Database : MEDLINE
Search on : bifidobacteriales and infections [Words]
References found : 62 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 7 go to page                  

  1 / 62 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28694023
[Au] Autor:Rong Y; Dong Z; Hong Z; Jin Y; Zhang W; Zhang B; Mao W; Kong H; Wang C; Yang B; Gao X; Song Z; Green SE; Song HK; Wang H; Lu Y
[Ad] Address:Comprehensive Liver Cancer Center, Beijing 302 Hospital, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Reactivity toward Bifidobacterium longum and Enterococcus hirae demonstrate robust CD8 T cell response and better prognosis in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.
[So] Source:Exp Cell Res;358(2):352-359, 2017 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2422
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Recent studies suggest that several bacterial species are involved in tumor immunosurveillance and antitumor immunity. The role of bacteria in immune responses in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients is still unknown. In this study, we examined the bacteria-reactive CD8 T cell response in patients with HBV-related HCC. We found that circulating CD8 T cells from healthy individuals demonstrated minimal or zero specificity toward a series of commensals and bacteria previously associated with antitumor effects, including Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium longum, Bacteroides fragilis, and Enterococcus hirae. In contrast, the circulating CD8 T cells from HBV-related HCC patients presented significantly elevated bacteria-reactive responses, albeit with high variations among different HCC individuals. Reactivity toward bacteria was also identified in tumor-infiltrating CD8 T cells. These bacteria-reactive responses were not primarily induced by TLR ligand, but were dependent on the presence of antigen-presenting monocytes, and were MHC class I-restricted. Interestingly, we observed that the CD8 T cell-to-Foxp3 regulatory T cell ratio was positively correlated with the proportions of Bifidobacterium longum-reactive and Enterococcus hirae-reactive CD8 T cells, while the frequency of PD-1 CD8 T cells was negatively correlated with the frequency of Enterococcus hirae-reactive CD8 T cells. Furthermore, the disease-free survival time of HCC patients after tumor resection was positively correlated with the frequencies of Bifidobacterium longum-reactive and Enterococcus hirae-reactive CD8 T cells. Together, these results suggested that certain bacterial species might present valuable antitumor effects.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bifidobacteriales Infections/immunology
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology
Enterococcus hirae
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/immunology
Hepatitis B virus
Liver Neoplasms/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/immunology
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/virology
Forkhead Transcription Factors/metabolism
Humans
Liver Neoplasms/immunology
Liver Neoplasms/virology
Prognosis
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology
T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/virology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Forkhead Transcription Factors)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171018
[Lr] Last revision date:171018
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170712
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 28108392
[Au] Autor:Bhaskar MM; Sistla S; Kumaravel S
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research(JIPMER), Pondicherry, India.
[Ti] Title:A case of pyometrocolpos with Bifidobacterium species.
[So] Source:Anaerobe;44:48-50, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8274
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bifidobacterium species, a normal commensal of the human gastrointestinal tract, female genitourinary tract and vagina is usually considered non-pathogenic and is being used therapeutically as probiotic due to its beneficial effects. However, there are several case reports implicating Bifidobacteria as the causative agent in various infectious conditions. Infections with Bifidobacteria are often ignored or underreported as they are part of the normal gut microbiome. Here we discuss a case of pyometrocolpos with Bifidobacterium species. Clinical outcome of the patient was good after emergency drainage and antibiotic treatment with Cefoperazone sulbactam and Metronidazole.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bifidobacteriales Infections/diagnosis
Bifidobacteriales Infections/microbiology
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Pyometra/diagnosis
Pyometra/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage
Bifidobacteriales Infections/pathology
Bifidobacteriales Infections/therapy
Cefoperazone/administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Drainage
Female
Humans
Metronidazole/administration & dosage
Pyometra/pathology
Pyometra/therapy
Sulbactam/administration & dosage
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 140QMO216E (Metronidazole); 7U75I1278D (Cefoperazone); S4TF6I2330 (Sulbactam)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170424
[Lr] Last revision date:170424
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170122
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 27736791
[Au] Autor:Schiavi E; Gleinser M; Molloy E; Groeger D; Frei R; Ferstl R; Rodriguez-Perez N; Ziegler M; Grant R; Moriarty TF; Plattner S; Healy S; O'Connell Motherway M; Akdis CA; Roper J; Altmann F; van Sinderen D; O'Mahony L
[Ad] Address:Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research (SIAF), University of Zürich, Davos, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:The Surface-Associated Exopolysaccharide of Bifidobacterium longum 35624 Plays an Essential Role in Dampening Host Proinflammatory Responses and Repressing Local TH17 Responses.
[So] Source:Appl Environ Microbiol;82(24):7185-7196, 2016 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5336
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The immune-modulating properties of certain bifidobacterial strains, such as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum 35624 (B. longum 35624), have been well described, although the strain-specific molecular characteristics associated with such immune-regulatory activity are not well defined. It has previously been demonstrated that B. longum 35624 produces a cell surface exopolysaccharide (sEPS), and in this study, we investigated the role played by this exopolysaccharide in influencing the host immune response. B. longum 35624 induced relatively low levels of cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells, whereas an isogenic exopolysaccharide-negative mutant derivative (termed sEPS ) induced vastly more cytokines, including interleukin-17 (IL-17), and this response was reversed when exopolysaccharide production was restored in sEPS by genetic complementation. Administration of B. longum 35624 to mice of the T cell transfer colitis model prevented disease symptoms, whereas sEPS did not protect against the development of colitis, with associated enhanced recruitment of IL-17 lymphocytes to the gut. Moreover, intranasal administration of sEPS also resulted in enhanced recruitment of IL-17 lymphocytes to the murine lung. These data demonstrate that the particular exopolysaccharide produced by B. longum 35624 plays an essential role in dampening proinflammatory host responses to the strain and that loss of exopolysaccharide production results in the induction of local T 17 responses. IMPORTANCE: Particular gut commensals, such as B. longum 35624, are known to contribute positively to the development of mucosal immune cells, resulting in protection from inflammatory diseases. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms for these commensal-host interactions are poorly described. In this report, an exopolysaccharide was shown to be decisive in influencing the immune response to the bacterium. We generated an isogenic mutant unable to produce exopolysaccharide and observed that this mutation caused a dramatic change in the response of human immune cells in vitro In addition, the use of mouse models confirmed that lack of exopolysaccharide production induces inflammatory responses to the bacterium. These results implicate the surface-associated exopolysaccharide of the B. longum 35624 cell envelope in the prevention of aberrant inflammatory responses.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bifidobacteriales Infections/immunology
