Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29462767
[Au] Autor:Martz ME; Zucker RA; Schulenberg JE; Heitzeg MM
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, 4250 Plymouth Road, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA. Electronic address: mmartz@umich.edu.
[Ti] Title:Psychosocial and neural indicators of resilience among youth with a family history of substance use disorder.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:198-206, 2018 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding the combined influence of psychosocial and neural protective mechanisms against substance use. The present study examined the extent to which neuroimaging measures of disinhibition predicted resilience against binge drinking and marijuana use among youth with a family history of substance use disorder (SUD; FH+), accounting for psychosocial measures of behavioral control. METHODS: Participants were 57 FH+ youth from the Michigan Longitudinal Study categorized into resilient and high-risk groups based on patterns of weekly binge drinking and monthly marijuana use during early adulthood. Psychosocial measures of behavioral control (reactive control and externalizing behavior during early and late adolescence) and neural measures of disinhibition (Go/No-Go task and Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT) measured through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) were entered sequentially in hierarchical logistic regression models to predict resilient versus high-risk groups. RESULTS: Greater activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during correctly inhibited trials on the Go/No-Go task was a significant predictor of resilience (OR = 2.46, p < 0.05), over and above greater reactive control in early adolescence (OR = 4.96, p < 0.05) and lower externalizing behavior in late adolescence (OR = 0.64, p < 0.05). Neural activation in the ventral striatum associated with reward anticipation during the MIDT was not a significant predictor of resilience. CONCLUSIONS: Brain function in the right DLPFC associated with inhibitory control may be a neural indicator of resilience against elevated substance use among FH+ youth, even after accounting for psychosocial measures of behavioral control.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29523719
[Au] Autor:Guleria S; Faber MT; Hansen BT; Arnheim-Dahlstrm L; Liaw KL; Munk C; Nygrd M; Kjr SK
[Ad] Address:Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Self-perceived risk of STIs in a population-based study of Scandinavian women.
[So] Source:Sex Transm Infect;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1472-3263
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study examined the associations between current behaviours/characteristics and self-perceived risk for STIs, among randomly selected women aged 18-45 years from Denmark, Norway and Sweden. METHOD: A population-based, cross-sectional, questionnaire study (paper based, web based and telephone based) was conducted during 2011-2012. We compared medium-high STI risk perception with no/low risk perception. The associations were explored for women who had ever had sexual intercourse and for women with a new partner in the last 6 months using multivariable logistic regression. RESULT: The overall prevalence of medium-high STI risk perception was 7.4%. It was highest among women aged 18-24 years (16.2%) and among the Danish women (8.8%). Number of new sexual partners in the last 6 months (≥3vs 0 partners, OR 14.94, 95% CI 13.20 to 16.94) was strongly associated with medium-high STI risk perception. Among women with a new partner in the last 6 months, lack of condom use increased medium-high STI risk perception (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.52 to 1.96). Genital warts in the last year, binge drinking and being single were associated with increased risk perception and remained statistically significant after additional adjustments were made for number of new partners and condom use with new partners in the last 6 months. CONCLUSION: Subjective perception of risk for STI was associated with women's current risk-taking behaviours, indicating women generally are able to assess their risks for STIs. However, a considerable proportion of women with multiple new partners in the last 6 months and no condom use still considered themselves at no/low risk for STI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 4987 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520802
[Au] Autor:Ortiz AP; Gonzlez D; Ramos J; Muoz C; Reyes JC; Prez CM
[Ad] Address:Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan, Puerto Rico.
