Database : MEDLINE
Search on : arbovirus and infections [Words]
References found : 4096 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 410 go to page                         

  1 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29408661
[Au] Autor:Sas MA; Vina-Rodriguez A; Mertens M; Eiden M; Emmerich P; Chaintoutis SC; Mirazimi A; Groschup MH
[Ad] Address:Institute of Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Greifswald - Isle of Riems, Germany.
[Ti] Title:A one-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR for the universal detection of all currently known CCHFV genotypes.
[So] Source:J Virol Methods;255:38-43, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0984
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a fatal disease in humans, which is endemic in many countries of Africa, Southern Asia and Southeastern Europe. It is caused by the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), which is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) transmitted by ixodid ticks, mainly of the genus Hyalomma. Animals like hares, hedgehogs, cattle, camels and small ruminants can become infected without developing clinical signs. Seroconversion occurs after a short viremia of up to two weeks, and thus seroprevalence studies in ruminants can be used to reveal risk areas for the human population. Virus detection by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is essential to prove an actual circulation of CCHFV in a country and is also used as diagnostic method for acute human CCHFV infections. In this study, a new universal one-step multiplex real-time RT-qPCR for the sensitive and specific detection of CCHFV is presented. For this purpose, 14 new primers and 2 probes were simultaneously used to detect RNAs representing all six CCHFV genotypes. Additionally, a GC-mirrored sequence within the synthetic RNAs enables the discrimination between true positive samples and unintentional laboratory contaminations. CCHFV negative samples from different animal species and ten different members of the order Bunyavirales were eventually tested to reveal the specificity of the new RT-qPCR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29274845
[Au] Autor:Pattnaik A; Palermo N; Sahoo BR; Yuan Z; Hu D; Annamalai AS; Vu HLX; Correas I; Prathipati PK; Destache CJ; Li Q; Osorio FA; Pattnaik AK; Xiang SH
[Ad] Address:School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA.
[Ti] Title:Discovery of a non-nucleoside RNA polymerase inhibitor for blocking Zika virus replication through in silico screening.
[So] Source:Antiviral Res;151:78-86, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1872-9096
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging arbovirus, has become a major human health concern globally due to its association with congenital abnormalities and neurological diseases. Licensed vaccines or antivirals against ZIKV are currently unavailable. Here, by employing a structure-based approach targeting the ZIKV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), we conducted in silico screening of a library of 100,000 small molecules and tested the top ten lead compounds for their ability to inhibit the virus replication in cell-based in vitro assays. One compound, 3-chloro-N-[({4-[4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)-1-piperazinyl]phenyl}amino)carbonothioyl]-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (TPB), potently inhibited ZIKV replication at sub-micromolar concentrations. Molecular docking analysis suggests that TPB binds to the catalytic active site of the RdRp and therefore likely blocks the viral RNA synthesis by an allosteric effect. The IC and the CC of TPB in Vero cells were 94 nM and 19.4 µM, respectively, yielding a high selective index of 206. In in vivo studies using immunocompetent mice, TPB reduced ZIKV viremia significantly, indicating TPB as a potential drug candidate for ZIKV infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29216368
[Au] Autor:Flies EJ; Weinstein P; Anderson SJ; Koolhof I; Foufopoulos J; Williams CR
[Ad] Address:School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia.
[Ti] Title:Ross River Virus and the Necessity of Multiscale, Eco-epidemiological Analyses.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;217(5):807-815, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Zoonotic vector-borne disease prevalence is affected by vector, human, and reservoir host factors, which are influenced by habitat and climate; these 5 components interact on microhabitat-to-landscape scales but are often analyzed at a single spatial scale. Methods: We present an information theoretic, multiscale, multiple regression analysis of the ecological drivers of Ross River virus. We analyze the spatial pattern of 20 years of Ross River virus infections from South Australia (1992-2012; n = 5261), using variables across these 5 components of disease ecology at 3 spatial scales. Results: We found that covariate importance depended on the spatial scale of the analysis; some biotic variables were more important at fine scales and some abiotic variables were more important at coarser spatial scales. The urban score of an area was most predictive of infections, and mosquito variables did not improve the explanatory power of these models. Conclusions: Through this multiscale analysis, we identified novel drivers of the spatial distribution of disease and recommend public health interventions. Our results underline that single-scale analyses may paint an incomplete picture of disease drivers, potentially creating a major flaw in epidemiological analyses. Multiscale, ecological analyses are needed to better understand infectious disease transmission.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix615

  4 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512482
[Au] Autor:Stewart-Ibarra AM; Ryan SJ; Kenneson A; King CA; Abbott M; Barbachano-Guerrero A; Beltrán-Ayala E; Borbor-Cordova MJ; Cárdenas WB; Cueva C; Finkelstein JL; Lupone CD; Jarman RG; Maljkovic Berry I; Mehta S; Polhemus M; Silva M; Endy TP
[Ad] Address:Center for Global Health and Translational Sciences, State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York.
