Database : MEDLINE
Search on : aortic and arch and syndromes [Words]
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[PMID]: 29245349
[Au] Autor:Zhou JM; Liu XW; Yang Y; Wang BZ; Wang JA
[Ad] Address:aHypertension Center of Zhejiang HospitalbHeart Center of the Second, Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medical, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China.
[Ti] Title:Secondary hypertension due to isolated interrupted aortic arch in a 45-year-old person: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(49):e9122, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Though it is rare, isolated interrupted aortic arch (IAA) could lead to hypertension. Surgical repair is the only effective curative method to treat IAA conditions and patients with IAA can hardly survive to adulthood with medication alone. We report an IAA case that of a 45-year-old male patient who survived for 45 years without surgical treatment. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 45-year-old man was referred to the hospital presenting with abnormal blood pressure level. Both computed tomography angiogram (CTA) and angiography revealed IAA. DIAGNOSES: The patient was diagnosed as IAA based on computed tomography angiogram (CTA) and angiography. INTERVENTIONS: The patient's blood pressure was severely high and refractory. He refused surgical treatment and accepted antihypertensive medication for 10 days. OUTCOMES: The patient's office blood pressure level was abnormal, fluctuating between 140/90 and 160/100 mm Hg, but 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring showed normal level. LESSONS: Hypertension due to IAA could be controlled with medications, even surgery is not performed. The discrepancy between ambulatory and office blood pressure levels may be due to the white coat effect.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aorta, Thoracic/pathology
Aortic Arch Syndromes/complications
Hypertension/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use
Aortic Arch Syndromes/drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antihypertensive Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180105
[Lr] Last revision date:180105
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009122

  2 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29174374
[Au] Autor:Wallis C; McLaren CA
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Paediatrics, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK. Electronic address: Colin.wallis@gosh.nhs.uk.
[Ti] Title:Tracheobronchial stenting for airway malacia.
[So] Source:Paediatr Respir Rev;, 2017 Oct 13.
[Is] ISSN:1526-0550
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tracheobronchomalacia is a rare but clinically troublesome condition in paediatrics. The softening of the major airways - which can include some or all of the tracheobronchial tree can lead to symptoms ranging from the minor (harsh barking cough, recurrent chest infections) to severe respiratory difficulties including prolonged ventilator support and 'near death attacks'. The causes are broadly divided into intrinsic softening of the airway wall which is considered a primary defect (e.g. syndromes; post tracheo-oesophageal fistula repair; extreme prematurity) or secondary malacia due to external compression from vascular structures or cardiac components. These secondary changes can persist even when the external compression is relieved, for example, following the repair of a pulmonary artery sling or double aortic arch. For children with severe clinical symptoms attributed to malacia, consideration is given to possible surgical remedies such as an aortopexy for short limited areas of malacia, or long term positive pressure support with CPAP either by non invasive or tracheostomy interface. More recently the role of stenting in children is receiving attention, especially with the development of newer techniques such as bioabsorbable stents which buy time for a natural history of improvement in the malacia to occur. This paper reviews the stents available and discusses the pros and cons of stenting in paediatric airway malacia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171127
[Lr] Last revision date:171127
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29049702
[Au] Autor:Mohamed Ahmed E; Visan AC; Stuart G; Stoica S
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol, UK.
[Ti] Title:Aortic root and hemiarch replacement in a patient with Loeys-Dietz and hypoplastic left heart syndromes.
[So] Source:Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg;, 2017 Oct 11.
[Is] ISSN:1569-9285
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 15-year-old patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome underwent 3-stage palliation by the age of 3 years. He was later diagnosed with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. On follow-up imaging, the neoaorta was dilated at 50 mm in diameter. He underwent aortic root replacement with a composite valve conduit and hemiarch replacement, using a boat-shaped Dacron graft. The uncertainty of how univentricular circulation would tolerate long bypass time steered us away from a total arch replacement. His postoperative recovery was uneventful. Imaging postoperatively demonstrated stable dilatation of the aorta distal to the hemiarch replacement. Considering the risk of reintervention, we elected to monitor the distal aorta. The combination of Loeys-Dietz syndrome and hypoplastic left heart syndrome presents unique challenges, rarely reported in the literature.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/icvts/ivx336

  4 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28838515
[Au] Autor:Gomibuchi T; Seto T; Yamamoto T; Nakahara K; Ohashi N; Ohtsu Y; Wada Y; Fukui D; Okada K
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Surgical Repair of Cervical Aortic Arch With Brain Circulation Anomaly Through Clamshell Incision.