Bifidobacterium longum/immunology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial/immunology
Th17 Cells/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bifidobacteriales Infections/microbiology
Bifidobacterium longum/genetics
Cytokines/immunology
Female
Humans
Interleukin-17/immunology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cytokines); 0 (Interleukin-17); 0 (Polysaccharides, Bacterial)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171107
[Lr] Last revision date:171107
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161014
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27664734
[Au] Autor:Sarkar A; Mandal S
[Ad] Address:School of Chemistry and Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, The University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN, UK. Electronic address: amrita08sarkar@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Bifidobacteria-Insight into clinical outcomes and mechanisms of its probiotic action.
[So] Source:Microbiol Res;192:159-71, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1618-0623
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The invasion of pathogens causes a disruption of the gut homeostasis. Innate immune responses and those triggered by endogenous microbiota form the first line of defence in our body. Pathogens often successfully overcome the resistances offered, calling for therapeutic intervention. Conventional strategy involving antibiotics might eradicate pathogens, but often leave the gut uncolonised and susceptible to recurrences. Probiotic supplements are useful alternatives. Bifidobacterium is one of widely studied probiotic genus, effective in restoring gut homeostasis. Mechanisms of probiotic action of bifidobacteria are several, often with strain-specificity. Analysis of streamlined literature reports reveal that although most studies report the probiotic aspect of bifidobacteria, sporadic documented contradictory results exist, challenging its therapeutic application and prompting studies to unambiguously establish the strain-associated probiotic activity and negate adverse effects prior to its clinical administration. Multi-strain/combinatorial therapy possibly relies on a combination of underlying operating mechanisms, each contributing towards enhanced probiotic efficacy, understanding which could help in developing customised formulations against targeted pathogens. Bifidogenic activity is also mediated by surface-associated structural components such as exopolysaccharides, lipoteichoic acids along with metabolites and bifidocins. This highlights scope for developing advanced structural therapeutic strategy which might be pivotal in replacing intact cell probiotics therapy.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bifidobacteriales Infections/microbiology
Bifidobacterium/physiology
Host-Pathogen Interactions
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bifidobacteriales Infections/therapy
Cell Wall/physiology
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Homeostasis
Humans
Immunomodulation
Intestinal Mucosa/immunology
Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism
Intestinal Mucosa/microbiology
Microbial Interactions
Probiotics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170406
[Lr] Last revision date:170406
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160925
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 27242672
[Au] Autor:Falentin H; Rault L; Nicolas A; Bouchard DS; Lassalas J; Lamberton P; Aubry JM; Marnet PG; Le Loir Y; Even S
[Ad] Address:Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, UMR 1253 STLORennes, France; Agrocampus Ouest, UMR 1253 STLORennes, France.
[Ti] Title:Bovine Teat Microbiome Analysis Revealed Reduced Alpha Diversity and Significant Changes in Taxonomic Profiles in Quarters with a History of Mastitis.
[So] Source:Front Microbiol;7:480, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1664-302X
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mastitis is a mammary gland inflammatory disease often due to bacterial infections. Like many other infections, it used to be considered as a host-pathogen interaction driven by host and bacterial determinants. Until now, the involvement of the bovine mammary gland microbiota in the host-pathogen interaction has been poorly investigated, and mainly during the infectious episode. In this study, the bovine teat microbiome was investigated in 31 quarters corresponding to 27 animals, which were all free of inflammation at sampling time but which had different histories regarding mastitis: from no episode of mastitis on all the previous lactations (Healthy quarter, Hq) to one or several clinical mastitis events (Mastitic quarter, Mq). Several quarters whose status was unclear (possible history of subclinical mastitis) were classified as NDq. Total bacterial DNA was extracted from foremilk samples and swab samples of the teat canal. Taxonomic profiles were determined by pyrosequencing on 16s amplicons of the V3-4 region. Hq quarters showed a higher diversity compared to Mq ones (Shannon index: ~8 and 6, respectively). Clustering of the quarters based on their bacterial composition made it possible to separate Mq and Hq quarters into two separate clusters (C1 and C2, respectively). Discriminant analysis of taxonomic profiles between these clusters revealed several differences and allowed the identification of taxonomic markers in relation to mastitis history. C2 quarters were associated with a higher proportion of the Clostridia class (including genera such as Ruminococcus, Oscillospira, Roseburia, Dorea, etc.), the Bacteroidetes phylum (Prevotella, Bacteroides, Paludibacter, etc.), and the Bifidobacteriales order (Bifidobacterium), whereas C1 quarters showed a higher proportion of the Bacilli class (Staphylococcus) and Chlamydiia class. These results indicate that microbiota is altered in udders which have already developed mastitis, even far from the infectious episode. Microbiome alteration may have resulted from the infection itself and or the associated antibiotic treatment. Alternatively, differences in microbiome composition in udders with a history of mastitis may have occurred prior to the infection and even contributed to infection development. Further investigations on the dynamics of mammary gland microbiota will help to elucidate the contribution of this endogenous microbiota to the mammary gland health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160601
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00480