[Ti] Title:Association of marijuana use with oral HPV infection and periodontitis among Hispanic adults: Implications for oral cancer prevention.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Despite limited data, research suggests that marijuana use is associated with oral HPV infection and periodontitis, two potential oropharyngeal cancer risk factors. We assessed these associations in a Hispanic adult population in Puerto Rico. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 735 adults assessed marijuana use, determined through an audio computer-assisted self-interview, and periodontitis and self-collection of oral HPV samples following the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey methodology. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology definition was used for periodontitis. HPV typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction with modified L1 consensus primers (MY09/MY11). RESULTS: 26.5% of adults reported lifetime use of marijuana, 2.7% were frequent users (lifetime use ≥ 26 times, past year use ≥ 6 times, and past 30-day use ≥2 times), 5.7% had oral HPV infection, and 20.1% had severe periodontitis. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that frequent marijuana users were more likely to have severe periodontitis (OR=2.91, 95%CI=1.06 - 7.96) than never/once lifetime users after adjusting for age, sex, healthcare coverage, smoking, binge drinking, number of oral sex partners, and oral HPV infection. However, frequent marijuana use was not associated with oral HPV infection. CONCLUSION: Marijuana use was associated with periodontitis, but not with oral HPV infection. Further evaluation of the role of marijuana use in oral HPV infection and periodontitis may inform novel preventive public health strategies, as marijuana users could be at increased risk of oral cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0372

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[PMID]: 29519883
[Au] Autor:Sanz-Barbero B; Lpez Pereira P; Barrio G; Vives-Cases C
[Ad] Address:National School of Public Health, Institute of Health "Carlos III", Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Intimate partner violence against young women: prevalence and associated factors in Europe.
[So] Source:J Epidemiol Community Health;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1470-2738
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The magnitude of intimate partner violence (IPV) in young women is a source of increasing concern. The prevalence of IPV has not been analysed in Europe as a whole. The objective was to assess the prevalence and main characteristics of experiencing physical and/or sexual and psychological-only IPV among young women in the European Union and to identify individual and contextual associated risk factors. METHODS: We analysed a cross-sectional subsample of 5976 ever-partnered women aged 18-29 years from the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights Violence Against Women Survey, 2012. The main outcomes were current physical and/or sexual IPV and lifetime psychological-only IPV. Risk factors were assessed by the prevalence ratio (PR) from multilevel Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Current prevalence of physical and/or sexual IPV was 6.1%, lifetime prevalence of psychological-only IPV was 28.7%. Having suffered physical and/or sexual abuse by an adult before age 15 was the strongest risk factor for IPV (PR: 2.9 for physical and/or sexual IPV, PR: 1.5 for psychological-only IPV). Other individual risk factors were: perceived major difficulties in living within their household income (PR: 2.6), having children (PR: 1.8) and age 18-24 years (PR: 1.5) for physical/sexual IPV and immigration background for psychological-only IPV (PR: 1.4). Living in countries with a higher prevalence of binge drinking or early school dropout was positively associated with IPV. CONCLUSIONS: Findings show that the fight against violence in young women should consider individual characteristics, childhood experiences of abuse and also structural interventions including reduction of alcohol consumption and improvement in the education-related indicators.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29519167
[Au] Autor:Documet PI; Troyer MM; Macia L
[Ad] Address:1 University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Social Support, Health, and Health Care Access Among Latino Immigrant Men in an Emerging Community.
[So] Source:Health Educ Behav;:1090198118763870, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1552-6127
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of social support with alcohol abuse, depression, and health care access among Latino immigrant men in an emerging Latino community (an area with a small yet growing Latino population). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data of 140 men prior to a participatory male-to-male community health worker intervention among Latino immigrants were analyzed using logistic regression. Community health workers recruited community participants in Western Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2013. RESULTS: Participants constituted a vulnerable group: 47% had not finished high school, 36% had moderate to severe depression, and 30% reported binge drinking in the past month. Health care access was low (insurance = 6%, usual source = 20%). In multivariable logistic regression high social support was associated with less binge drinking (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.20, 0.98]) and lower depression (OR = 0.22; 95% CI [0.09-0.54]). Social support was associated with having a dentist visit but not with other health care access measures. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that the role of social support seems important for drinking and depression but remains controversial for health care access. It raises the hypothesis that low social support may be one of the mechanisms for the increase in drinking that happens after immigration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1090198118763870

  6 / 4987 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517944
[Au] Autor:Barr T; Sureshchandra S; Ruegger P; Zhang J; Ma W; Borneman J; Grant K; Messaoudi I
[Ad] Address:a Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California-Riverside , Riverside , CA , USA.