[Ti] Title:The Burden of Dengue Fever and Chikungunya in Southern Coastal Ecuador: Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, and Phylogenetics from the First Two Years of a Prospective Study.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Here, we report the findings from the first 2 years of an arbovirus surveillance study conducted in Machala, Ecuador, a dengue-endemic region (2014-2015). Patients with suspected dengue virus (DENV) infections (index cases, = 324) were referred from five Ministry of Health clinical sites. A subset of DENV-positive index cases ( = 44) were selected, and individuals from the index household and four neighboring homes within 200 m were recruited ( = 400). Individuals who entered the study, other than the index cases, are referred to as associates. In 2014, 70.9% of index cases and 35.6% of associates had acute or recent DENV infections. In 2015, 28.3% of index cases and 12.8% of associates had acute or recent DENV infections. For every DENV infection captured by passive surveillance, we detected an additional three acute or recent DENV infections in associates. Of associates with acute DENV infections, 68% reported dengue-like symptoms, with the highest prevalence of symptomatic acute infections in children aged less than 10 years. The first chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections were detected on epidemiological week 12 in 2015; 43.1% of index cases and 3.5% of associates had acute CHIKV infections. No Zika virus infections were detected. Phylogenetic analyses of isolates of DENV from 2014 revealed genetic relatedness and shared ancestry of DENV1, DENV2, and DENV4 genomes from Ecuador with those from Venezuela and Colombia, indicating the presence of viral flow between Ecuador and surrounding countries. Enhanced surveillance studies, such as this, provide high-resolution data on symptomatic and inapparent infections across the population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.17-0762

  5 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29511073
[Au] Autor:Mishra N; Caciula A; Price A; Thakkar R; Ng J; Chauhan LV; Jain K; Che X; Espinosa DA; Montoya Cruz M; Balmaseda A; Sullivan EH; Patel JJ; Jarman RG; Rakeman JL; Egan CT; Reusken CBEM; Koopmans MPG; Harris E; Tokarz R; Briese T; Lipkin WI
[Ad] Address:Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA nm2641@cumc.columbia.edu wil2001@cumc.columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:Diagnosis of Zika Virus Infection by Peptide Array and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.
[So] Source:MBio;9(2), 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Zika virus (ZIKV) is implicated in fetal stillbirth, microcephaly, intracranial calcifications, and ocular anomalies following vertical transmission from infected mothers. In adults, infection may trigger autoimmune inflammatory polyneuropathy. Transmission most commonly follows the bite of infected mosquitoes but may also occur through sexual intercourse or receipt of blood products. Definitive diagnosis through detection of viral RNA is possible in serum or plasma within 10 days of disease onset, in whole blood within 3 weeks of onset, and in semen for up to 3 months. Serological diagnosis is nonetheless critical because few patients have access to molecular diagnostics during the acute phase of infection and infection may be associated with only mild or inapparent disease that does not prompt molecular testing. Serological diagnosis is confounded by cross-reactivity of immune sera with other flaviviruses endemic in the areas where ZIKV has recently emerged. Accordingly, we built a high-density microarray comprising nonredundant 12-mer peptides that tile, with one-residue overlap, the proteomes of Zika, dengue, yellow fever, West Nile, Ilheus, Oropouche, and chikungunya viruses. Serological analysis enabled discovery of a ZIKV NS2B 20-residue peptide that had high sensitivity (96.0%) and specificity (95.9%) versus natural infection with or vaccination against dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, West Nile, tick-borne encephalitis, or Japanese encephalitis virus in a microarray assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of early-convalescent-phase sera (2 to 3 weeks after onset of symptomatic infection). The emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) as a teratogen is a profound challenge to global public health. Molecular diagnosis of infection is straightforward during the 3-week period when patients are viremic. However, serological diagnosis thereafter of historical exposure has been confounded by cross-reactivity. Using high-density peptide arrays that tile the proteomes of a selection of flaviviruses to identify a ZIKV-specific peptide, we established two assays that enable sensitive and specific diagnosis of exposure to ZIKV. These assays may be useful in guiding clinical management of mothers at risk for potential exposure to ZIKV and enable insights into the epidemiology of ZIKV infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29243225
[Au] Autor:Esposito DLA; de Moraes JB; Antônio Lopes da Fonseca B
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Current priorities in the Zika response.