[So] Source:Ann Thorac Surg;104(3):e235-e237, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6259
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report the successful surgical repair of a cervical aortic arch and diverticulum with a brain circulation anomaly through a clamshell incision. Because of the reliability of selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and superior exposure, we chose an approach through a clamshell incision. We describe the utility of this approach for treating a cervical aortic arch with a diverticulum.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/complications
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/surgery
Aortic Arch Syndromes/etiology
Aortic Arch Syndromes/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic/diagnosis
Aortic Arch Syndromes/diagnosis
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170915
[Lr] Last revision date:170915
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28807406
[Au] Autor:Merlocco A; Lacro RV; Gauvreau K; Rabideau N; Singh MN; Prakash A
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Title:Longitudinal Changes in Segmental Aortic Stiffness Determined by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in Children and Young Adults With Connective Tissue Disorders (the Marfan, Loeys-Dietz, and Ehlers-Danlos Syndromes, and Nonspecific Connective Tissue Disorders).
[So] Source:Am J Cardiol;120(7):1214-1219, 2017 Oct 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1913
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aortic stiffness measured by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in connective tissue disorder (CTD) patients has been previously shown to be abnormal and to be associated with adverse aortic outcomes. The rate of increase in aortic stiffness with normal aging has been previously described. However, longitudinal changes in aortic stiffness have not been characterized in CTD patients. We examined longitudinal changes in CMR-derived aortic stiffness in children and young adults with CTDs. A retrospective analysis of 50 children and young adults (median age, 20 years; range, 0.2 to 49; 40% < 18 years old) with a CTD, and with at least 2 CMR examinations (total 152 examinations) over a median duration of 3.9 (1 to 13.2) years was performed. Aortic stiffness measures (strain, distensibility, and ß stiffness index) were calculated on each examination at the aortic root (AoR), ascending aorta, and descending aorta. Longitudinal changes in parameters were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. Aortic strain and distensibility decreased with age, whereas the ß stiffness index increased at all aortic segments. The average rates of decline in distensibility (x10 mm Hg per 10-year increase in age) were 0.7, 1.3, and 1 at the AoR, ascending aorta, and descending aorta, respectively. The rates of decline in distensibility were not associated with the rates of AoR dilation or surgical AoR replacement. In conclusion, on serial CMR measurements in children and young adults with CTDs, aortic stiffness progressively increased with age, with rates of change only slightly higher than those previously reported in healthy adults.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aorta, Thoracic/pathology
Aorta/pathology
Connective Tissue Diseases/diagnosis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine/methods
Vascular Stiffness
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aorta/physiopathology
Aorta, Thoracic/physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Connective Tissue Diseases/physiopathology
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/diagnosis
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome/physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Loeys-Dietz Syndrome/diagnosis
Loeys-Dietz Syndrome/physiopathology
Male
Marfan Syndrome/diagnosis
Marfan Syndrome/physiopathology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170914
[Lr] Last revision date:170914
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170816
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28686325
[Au] Autor:Schilter KF; Steiner JE; Demos W; Maheshwari M; Prokop JW; Worthey E; Drolet BA; Siegel DH
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
[Ti] Title:RNF213 variants in a child with PHACE syndrome and moyamoya vasculopathy.
[So] Source:Am J Med Genet A;173(9):2557-2561, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1552-4833
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Segmental infantile hemangiomas (IH) can be associated with congenital anomalies in a regional distribution. PHACE refers to large cervicofacial segmental IH in association with congenital anomalies of the aortic arch and medium-sized arteries of the head and neck, as well as structural anomalies of the posterior fossa and eye. A subset of PHACE patients have arterial anomalies that progress to moyamoya vasculopathy (MMV). MMV is defined as stenosis of the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid arteries and/or their major branches, with subsequent development of a compensatory collateral vessel network. We describe a patient with MMV and segmental IH on the back and lower body who meets diagnostic criteria for PHACE based on a posterior segment eye anomaly and cerebral arterial anomalies. Whole exome sequencing demonstrated two inherited heterozygous variants in RNF213. Variants in RNF213 are associated with increased susceptibility to MMV. Our findings suggest that RNF213 variants may play a role in the development of MMV in patients with hemangioma syndromes associated with congenital cerebral arterial anomalies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170817
[Lr] Last revision date:170817
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/ajmg.a.38258

  7 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28669502
[Au] Autor:Alsoufi B; McCracken C; Shashidharan S; Deshpande S; Kanter K; Kogon B
[Ad] Address:Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: balsoufi@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:The Impact of 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome on Surgical Repair Outcomes of Conotruncal Cardiac Anomalies.
