral pathologies, may further obscure the diagnosis and delay appropriate therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506150
[Au] Autor:Sinnollareddy MG; Roberts MS; Lipman J; Peake SL; Roberts JA
[Ad] Address:School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving sustained low-efficiency diafiltration.
[So] Source:J Antimicrob Chemother;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2091
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Piperacillin is a ß-lactam penicillin antibiotic commonly used for the empirical therapy of sepsis and other hospital-acquired infections. However, knowledge regarding the effect of sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f), a technique increasingly being used in ICUs, on piperacillin pharmacokinetics (PK) and dosing in critically ill patients is lacking. Objectives: To describe the PK of piperacillin during SLED-f and compare the results with those reported for other forms of renal replacement therapies. Methods: Serial blood samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit during SLED-f in one session and from an arterial catheter during sampling without SLED-f. Piperacillin concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. Non-compartmental PK analysis of the data was performed. Results: The median clearance and area under the concentration-time curve during SLED-f were 6 L/h and 532 mg·h/L, respectively. Fifty-eight percent of piperacillin was cleared by a single SLED-f session (6 h) compared with previous reports of 30%-45% clearance by a 3.5 h intermittent haemodialysis session. Clearance, half-life and area under the concentration-time curve during SLED-f obtained from this study were comparable with those reported in the post-dilution mode of continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration studies. Conclusions: As it can be challenging to accurately predict when SLED-f will be initiated in the critically ill, a maintenance dose of at least 4 g every 12 h with at least a 2 g replacement dose post-SLED-f would be a practical approach to piperacillin dosing in ICU patients with anuria receiving SLED-f with a duration similar to the current study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jac/dky057

  3 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29332935
[Au] Autor:Stenvinkel P; Painer J; Kuro-O M; Lanaspa M; Arnold W; Ruf T; Shiels PG; Johnson RJ
[Ad] Address:Divison of Renal Medicine M99, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Hälsovägen 13, 14157 Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Novel treatment strategies for chronic kidney disease: insights from the animal kingdom.
[So] Source:Nat Rev Nephrol;, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1759-507X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many of the >2 million animal species that inhabit Earth have developed survival mechanisms that aid in the prevention of obesity, kidney disease, starvation, dehydration and vascular ageing; however, some animals remain susceptible to these complications. Domestic and captive wild felids, for example, show susceptibility to chronic kidney disease (CKD), potentially linked to the high protein intake of these animals. By contrast, naked mole rats are a model of longevity and are protected from extreme environmental conditions through mechanisms that provide resistance to oxidative stress. Biomimetic studies suggest that the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) offers protection in extreme environmental conditions and promotes longevity in the animal kingdom. Similarly, during months of fasting, immobilization and anuria, hibernating bears are protected from muscle wasting, azotaemia, thrombotic complications, organ damage and osteoporosis - features that are often associated with CKD. Improved understanding of the susceptibility and protective mechanisms of these animals and others could provide insights into novel strategies to prevent and treat several human diseases, such as CKD and ageing-associated complications. An integrated collaboration between nephrologists and experts from other fields, such as veterinarians, zoologists, biologists, anthropologists and ecologists, could introduce a novel approach for improving human health and help nephrologists to find novel treatment strategies for CKD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1038/nrneph.2017.169

  4 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29465577
[Au] Autor:Peng T; Hu Z; Yang X; Gao Y; Ma C
[Ad] Address:Department of Nephrology, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan City, China.
[Ti] Title:Nitrite-induced acute kidney injury with secondary hyperparathyroidism: Case report and literature review.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(8):e9889, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Acute kidney injury (AKI) with hyperparathyroidism caused by nitrite was rare, and renal function and parathyroid hormone (PTH) decreased to normal range after therapy. PATIENT CONCERNS: Acute kidney injury was diagnosed in a 40-year-old male with hyperparathyroidism and cyanosis of his hands and both forearms. DIAGNOSES: The patient ate some recently pickled vegetables, and he experienced nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea without oliguria or anuria; Additionally, his hands and both forearms had a typical blue ash appearance. After admission, the laboratory findings indicated theincreasing serum creatinine (Scr) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). He was diagnosed as acute kidney injury with hyperparathyroidism caused by nitrite. INTERVENTIONS: The patient stopped eating the pickled vegetables and was given rehydration, added calories and other supportive therapy without any glucocorticoids. OUTCOMES: According to his clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging results, the patient was diagnosed with acute kidney injury with secondary hyperparathyroidism. He was given symptomatic supportive care therapy. After one week, the serum creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, proteinuria, and urine red blood cell values decreased to normal range. LESSONS: Nitrite-induced acute kidney injury with secondary hyperparathyroidism was relatively rare. After therapy, the function of the kidney and parathyroid returned to normal. This case suggests that detailed collection of medical history, physical examination and correct symptomatic treatment is very important.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary/chemically induced
Nitrites/poisoning
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Kidney Injury/therapy
Adult
Cyanosis/chemically induced
Diarrhea/chemically induced
Fluid Therapy
Food Preservation
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary/therapy
Male
Nausea/chemically induced
Nutritional Support
Vomiting/chemically induced
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Nitrites)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180222
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009889