  6 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 26291071
[Au] Autor:Avcin SL; Pokorn M; Kitanovski L; Premru MM; Jazbec J
[Ti] Title:Bifidobacterium breve Sepsis in Child with High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;21(9):1674-5, 2015 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteremia/diagnosis
Bifidobacteriales Infections/diagnosis
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Probiotics/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bacteremia/etiology
Bifidobacteriales Infections/etiology
Child, Preschool
Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
Intestines/microbiology
Male
Microbiota
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150821
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2109.150097

  7 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 26231653
[Au] Autor:Milani C; Mancabelli L; Lugli GA; Duranti S; Turroni F; Ferrario C; Mangifesta M; Viappiani A; Ferretti P; Gorfer V; Tett A; Segata N; van Sinderen D; Ventura M
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Probiogenomics, Department of Life Sciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Exploring Vertical Transmission of Bifidobacteria from Mother to Child.
[So] Source:Appl Environ Microbiol;81(20):7078-87, 2015 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5336
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Passage through the birth canal and consequent exposure to the mother's microbiota is considered to represent the initiating event for microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of the newborn. However, a precise evaluation of such suspected vertical microbiota transmission has yet to be performed. Here, we evaluated the microbiomes of four sample sets, each consisting of a mother's fecal and milk samples and the corresponding infant's fecal sample, by means of amplicon-based profiling supported by shotgun metagenomics data for two key samples. Notably, targeted genome reconstruction from microbiome data revealed vertical transmission of a Bifidobacterium breve strain and a Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum strain from mother to infant, a notion confirmed by strain isolation and genome sequencing. Furthermore, PCR analyses targeting unique genes from these two strains highlighted their persistence in the infant gut at 6 months. Thus, this study demonstrates the existence of specific bifidobacterial strains that are common to mother and child and thus indicative of vertical transmission and that are maintained in the infant for at least relatively short time spans.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bifidobacteriales Infections/transmission
Bifidobacterium/classification
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bifidobacterium/genetics
DNA, Bacterial/chemistry
DNA, Bacterial/genetics
Feces/microbiology
Genome, Bacterial
Humans
Microbiota
Milk, Human/microbiology
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, DNA
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Bacterial)
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150802
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1128/AEM.02037-15