[So] Source:Ann Thorac Surg;104(5):1597-1604, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6259
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We aim to describe the impact of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) on clinical characteristics, postoperative course, and early and late outcomes of neonates undergoing surgery for conotruncal anomalies. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed (2002 to 2012) of 224 neonates who underwent surgery for interrupted aortic arch (n = 67), truncus arteriosus (n = 85), or ductal-dependent pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect (n = 72). Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, n = 119, no genetic syndrome; group 2, n = 64, 22q11DS; and group 3, n = 41, other genetic syndrome. Adjusted analysis to compare outcomes was performed. RESULTS: In comparison with group 1, group 2 had longer mechanical ventilation duration (148 versus 102 hours, p = 0.008), intensive care unit stay (268 versus 159 hours, p < 0.001), and hospital stay (19.3 versus 11.5 days, p < 0.001). On adjusted analysis, there was an insignificant increase in unplanned reoperation (odds ratio [OR] 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7 to 8.4, p = 0.167) but no increased extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 0.3 to 6.1, p = 0.612), hospital mortality (OR 0.6, 95% CI: 0.1 to 3.3, p = 0.570), or decreased late survival (hazard ratio 0.9, 95% CI: 0.4 to 2.1, p = 0.822). In comparison with group 1, group 3 had longer mechanical ventilation duration (190 versus 102 hours, p < 0.001), intensive care unit stay (236 versus 159 hours, p = 0.007), and hospital stay (21.5 versus 11.5 days, p < 0.001); and increased unplanned reoperation (OR 3.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 12.5, p = 0.032), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use (OR 4.4, 95% CI: 1.1 to 17.6, p = 0.038), hospital mortality (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.2 to 14.5, p = 0.021), and diminished late survival (hazard ratio 4.0, 95% CI: 2.1 to 8.1, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In neonates with conotruncal anomalies, 22q11DS is associated with prolonged recovery and increased resource utilization. However, despite a small increase in unplanned reoperation, there is no significant impact on early or late survival. In comparison, other genetic syndromes are associated with increased unplanned reoperation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use, hospital mortality, and diminished late survival. These findings are important for family counseling and risk stratification.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods
Cause of Death
DiGeorge Syndrome/epidemiology
Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology
Heart Defects, Congenital/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cardiac Surgical Procedures/mortality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
DiGeorge Syndrome/diagnosis
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital/diagnosis
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Male
Odds Ratio
Postoperative Care/methods
Postoperative Complications/mortality
Postoperative Complications/physiopathology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171109
[Lr] Last revision date:171109
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170704
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28616347
[Au] Autor:Fernández Suárez FE; Fernández Del Valle D; González Alvarez A; Pérez-Lozano B
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Central University Hospital of Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Intraoperative care for aortic surgery using circulatory arrest.
[So] Source:J Thorac Dis;9(Suppl 6):S508-S520, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2072-1439
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The total circulatory arrest (CA) is necessary to achieve optimal surgical conditions in certain aortic pathologies, especially in those affecting the ascending aorta and aortic arch. During this procedure it is necessary to protect all the organs of ischemia, especially those of the central nervous system and for this purpose several strategies have been developed. The first and most important protective method is systemic hypothermia. The degree of hypothermia and the route of application have been evolving and currently tend to use moderate hypothermia (MH) (20.1-28 °C) associated with unilateral or bilateral selective cerebral perfusion methods. In this way the neurological results are better, the interval of security is greater and the times of extracorporeal circulation are smaller. Even so, it is necessary to take into account that there is the possibility of ischemia in the lower part of the body, especially of the abdominal viscera and the spinal cord, therefore the time of circulatory stop should be limited and not to exceed 80 minutes. Evidence of possible neurological drug protection is very weak and only mannitol, magnesium, and statins can produce some benefit. Inhalational anesthetics and some intravenous seem to have advantages, but more studies would be needed to test their long-term benefit. Other important parameters to be monitored during these procedures are blood glucose, anemia and coagulation disorders and acid-base balance. The recommended monitoring is common in complex cardiovascular procedures and it is of special importance the neurological monitoring that can be performed with several techniques, although currently the most used are Bispectral Index (BIS) and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). It is also essential to monitor the temperature routinely at the nasopharyngeal and bladder level and it is important to control coagulation with rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21037/jtd.2017.04.67

  9 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28598570
[Au] Autor:van Nisselrooij AEL; Rozendaal L; Linskens I; Clur SA; Hruda J; Pajkrt E; van Velzen CL; Blom NA; Haak MC
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Fetal Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden.
