Database : MEDLINE
Search on : auditory and perceptual and disorders [Words]
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Cardoso, Ana Cláudia Vieira

[PMID]: 29236907
[Au] Autor:Picoloto LA; Cardoso ACV; Cerqueira AV; Oliveira CMC
[Ad] Address:Faculdade de Filosofia e Ciências da Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP - Marília (SP), Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Efeito da retroalimentação auditiva atrasada na gagueira com e sem alteração do processamento auditivo central. Effect of delayed auditory feedback on stuttering with and without central auditory processing disorders.
[So] Source:Codas;29(6):e20170038, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por; eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To verify the effect of delayed auditory feedback on speech fluency of individuals who stutter with and without central auditory processing disorders. METHODS: The participants were twenty individuals with stuttering from 7 to 17 years old and were divided into two groups: Stuttering Group with Auditory Processing Disorders (SGAPD): 10 individuals with central auditory processing disorders, and Stuttering Group (SG): 10 individuals without central auditory processing disorders. Procedures were: fluency assessment with non-altered auditory feedback (NAF) and delayed auditory feedback (DAF), assessment of the stuttering severity and central auditory processing (CAP). Phono Tools software was used to cause a delay of 100 milliseconds in the auditory feedback. The "Wilcoxon Signal Post" test was used in the intragroup analysis and "Mann-Whitney" test in the intergroup analysis. RESULTS: The DAF caused a statistically significant reduction in SG: in the frequency score of stuttering-like disfluencies in the analysis of the Stuttering Severity Instrument, in the amount of blocks and repetitions of monosyllabic words, and in the frequency of stuttering-like disfluencies of duration. Delayed auditory feedback did not cause statistically significant effects on SGAPD fluency, individuals with stuttering with auditory processing disorders. CONCLUSION: The effect of delayed auditory feedback in speech fluency of individuals who stutter was different in individuals of both groups, because there was an improvement in fluency only in individuals without auditory processing disorder.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Auditory Perceptual Disorders/physiopathology
Stuttering/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Feedback, Sensory/physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Perception/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29442165
[Au] Autor:Uloza V; Latoszek BBV; Ulozaite-Staniene N; Petrauskas T; Maryn Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania.
[Ti] Title:A comparison of Dysphonia Severity Index and Acoustic Voice Quality Index measures in differentiating normal and dysphonic voices.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(4):949-958, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the feasibility and robustness of the Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) and the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) in diagnostic accuracy, differentiating normal and dysphonic voices. METHODS: A group of 264 subjects with normal voices (n = 105) and with various voice disorders (n = 159) were asked to read aloud a text and to sustain the vowel /a/. Both speech tasks were concatenated, and perceptually rated for dysphonia severity by five voice clinicians. They rated the Grade (G) and the overall dysphonia severity with a visual analog scale (VAS). All concatenated voice samples were acoustically analyzed to receive an AVQI score. For DSI analysis, the required voice parameters were obtained from the sustained phonation of the vowel /a/. RESULTS: The results achieved significant and marked concurrent validity between both auditory-perceptual judgment procedures and both acoustic voice measures. The DSI threshold (i.e., DSI = 3.30) pertaining to G obtained reasonable sensitivity of 85.8% and specificity of 83.4%. For VAS , the DSI threshold of 3.30 was determined also with reasonable sensitivity of 70.3% and excellent specificity of 93.9%. Also, the AVQI threshold (i.e., AVQI = 3.31) pertaining to G demonstrated reasonable sensitivity of 78.1% and excellent specificity of 92.0%. For VAS , an AVQI threshold of 3.33 was determined with excellent sensitivity of 97.0% and reasonable specificity of 81.8%. CONLUSION: The outcomes of the present study indicate comparable results between DSI and AVQI with a high level of validity to discriminate between normal and dysphonic voices. However, a higher level of accuracy was yielded for AVQI as a correlate of auditory perceptual judgment suggesting a reliable voice screening potential of AVQI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4903-x

  3 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29407275
[Au] Autor:Cogné M; Violleau MH; Klinger E; Joseph PA
[Ad] Address:Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, University Hospital of Bordeaux and EA4136, University of Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Rehabilitation Medicine Unit, Raymond Poincaré Hospital, 92380 Garches, France. Electronic address: melaniecogne@hotmail.fr.
[Ti] Title:Influence of non-contextual auditory stimuli on navigation in a virtual reality context involving executive functions among patients after stroke.