[So] Source:Immunology;153(4):435-442, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2567
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Zika virus (ZIKV), a single-stranded RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family, is an arbovirus (viruses transmitted by arthropods) transmitted to humans and non-human primates through the bites of infected female Aedes sp. mosquitoes. Although first isolated in 1947, it only recently emerged as a global threat, present in several countries resulting in a pandemic scenario. ZIKV infections may have severe outcomes, such as neurological impairment, and with the intrinsic ability of inducing microcephaly in fetuses of infected pregnant women, the virus has become a major public health problem. This review discusses some advances in diagnosis; vaccine development and the problems associated with their administration; the importance of the cross-reactivity with other flaviviruses in protecting or worsening the disease; the implications of the recent outbreak caused by the virus in the world; and future prospects for the complete understanding of this disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/imm.12878

  7 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29339224
[Au] Autor:Eckerle I; Briciu VT; Ergönül Ö; Lupse M; Papa A; Radulescu A; Tsiodras S; Tsitou C; Drosten C; Nussenblatt VR; Reusken CB; Sigfrid LA; Beeching NJ
[Ad] Address:Institute of Virology, University of Bonn Medical Centre, Bonn, Germany. Electronic address: eckerle@virology-bonn.de.
[Ti] Title:Emerging souvenirs-clinical presentation of the returning traveller with imported arbovirus infections in Europe.
[So] Source:Clin Microbiol Infect;24(3):240-245, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1469-0691
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Arboviruses are an emerging group of viruses that are causing increasing health concerns globally, including in Europe. Clinical presentation usually consists of a nonspecific febrile illness that may be accompanied by rash, arthralgia and arthritis, with or without neurological or haemorrhagic syndromes. The range of differential diagnoses of other infectious and noninfectious aetiologies is broad, presenting a challenge for physicians. While knowledge of the geographical distribution of pathogens and the current epidemiological situation, incubation periods, exposure risk factors and vaccination history can help guide the diagnostic approach, the nonspecific and variable clinical presentation can delay final diagnosis. AIMS AND SOURCES: This narrative review aims to summarize the main clinical and laboratory-based findings of the three most common imported arboviruses in Europe. Evidence is extracted from published literature and clinical expertise of European arbovirus experts. CONTENT: We present three cases that highlight similarities and differences between some of the most common travel-related arboviruses imported to Europe. These include a patient with chikungunya virus infection presenting in Greece, a case of dengue fever in Turkey and a travel-related case of Zika virus infection in Romania. IMPLICATIONS: Early diagnosis of travel-imported cases is important to reduce the risk of localized outbreaks of tropical arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya and the risk of local transmission from body fluids or vertical transmission. Given the global relevance of arboviruses and the continuous risk of (re)emerging arbovirus events, clinicians should be aware of the clinical syndromes of arbovirus fevers and the potential pitfalls in diagnosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29274465
[Au] Autor:Reusken CB; Ieven M; Sigfrid L; Eckerle I; Koopmans M
[Ad] Address:Department of Viroscience, WHO Collaborating Center for Arboviruses and Viral Haemorrhagic Fever Reference and Research, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: C.Reusken@erasmusmc.nl.
[Ti] Title:Laboratory preparedness and response with a focus on arboviruses in Europe.