  5 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29443759
[Au] Autor:Han P; Yang L; Huang XW; Zhu XQ; Chen L; Wang N; Li Z; Tian DA; Qin H
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan.
[Ti] Title:A traumatic hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm and arterioportal fistula, with severe diarrhea as the first symptom: A case report and review of the literature.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(7):e9893, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Hepaticarterioportal fistula (APF) is a rare cause of portal hypertension and gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and presents as abnormal communication between the hepatic artery and portal vein. Percutaneous liver biopsy is a main iatrogenic cause of AFP. However, non-iatrogenic, abdominal, trauma-related APF is rarely reported. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 29-year-old man presenting with severe, watery diarrhea was transferred to our hospital, and his condition was suspected to be acute gastroenteritis because he ate expired food and suffered a penetrating abdominal stab wound 5 years ago. After admission, the patient suffered from hematemesis, hematochezia, ascites, anuria, and kidney failure, and he developed shock. DIAGNOSES: The patient was finally diagnosed as a traumatic hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm and APF. INTERVENTIONS: This patient was treated with emergency transarterial embolization using coils. Since a secondary feeding vessel was exposed after the first embolization of the main feeding artery, a less-selective embolization was performed again. OUTCOMES: During the 6-month follow-up period, the patient remained asymptomatic. LESSONS: A penetrating abdominal stab wound is a rare cause of hepatic APFs, and occasionally leads to portal hypertension, the medical history and physical examination are the most important cornerstones of clinical diagnosis. Interventional radiology is essential for the diagnosis and treatment of an APF.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abdominal Injuries/complications
Aneurysm, False
Arteriovenous Fistula
Diarrhea/diagnosis
Embolization, Therapeutic/methods
Hepatic Artery/diagnostic imaging
Hypertension, Portal/diagnosis
Portal Vein/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aneurysm, False/diagnosis
Aneurysm, False/etiology
Aneurysm, False/physiopathology
Aneurysm, False/therapy
Arteriovenous Fistula/diagnosis
Arteriovenous Fistula/etiology
Arteriovenous Fistula/physiopathology
Arteriovenous Fistula/therapy
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea/etiology
Humans
Hypertension, Portal/etiology
Male
Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009893

  6 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29459381
[Au] Autor:Thurman JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado Joshua.Thurman@ucdenver.edu.
[Ti] Title:A Patient with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Kidney Failure.
[So] Source:Clin J Am Soc Nephrol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1555-905X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29361255
[Au] Autor:Tsai D; Udy AA; Stewart PC; Gourley S; Morick NM; Lipman J; Roberts JA
[Ad] Address:Burns, Trauma and Critical Care Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Pharmacy Department, Alice Springs Hospital, Alice Springs, Northern Territory.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of augmented renal clearance and performance of glomerular filtration estimates in Indigenous Australian patients requiring intensive care admission.
[So] Source:Anaesth Intensive Care;46(1):42-50, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0310-057X
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Augmented renal clearance (ARC) refers to the enhanced renal excretion of circulating solute commonly demonstrated in numerous critically ill subgroups. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of ARC in critically ill Indigenous Australian patients and explore the accuracy of commonly employed mathematical estimates of glomerular filtration. We completed a single-centre, prospective, observational study in the intensive care unit (ICU), Alice Springs Hospital, Central Australia. Participants were critically ill adult Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian patients with a urinary catheter in situ. Exclusion criteria were anuria, pregnancy or the requirement for renal replacement therapy. Daily eight-hour measured creatinine clearances (CrCLm) were collected throughout the ICU stay. ARC was defined by a CrCLm ≥130 ml/min/1.73 m2. The Cockcroft-Gault and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations were also used to calculate mathematical estimates for comparison. In total, 131 patients were recruited (97 Indigenous, 34 non-Indigenous) and 445 samples were collected. The median (range) CrCLm was 93.0 (5.14 to 205.2) and 90.4 (18.7 to 206.8) ml/min/1.73 m2 in Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients, respectively. Thirty-one of 97 (32%) Indigenous patients manifested ARC, compared to 7 of 34 (21%) non-Indigenous patients (P=0.21). Younger age, major surgery, higher baseline renal function and an absence of diabetes were all associated with ARC. Both mathematical estimates manifest limited accuracy. ARC was prevalent in critically ill Indigenous patients, which places them at significant risk of underdosing with renally excreted drugs. CrCLm should be obtained wherever possible to ensure accurate dosing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180123
[Lr] Last revision date:180123
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29340810
[Au] Autor:Hassinger TE; Mehaffey JH; Mullen MG; Michaels AD; Elwood NR; Levi ST; Hedrick TL; Friel CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. teh3rz@hscmail.mcc.virginia.edu.
[Ti] Title:Ureteral stents increase risk of postoperative acute kidney injury following colorectal surgery.
[So] Source:Surg Endosc;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2218
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Ureteral stents are commonly placed before colorectal resection to assist in identification of ureters and prevent injury. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common cause of morbidity and increased cost following colorectal surgery. Although previously associated with reflex anuria, prophylactic stents have not been found to increase AKI. We sought to determine the impact of ureteral stents on the incidence of AKI following colorectal surgery. METHODS: All patients undergoing colon or rectal resection at a single institution between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed using American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset. AKI was defined as a rise in serum creatinine to ≥ 1.5 times the preoperative value. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of AKI. RESULTS: 2910 patients underwent colorectal resection. Prophylactic ureteral stents were placed in 129 patients (4.6%). Postoperative AKI occurred in 335 (11.5%) patients during their hospitalization. The stent group demonstrated increased AKI incidence (32.6% vs. 10.5%; p < 0.0001) with bilateral having a higher rate than unilateral stents. Hospital costs were higher in the stent group ($23,629 vs. $16,091; p < 0.0001), and patients with bilateral stents had the highest costs. Multivariable logistic regression identified predictors of AKI after colorectal surgery including age, procedure duration, and ureteral stent placement. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic ureteral stents independently increased AKI risk when placed prior to colorectal surgery. These data demonstrate increased morbidity and hospital costs related to usage of stents in colorectal surgery, indicating that placement should be limited to patients with highest potential benefit.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180117
[Lr] Last revision date:180117
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00464-018-6054-y