[So] Source:Ann Phys Rehabil Med;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1877-0665
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Topographical disorientation is frequent among patients after a stroke and can be well explored with virtual environments (VEs). VEs also allow for the addition of stimuli. A previous study did not find any effect of non-contextual auditory stimuli on navigational performance in the virtual action planning-supermarket (VAP-S) simulating a medium-sized 3D supermarket. However, the perceptual or cognitive load of the sounds used was not high. OBJECTIVE: We investigated how non-contextual auditory stimuli with high load affect navigational performance in the VAP-S for patients who have had a stroke and any correlation between this performance and dysexecutive disorders. METHODS: Four kinds of stimuli were considered: sounds from living beings, sounds from supermarket objects, beeping sounds and names of other products that were not available in the VAP-S. The condition without auditory stimuli was the control. The Groupe de réflexion pour l'évaluation des fonctions exécutives (GREFEX) battery was used to evaluate executive functions of patients. RESULTS: The study included 40 patients who have had a stroke (n=22 right-hemisphere and n=18 left-hemisphere stroke). Patients' navigational performance was decreased under the 4 conditions with non-contextual auditory stimuli (P<0.05), especially for those with dysexecutive disorders. For the 5 conditions, the lower the performance, the more GREFEX tests were failed. Patients felt significantly disadvantaged by the non-contextual sounds sounds from living beings, sounds from supermarket objects and names of other products as compared with beeping sounds (P<0.01). Patients' verbal recall of the collected objects was significantly lower under the condition with names of other products (P<0.001). Left and right brain-damaged patients did not differ in navigational performance in the VAP-S under the 5 auditory conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These non-contextual auditory stimuli could be used in neurorehabilitation paradigms to train patients with dysexecutive disorders to inhibit disruptive stimuli.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29398218
[Au] Autor:Cassidy CM; Balsam PD; Weinstein JJ; Rosengard RJ; Slifstein M; Daw ND; Abi-Dargham A; Horga G
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA; The Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, 1145 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K1Z 7K4, Canada.
[Ti] Title:A Perceptual Inference Mechanism for Hallucinations Linked to Striatal Dopamine.
[So] Source:Curr Biol;28(4):503-514.e4, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0445
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hallucinations, a cardinal feature of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, are known to depend on excessive striatal dopamine. However, an underlying cognitive mechanism linking dopamine dysregulation and the experience of hallucinatory percepts remains elusive. Bayesian models explain perception as an optimal combination of prior expectations and new sensory evidence, where perceptual distortions such as illusions and hallucinations may occur if prior expectations are afforded excessive weight. Such excessive weight of prior expectations, in turn, could stem from a gain-control process controlled by neuromodulators such as dopamine. To test for such a dopamine-dependent gain-control mechanism of hallucinations, we studied unmedicated patients with schizophrenia with varying degrees of hallucination severity and healthy individuals using molecular imaging with a pharmacological manipulation of dopamine, structural imaging, and a novel task designed to measure illusory changes in the perceived duration of auditory stimuli under different levels of uncertainty. Hallucinations correlated with a perceptual bias, reflecting disproportional gain on expectations under uncertainty. This bias could be pharmacologically induced by amphetamine, strongly correlated with striatal dopamine release, and related to cortical volume of the dorsal anterior cingulate, a brain region involved in tracking environmental uncertainty. These findings outline a novel dopamine-dependent mechanism for perceptual modulation in physiological conditions and further suggest that this mechanism may confer vulnerability to hallucinations in hyper-dopaminergic states underlying psychosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29205707
[Au] Autor:Meerschman I; Van Lierde K; Van Puyvelde C; Bostyn A; Claeys S; D'haeseleer E
[Ad] Address:Department of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Massed versus spaced practice in vocology: effect of a short-term intensive voice training versus a longer-term traditional voice training.
[So] Source:Int J Lang Commun Disord;53(2):393-404, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1460-6984
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In contrast with most medical and pharmaceutical therapies, the optimal dosage for voice therapy or training is unknown. AIMS: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a short-term intensive voice training (IVT) with a longer-term traditional voice training (TVT) on the vocal quality and vocal capacities of vocally healthy non-professional voice users. METHODS & PROCEDURES: A pre-/post-test randomized control group design with follow-up measurements was used. Twenty healthy female non-professional voice users with a mean age of 21.7 years (range = 20-24 years) were randomly assigned into a short-term IVT group (n = 10) or a longer-term TVT group (n = 10). Both groups received an identical 6-h lasting voice training. Only the distribution of practice varied between the groups: 2 h a day for 3 consecutive days for the IVT group versus two 30-min sessions a week for 6 weeks for the TVT group. In both groups, a voice assessment protocol consisting of subjective (questionnaire, participant's self-report, auditory-perceptual evaluation) and objective (maximum performance task, acoustic analysis, voice range profile, dysphonia severity index) measurements and determinations was used to evaluate the participants' voice pre- and post-training and at 6 weeks follow-up. Groups were compared over time using linear mixed models and generalized linear mixed models. Within-group effects of time were determined using post-hoc pairwise comparisons with Bonferroni corrections. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: No significant time-by-group interactions were found for any of the outcome measures, indicating no significant differences in evolution over time between the groups. Significant time effects were found for maximum phonation time, lowest intensity, lowest frequency, highest frequency and dysphonia severity index, all improving over time in both groups. More in-depth within-group analyses indicate a preference for the IVT group regarding the evolution of maximum phonation time, lowest frequency and dysphonia severity index, and a preference for the TVT group regarding the evolution of lowest intensity. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: Short-term IVT may be equally, or even more, effective in training vocally healthy non-professional voice users compared with longer-term TVT.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/1460-6984.12358

  6 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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Silvério, Kelly Cristina Alves
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[PMID]: 29361337
[Au] Autor:Ribeiro VV; de Oliveira AG; da Silva Vitor J; Siqueira LTD; Moreira PAM; Brasolotto AG; Silverio KCA
[Ad] Address:Speech Hearing and Language Disorders Department of the Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo-FOB/USP, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:The Effect of a Voice Therapy Program Based on the Taxonomy of Vocal Therapy in Women with Behavioral Dysphonia.