[So] Source:Clin Microbiol Infect;24(3):221-228, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1469-0691
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The global health burden of arboviruses is continuously rising, which results in increasing pressure on local and (inter)national laboratory infrastructures. Timely and accurate diagnosis of cases is one of the main pillars for public health and clinical responses to an arbovirus emergence. AIMS AND SOURCES: This narrative review aims to summarize recent advances and to identify needs in laboratory preparedness and response activities, with a focus on viruses transmitted by arthropods in Europe. The review is based on evidence extracted from PubMed searches, Public Health and clinical laboratory experiences from the authors and the authors' opinions substantiated by peer-reviewed scientific literature. CONTENT: We illustrate the importance of inter-epidemic laboratory preparedness activities to ensure adequate Public Health and clinical responses. We describe the status of arbovirus endemicity and emergence in Europe thereby highlighting the need for preparedness for these viruses. We discuss the components and pitfalls of an adequate laboratory preparedness and response and the broader context of the current landscape of international research, clinical and laboratory preparedness networks. The complexity of arbovirus laboratory preparedness and response is described. IMPLICATIONS: Outbreak preparedness plans need to look beyond national reference laboratories, to include first-line responding onsite hospital laboratories and plans for strengthening of such local capacity and capability as required depending on the nature of the outbreak. In particular, the diagnosis of arbovirus infections is complicated by the existence of geographic overlap of circulation of numerous arboviruses, the overlap in clinical manifestation between many arboviruses and other aetiologies and the existence of cross-reactivity between related arboviruses in serology testing. Inter-epidemic preparedness activities need strong national and international networks addressing these issues. However, the current mushrooming of European preparedness networks requires governance to bring the European preparedness and response to a next level.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29481868
[Au] Autor:Boyer S; Calvez E; Chouin-Carneiro T; Diallo D; Anna-Bella F
[Ad] Address:Institut Pasteur of Cambodia, Unit of Medical Entomology, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
[Ti] Title:An overview of mosquito vectors of Zika virus.
[So] Source:Microbes Infect;, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1769-714X
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The mosquito-borne arbovirus Zika virus (ZIKV, Flavivirus, Flaviviridae), has caused an outbreak impressive by its magnitude and rapid spread. First detected in Uganda in Africa in 1947, from where it spread to Asia in the 1960s, it emerged in 2007 on the Yap Island in Micronesia and hit most islands in the Pacific region in 2013. Subsequently, ZIKV was detected in the Caribbean, and Central and South America in 2015, and reached North America in 2016. Although ZIKV infections are in general asymptomatic or causing mild self-limiting illness, severe symptoms have been described including neurological disorders and microcephaly in newborns. To face such an alarming health situation, WHO has declared Zika as an emerging global health threat. This review summarizes the literature on the main vectors of ZIKV (sylvatic and urban) across all the five continents with special focus on vector competence studies. Zika virus (ZIKV, Flavivirus, Flaviviridae) has caused an outbreak impressive by its magnitude and rapid spread. This review summarizes the literature on the main vectors of ZIKV (sylvatic and urban) across all the five continents with special focus on vector competence studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 4096 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29364889
[Au] Autor:Cui L; Pang J; Lee YH; Ooi EE; Ong CN; Leo YS; Tannenbaum SR
[Ad] Address:Infectious Diseases Interdisciplinary Research Group, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research & Technology (SMART), Singapore, Singapore.
[Ti] Title:Serum metabolome changes in adult patients with severe dengue in the critical and recovery phases of dengue infection.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(1):e0006217, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dengue virus (DENV) is the most prevalent arbovirus leading to an estimated 100 million symptomatic dengue infections every year. DENV can cause a spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from mild dengue fever (DF) to more life threatening forms such as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). The clinical symptoms of DHF become evident typically at the critical phase of infection (5-7 days after onset of fever), yet the mechanisms that trigger transition from DF to DHF are not well understood. We performed a mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling of sera from adult DF and DHF patients at the critical and recovery phases of infection. There were 29 differentially expressed metabolites identified between DF and DHF at the critical phase. These include bile acids, purines, acylcarnitines, phospholipids, and amino acids. Bile acids were observed up to 5 fold higher levels among DHF compared to DF patients and were significantly correlated to the higher levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT), suggestive of liver injury among DHF. Uric acid, the most abundant antioxidant in the blood, was observed to be 1.5 fold lower among DHF compared to DF patients. This could result in decreased capacity of endogenous antioxidant defense and elevated oxidative stress among DHF patients. In the recovery phase, the levels of eight metabolites were still significantly higher or lower among DHF patients, including chenodeoxyglycocholic acid, one of the bile acids observed at the critical phase. This indicates potential prolonged adverse impact on the liver due to DENV infection in DHF patients. Our study identified altered metabolic pathways linked to DHF in the critical and recovery phases of dengue infection and provided insights into the different host and DENV interactions between DF and DHF. The results advance our understanding on the mechanisms of DHF pathogenesis, alluding to possible novel therapeutic targets to dengue management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006217


page 1 of 410 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information