  8 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25921690
[Au] Autor:Weber E; Reynaud Q; Suy F; Gagneux-Brunon A; Carricajo A; Guillot A; Botelho-Nevers E
[Ad] Address:Infectious Diseases Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne.
[Ti] Title:Bifidobacterium species bacteremia: risk factors in adults and infants.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;61(3):482-4, 2015 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteremia/drug therapy
Bifidobacteriales Infections/microbiology
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Enterocolitis, Necrotizing/prevention & control
Infant, Premature, Diseases/microbiology
Probiotics/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:COMMENT; LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150430
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/civ347

  9 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25472946
[Au] Autor:Bertelli C; Pillonel T; Torregrossa A; Prod'hom G; Fischer CJ; Greub G; Giannoni E
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Microbial Genomics, Institute of Microbiology, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics.
[Ti] Title:Bifidobacterium longum bacteremia in preterm infants receiving probiotics.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;60(6):924-7, 2015 Mar 15.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Administration of probiotics to premature newborns has been shown to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis and reduce all-cause mortality. In our hospital, we documented 2 cases of Bifidobacterium longum subspecies infantis bacteremia in newborns receiving probiotics. By comparative genomics, we confirmed that the strains isolated from each patient originated from the probiotics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteremia/drug therapy
Bifidobacteriales Infections/microbiology
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Enterocolitis, Necrotizing/prevention & control
Infant, Premature, Diseases/microbiology
Probiotics/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage
Bifidobacterium/pathogenicity
Enterocolitis, Necrotizing/microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature/blood
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Phylogeny
Probiotics/therapeutic use
Sequence Analysis, DNA
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1512
[Cu] Class update date: 150303
[Lr] Last revision date:150303
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/ciu946

  10 / 62 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25402825
[Au] Autor:Zbinden A; Zbinden R; Berger C; Arlettaz R
[Ad] Address:Institute of Medical Microbiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Case series of Bifidobacterium longum bacteremia in three preterm infants on probiotic therapy.
[So] Source:Neonatology;107(1):56-9, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1661-7819
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The use of probiotics as prophylaxis for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is being increasingly practised. OBJECTIVE: We report, for the first time, a case series of 3 preterm, very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants who developed bacteremia with Bifidobacterium longum on probiotic therapy with Infloran® containing viable B. longum. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed data of 3 infants (of gestational age <30 weeks and birth weight <1,230 g). They were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Clinical data were retrieved from their medical records. RESULTS: In infants 1 and 2, B. longum was isolated from the blood cultures when they were on probiotic therapy with Infloran or shortly after, respectively, and was interpreted as transient bacteremia. The clinical presentation of these infants did not require antibiotic treatment after the isolation of B. longum. Infant 3 developed an NEC despite probiotic therapy with Infloran and the blood cultures showed B. longum growth. This infant required explorative laparotomy and antibiotic treatment. The clinical isolates of B. longum and the strain of the Infloran capsule showed an identical profile on biochemical, mass-spectrometric and molecular analyses, suggesting a direct correlation between the administration of probiotics and bacteremia with B. longum in all 3 infants. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of bacteremia with bifidobacteria after its prophylactic administration in VLBW infants and its possible clinical consequences are a matter of concern. In the interests of safety, the use of probiotics in such a population should be indicated with caution and requires further investigation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteremia
Bifidobacteriales Infections
Bifidobacterium/isolation & purification
Enterocolitis, Necrotizing/prevention & control
Probiotics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Bacteremia/diagnosis
Bacteremia/etiology
Bacteremia/physiopathology
Bifidobacteriales Infections/diagnosis
Bifidobacteriales Infections/etiology
Bifidobacteriales Infections/physiopathology
Dietary Supplements/adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Male
Probiotics/administration & dosage
Probiotics/adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Cu] Class update date: 141216
[Lr] Last revision date:141216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000367985


page 1 of 7 go to page                  
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information