[So] Source:J Voice;, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4588
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study aims to propose and analyze the effect of a voice therapy program (VTP) in women with behavioral dysphonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a controlled, blinded, and nonrandomized cohort study. Participants of this study were 22 women with behavioral dysphonia divided into two groups: G1, 11 women with behavioral dysphonia who received the VTP, and G2, 11 women with behavioral dysphonia who did not receive any intervention. Before and after 6 weeks, the outcome variables evaluated in both groups were auditory-perceptual evaluation of the global degree of vocal quality (vowel /a/ and counting), instrumental acoustic parameters, Voice-Related Quality of Life, vocal and larynx symptoms, and musculoskeletal pain. The statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney tests (P < 0.05). RESULTS: After 6 weeks, we observed a significantly higher improvement in the general degree of vocal deviation in vowels, a reduced F0 and symptom of "fatigue while talking" in G1, and an increased "shoulder" pain intensity in G2. Both groups showed improvement in the socioemotional domain of Voice-Related Quality of Life. In addition, the comparison between the groups showed a significantly greater reduction in fundamental frequency and the "voice loss" symptom in G1 compared with G2. CONCLUSIONS: The VTP using semioccluded vocal tract exercises obtained a positive effect on voice quality, symptoms, and musculoskeletal pain in women with behavioral dysphonia. The proposal, based on the taxonomy of voice therapy, seems to have promoted a phonatory balance, muscle relaxation, and improvement in the vocal resistance of this population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29439168
[Au] Autor:Lee S; Rony P; Galia A
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, 8410501, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Visual Aversive Learning Compromises Sensory Discrimination.
[So] Source:J Neurosci;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1529-2401
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aversive learning is thought to modulate perceptual thresholds, which can lead to over-generalization. However, it remains undetermined if this modulation is domain specific or a general effect. Moreover, despite the unique role of the visual modality in human perception, it is unclear whether this aspect of aversive learning exists in this modality. The current study was designed to examine the effect of visual aversive outcomes on perception of basic visual and auditory features. We tested the ability of healthy participants, both males and females, to discriminate between neutral stimuli, before and after visual learning. In each experiment, neutral stimuli were associated with aversive images in an experimental group and with neutral images in a control group. Participants demonstrated a deterioration in discrimination (higher discrimination thresholds) only after aversive learning. This deterioration was measured for both auditory (tone frequency) and visual (orientation and contrast) features. The effect was replicated in five different experiments and lasted for at least 24 hours. fMRI neural responses and pupil size were also measured during learning. We showed an increase in neural activations in the anterior cingulate cortex, insula, and amygdala during aversive compared to neutral learning. Interestingly, the early visual cortex showed increased brain activity during aversive compared to neutral context trials, with identical visual information. Our findings imply the existence of a central multi-modal mechanism, which modulates early perceptual properties, following exposure to negative situations. Such a mechanism could contribute to abnormal responses that underlie anxiety states, even in new and safe environments. Using a visual aversive learning paradigm, we found deteriorated discrimination abilities for visual and auditory stimuli, associated with visual aversive stimuli. We showed increased neural activations in the anterior cingulate cortex, insula, and amygdala during aversive compared to neutral learning. Importantly, similar findings were also evident in the early visual cortex during trials with aversive/neutral context, but with identical visual information. The demonstration of this phenomena in the visual modality is important, as it provides support to the notion that aversive learning can influence perception via a central mechanism, independent of input modality. Given the dominance of the visual system in human perception, our findings hold relevance to daily life, as well as imply a potential etiology for anxiety-disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438910
[Au] Autor:Isaksson S; Salomäki S; Tuominen J; Arstila V; Falter-Wagner CM; Noreika V
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Is there a generalized timing impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorders across time scales and paradigms?