[Ti] Title:Concurrent gut transcriptome and microbiota profiling following chronic ethanol consumption in nonhuman primates.
[So] Source:Gut Microbes;:1-44, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1949-0984
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Alcohol use disorder (AUD) results in increased intestinal permeability, nutrient malabsorption, and increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these morbidities remains limited because studies to date have relied almost exclusively on short-term heavy/binge drinking rodent models and colonic biopsies/fecal samples collected from AUD subjects with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Consequently, the dose- and site-dependent impact of chronic alcohol consumption in the absence of overt liver disease remains poorly understood. In this study, we addressed this knowledge gap using a nonhuman primate model of voluntary ethanol self-administration where rhesus macaques consume varying amounts of 4% ethanol in water for 12 months. Specifically, we performed RNA-Seq and 16S rRNA gene sequencing on duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon biopsies collected from 4 controls and 8 ethanol-consuming male macaques. Our analysis revealed that chronic ethanol consumption leads to changes in the expression of genes involved in protein trafficking, metabolism, inflammation, and CRC development. Additionally, we observed differences in the relative abundance of putatively beneficial bacteria as well as those associated with inflammation and CRC. Given that the animals studied in this manuscript did not exhibit signs of ALD or CRC, our data suggest that alterations in gene expression and bacterial communities precede clinical disease and could serve as biomarkers as well as facilitate future studies aimed at developing interventions to restore gut homeostasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/19490976.2018.1441663

  7 / 4987 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29393499
[Au] Autor:Go MJ; Noh JR; Hwang JH; Kim KS; Choi DH; Lee JS; Kim YH; Lee CH
[Ad] Address:Laboratory Animal Resource Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Small heterodimer partner deficiency exacerbates binge drinkinginduced liver injury via modulation of natural killer T cell and neutrophil infiltration.
[So] Source:Mol Med Rep;17(4):4989-4998, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1791-3004
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Binge drinking among alcohol consumers is a common occurrence, and may result in the development of numerous diseases, including liver disorders. It has previously been reported that natural killer T (NKT) cells induce alcoholassociated liver injury by promoting neutrophil infiltration. In the present study, the role of the orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP), which is encoded by the NR0B2 gene, in acute binge drinkinginduced liver injury was investigated. SHPknockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) control mice were intragastrically administered single doses of alcohol. The plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase in SHPKO mice following alcohol treatment were significantly increased compared with WT mice. However, results of oil red O staining and 2',7'dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining indicated that levels of acute binge drinkingassociated hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress were not significantly different between WT and SHPKO alcoholtreated mice. Notably, tumor necrosis factorα mRNA expression in the liver of SHPKO mice was significantly increased following alcohol administration, compared with WT mice. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of CC motif chemokine ligand 2, CXC motif chemokine ligand 2 and interleukin4, which are all potent chemoattractants of NKT cells, as well as neutrophil expression levels, were significantly increased in the livers of SHPKO mice compared with WT mice following alcohol administration, as determined by reverse transcriptionquantitative polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry. Enhanced infiltration of NKT cells, determined by flow cytometry, was also demonstrated in the livers of SHPKO mice following alcohol administration, compared with WT mice. The results of the present study indicate that SHP may be involved in liverassociated protective mechanisms, with regards to the attenuation of damage caused by acute binge drinking, via regulation of NKT cell and neutrophil migration to the liver. The modulation of SHP may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute binge drinkinginduced liver injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/mmr.2018.8505

  8 / 4987 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29355641
[Au] Autor:Touchette JC; Maertens JJ; Mason MM; O'Rourke KY; Lee AM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
[Ti] Title:The nicotinic receptor drug sazetidine-A reduces alcohol consumption in mice without affecting concurrent nicotine consumption.