  9 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29326277
[Ti] Title:â–¼Patiromer for the management of hyperkalaemia.
[So] Source:Drug Ther Bull;56(1):6-9, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1755-5248
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hyperkalaemia is a potentially life-threatening condition, in which there is an abnormally high concentration of potassium ions in the blood. Cation-exchange resins (e.g. calcium or sodium polystyrene sulfonate) that bind potassium in the gastrointestinal tract to increase faecal elimination have been used as part of the management of hyperkalaemia but they have some serious adverse effects, including potentially fatal gastrointestinal necrosis. Patiromer (â–¼Veltassa - Vifor Fresenius) is a cation-exchange polymer that is licensed for the treatment of hyperkalaemia in adults and, unlike other exchange resins, its licence is not restricted to people with anuria, severe oliguria or those requiring or undergoing dialysis. Here, we review the evidence for the efficacy and safety of patiromer and consider its place in the management of hyperkalaemia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1136/dtb.2018.1.0575

  10 / 4015 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29252954
[Au] Autor:Vollmer JP; Haen S; Wolburg H; Lehmann R; Steiner J; Reddersen S; Fend F; Fallier-Becker P
[Ad] Address:Institute of Anaesthesiology, Klinikum Stuttgart, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Propofol Related Infusion Syndrome: Ultrastructural Evidence for a Mitochondrial Disorder.
[So] Source:Crit Care Med;46(1):e91-e94, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1530-0293
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The objective of this report of a fatal propofol-related infusion syndrome in a young adult was to present-to our knowledge for the first time-direct ultrastructural evidence for the central role of mitochondrial damage in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. DATA SOURCES: Histological and electron microscopical analysis of liver, skeletal, and heart muscle obtained by autopsy and blood obtained from patient. STUDY SELECTION: Case report. DATA EXTRACTION: In addition to conventional macroscopical and histological investigations, electron-microscopical analysis of myocardial- and skeletal muscle and liver tissue obtained at autopsy from a young man was performed in order to search for ultrastructural changes of mitochondria. Acylcarnitine concentrations of his blood were determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. DATA SYNTHESIS: A 19-year-old male was admitted with acute left-side hemiparesis. The patient was intubated, then propofol infusion started, and a craniotomy was performed to remove an intracerebral hematoma. In the postoperative period, the patient presented with elevated intracranial pressure and brain edema. After repeat surgery, the patient showed impaired systolic left ventricular function, increasing fever, anuria, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis, and he finally expired. Electron microscopy revealed dark, electron dense amorphous structures associated with mitochondria in heart muscle and liver tissue obtained at autopsy. Peripheral blood analysis revealed increased levels of acetyl-, propionyl-, butyryl-, malonyl-, and valeryl-carnitine as an indicator for propofol-related infusion syndrome, as well as for propofol-mediated inhibition of free fatty acid uptake into mitochondria, affecting beta-oxidation. CONCLUSIONS: Electron dense bodies found in association with mitochondria in muscle and liver cells probably correspond to accumulation of free fatty acid provide direct morphological evidence for the mitochondrial damage in propofol-related infusion syndrome.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mitochondrial Diseases/chemically induced
Mitochondrial Diseases/pathology
Propofol Infusion Syndrome/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Carnitine/analogs & derivatives
Carnitine/blood
Craniotomy
Hematoma, Subdural, Intracranial/surgery
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Mitochondria, Heart/drug effects
Mitochondria, Heart/pathology
Mitochondria, Liver/drug effects
Mitochondria, Liver/pathology
Mitochondria, Muscle/drug effects
Mitochondria, Muscle/pathology
Postoperative Complications/chemically induced
Postoperative Complications/pathology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (acylcarnitine); S7UI8SM58A (Carnitine)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171227
[Lr] Last revision date:171227
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/CCM.0000000000002802


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