[Ti] Title:The outcome of isolated prenatal ventricular size disproportion in the absence of aortic coarctation.
[So] Source:Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol;, 2017 Jun 09.
[Is] ISSN:1469-0705
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Ventricular size disproportion is a marker for aortic coarctation (CoA) in fetal life, however, approximately 50% of fetuses do not develop CoA after birth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the postnatal outcome of cases with ventricular disproportion in the absence of CoA in this cohort. METHODS: All cases with prenatal isolated ventricular size disproportion in the period 2002-2015 were extracted from a prenatal congenital heart defects (CHD) registry of a regional cohort. Cases were assigned to a group without aortic arch anomalies (non-CoA) or to the group with CoA (CoA). Postnatal outcome of non-CoA cases was evaluated by assessing the presence of cardiac and other congenital malformations, genetic syndromes and other morbidity after birth. Non-CoA cases were subdivided in a group without and a group with cardiovascular pathology requiring medication or intervention. RESULTS: Seventy-seven cases were identified of which 46 (60%) did not develop CoA (non-CoA). Thirty-five cases (35/46) did not require cardiovascular intervention or medication, whereas in 11 cases (11/46) did. In the non-CoA cases 6/46 presented with clinical pulmonary hypertension requiring treatment after birth. Cardiac defects were present 24/46 cases. Syndromic features were seen in 4/46 cases. Overall, 43% of all non-CoA children are still under surveillance at the end of the study period. CONCLUSIONS: The postnatal course of cases with fetal ventricular size disproportion is complicated by prenatally undetected congenital defects (61%) and pulmonary or transition problems (35%) in a significant number of non-CoA cases. Proper monitoring of these cases is therefore warranted and it is advisable to incorporate the risks for additional morbidity and neonatal complications in prenatal counseling.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170613
[Lr] Last revision date:170613
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/uog.17543

  10 / 3007 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28582472
[Au] Autor:Baratto L; Park SY; Hatami N; Davidzon G; Srinivas S; Gambhir SS; Iagaru A
[Ad] Address:Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:18F-FDG silicon photomultiplier PET/CT: A pilot study comparing semi-quantitative measurements with standard PET/CT.
[So] Source:PLoS One;12(6):e0178936, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate if the new Discovery Molecular Insights (DMI) PET/CT scanner provides equivalent results compared to the standard of care PET/CT scanners (GE Discovery 600 or GE Discovery 690) used in our clinic and to explore any possible differences in semi-quantitative measurements. METHODS: The local Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Between September and November 2016, 50 patients underwent a single 18F-FDG injection and two scans: the clinical standard PET/CT followed immediately by the DMI PET/CT scan. We measured SUVmax and SUVmean of different background organs and up to four lesions per patient from data acquired using both scanners. RESULTS: DMI PET/CT identified all the 107 lesions detected by standard PET/CT scanners, as well as additional 37 areas of focal increased 18F-FDG uptake. The SUVmax values for all 107 lesions ranged 1.2 to 14.6 (mean ± SD: 2.8 ± 2.8), higher on DMI PET/CT compared with standard of care PET/CT. The mean lesion:aortic arch SUVmax ratio and mean lesion:liver SUVmax ratio were 0.2-15.2 (mean ± SD: 3.2 ± 2.6) and 0.2-8.5 (mean ± SD: 1.9 ± 1.4) respectively, higher on DMI PET/CT than standard PET/CT. These differences were statistically significant (P value < 0.0001) and not correlated to the delay in acquisition of DMI PET data (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows high performance of the new DMI PET/CT scanner. This may have a significant role in diagnosing and staging disease, as well as for assessing and monitoring responses to therapies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/pharmacokinetics
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/instrumentation
Radiopharmaceuticals/pharmacokinetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aorta/diagnostic imaging
Aorta/pathology
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Kidney Neoplasms/pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Optical Devices
Pilot Projects
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods
Sarcoidosis/diagnostic imaging
Sarcoidosis/pathology
Silicon
Tonsillar Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Tonsillar Neoplasms/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Radiopharmaceuticals); 0Z5B2CJX4D (Fluorodeoxyglucose F18); Z4152N8IUI (Silicon)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170919
[Lr] Last revision date:170919
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170606
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0178936


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