[So] Source:J Psychiatr Res;99:111-121, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1379
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Individuals with ASD have abnormal motor and perceptual functions that do not currently form diagnostic criteria of ASD, but nevertheless may affect everyday behaviour. Temporal processing seems to be one of such non-diagnostic yet impaired domains, although the lack of systematic studies testing different aspects of timing in the same sample of participants prevents a conclusive assessment of whether there is a generalized temporal deficit in ASD associated with diagnostic symptoms. 17 children diagnosed with ASD and 18 typically developing age- and IQ-matched controls carried out a set of motor and perceptual timing tasks: free tapping, simultaneity judgment, auditory duration discrimination, and verbal duration estimation. Parents of participants filled in a questionnaire assessing the sense and management of time. Children with ASD showed faster and more variable free tapping than controls. Auditory duration discrimination thresholds were higher in the ASD group than controls in a sub-second version of the task, while there were no group differences in a supra-second discrimination of intervals. Children with ASD showed more variable thresholds of simultaneity judgment, and they received lower parental scores for their sense and management of time. No group differences were observed in the verbal duration estimation task in the minute-range. Different timing functions were correlated in the ASD group but not among controls, whilst several timing measures correlated with ASD symptoms. We conclude that children with ASD show a broad range of abnormalities in temporal processing tasks including motor timing, perceptual timing, and temporal perspective.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29395103
[Au] Autor:Hay-McCutcheon MJ; Peterson NR; Pisoni DB; Kirk KI; Yang X; Parton J
[Ad] Address:The University of Alabama, Department of Communicative Disorders, Speech and Hearing Center, Box 870242, United States. Electronic address: mhaymccu@ua.edu.
[Ti] Title:Performance variability on perceptual discrimination tasks in profoundly deaf adults with cochlear implants.
[So] Source:J Commun Disord;, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7994
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance on two challenging listening tasks, talker and regional accent discrimination, and to assess variables that could have affected the outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective study using 35 adults with one cochlear implant (CI) or a CI and a contralateral hearing aid (bimodal hearing) was conducted. Adults completed talker and regional accent discrimination tasks. METHODS: Two-alternative forced-choice tasks were used to assess talker and accent discrimination in a group of adults who ranged in age from 30 years old to 81 years old. RESULTS: A large amount of performance variability was observed across listeners for both discrimination tasks. Three listeners successfully discriminated between talkers for both listening tasks, 14 participants successfully completed one discrimination task and 18 participants were not able to discriminate between talkers for either listening task. Some adults who used bimodal hearing benefitted from the addition of acoustic cues provided through a HA but for others the HA did not help with discrimination abilities. Acoustic speech feature analysis of the test signals indicated that both the talker speaking rate and the fundamental frequency (F0) helped with talker discrimination. For accent discrimination, findings suggested that access to more salient spectral cues was important for better discrimination performance. CONCLUSIONS: The ability to perform challenging discrimination tasks successfully likely involves a number of complex interactions between auditory and non-auditory pre- and post-implant factors. To understand why some adults with CIs perform similarly to adults with normal hearing and others experience difficulty discriminating between talkers, further research will be required with larger populations of adults who use unilateral CIs, bilateral CIs and bimodal hearing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 10580 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29341346
[Au] Autor:Wren Y; Harding S; Goldbart J; Roulstone S
[Ad] Address:Bristol Speech and Language Therapy Research Unit, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK.
[Ti] Title:A systematic review and classification of interventions for speech-sound disorder in preschool children.
[So] Source:Int J Lang Commun Disord;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1460-6984
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Multiple interventions have been developed to address speech sound disorder (SSD) in children. Many of these have been evaluated but the evidence for these has not been considered within a model which categorizes types of intervention. The opportunity to carry out a systematic review of interventions for SSD arose as part of a larger scale study of interventions for primary speech and language impairment in preschool children. AIMS: To review systematically the evidence for interventions for SSD in preschool children and to categorize them within a classification of interventions for SSD. METHODS & PROCEDURES: Relevant search terms were used to identify intervention studies published up to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: participants were aged between 2 years and 5 years, 11 months; they exhibited speech, language and communication needs; and a primary outcome measure of speech was used. Studies that met inclusion criteria were quality appraised using the single case experimental design (SCED) or PEDro-P, depending on their methodology. Those judged to be high quality were classified according to the primary focus of intervention. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: The final review included 26 studies. Case series was the most common research design. Categorization to the classification system for interventions showed that cognitive-linguistic and production approaches to intervention were the most frequently reported. The highest graded evidence was for three studies within the auditory-perceptual and integrated categories. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: The evidence for intervention for preschool children with SSD is focused on seven out of 11 subcategories of interventions. Although all the studies included in the review were good quality as defined by quality appraisal checklists, they mostly represented lower-graded evidence. Higher-graded studies are needed to understand clearly the strength of evidence for different interventions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180124
[Lr] Last revision date:180124
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/1460-6984.12371


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