[So] Source:Neuropharmacology;133:63-74, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7064
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Alcohol and nicotine addiction are frequently co-morbid. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are critical for both alcohol and nicotine addiction mechanisms, since nAChR drugs that reduce nicotine consumption have been shown to also reduce alcohol consumption. Sazetidine-A, a pre-clinical nAChR drug with agonist and desensitizing effects at α42 and α7 nAChRs, has been reported to reduce alcohol consumption and nicotine self-administration in rats when administered at high doses. However, this effect has not been replicated in mice. In this study, we examined the effect of sazetidine-A on alcohol and nicotine consumption in male and female mice utilizing voluntary oral consumption procedures previously developed in our lab. We found that sazetidine-A (1 mg/kg, i.p) reduced overnight alcohol consumption, but did not affect nicotine consumption when presented either alone or concurrently with alcohol. Sazetidine-A did not reduce water or saccharin consumption at any dose tested. In a chronic co-consumption experiment in which either alcohol or nicotine was re-introduced after one week of forced abstinence, sazetidine-A attenuated post-abstinence consumption of alcohol but not nicotine. Sazetidine-A also significantly reduced alcohol consumption in an acute, binge drinking-in-the-dark procedure. Finally, we tested the effect of sazetidine-A on alcohol withdrawal, and found that sazetidine-A significantly reduced handling-induced convulsions during alcohol withdrawal. Collectively, these data suggest a novel role for the nAChR targets of sazetidine-A in specifically mediating alcohol consumption, separate from the involvement of nAChRs in mediating nicotine consumption. Delineation of this pathway may provide insight into novel therapies for the treatment of alcohol use disorders.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 4987 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425366
[Au] Autor:Woodruff SI; Hurtado SL; Simon-Arndt CM
[Ad] Address:School of Social Work, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, HH 203, San Diego, CA 92182.
[Ti] Title:U.S. Marines' Perceptions of Environmental Factors Associated With Alcohol Binge Drinking.
[So] Source:Mil Med;, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Alcohol misuse, in particular binge drinking, is a serious concern among military personnel because it is strongly associated with adverse consequences and has a deleterious effect on readiness. Although most alcohol misuse studies have focused on individual risk factors, studies are increasingly examining environmental influences and strategies for reducing alcohol risks. The purpose of this study is to address gaps in what is known about how service members' perceptions of environmental factors are related to binge drinking in the U.S. Marine Corps. Materials and Methods: The relationship between Marines' self-reports of environmental factors and alcohol binge drinking was assessed in this correlational study using data from three large Marine Corps installations drawn from the Department of Defense 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel (N = 2,933). We proposed several directional hypotheses based on existing civilian and military studies of alcohol use and misuse, as well as health behavior theory. Results: Agreement with the statements that alcoholic beverages cost too much, that drinking might negatively affect one's military career, and that one's immediate supervisor and installation discourage alcohol use were independently associated with decreased odds of binge drinking (i.e., protective factors). Perceptions that alcoholic beverages are difficult to get was particularly protective; the odds of having binged were lower for participants who endorsed this belief than for those who did not. Perceptions that drinking is part of being in one's unit was a risk factor for binge drinking (odds ratio = 1.29). Conclusion: Even after accounting for strong sociodemographic correlates, binge drinking was independently associated with a number of environmentally oriented perceptions. Beliefs that alcohol is affordable and easy to access were the strongest environmental correlates of increased risk of binge drinking. Addressing the threat alcohol misuse poses to both Marines and mission readiness will likely require multiple strategies, including both policy and environmental changes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx121

  10 / 4987 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29401326
[Au] Autor:Ursano RJ; Wang J; Fullerton CS; Ramsawh H; Gifford RK; Russell D; Cohen GH; Sampson L; Galea S
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.
[Ti] Title:Post-deployment Mental Health in Reserve and National Guard Service Members: Deploying With or Without One's Unit and Deployment Preparedness.
[So] Source:Mil Med;183(1-2):e51-e58, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Given the greater prevalence of post-deployment mental health concerns among reservists, the higher likelihood of deploying without their regular unit, and potentially lower rates of deployment preparedness, we examined associations between deploying with or without one's regular unit (individual augmentee status, IAS), deployment preparedness, and mental health problems including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression (MDD), and binge drinking in a nationally representative sample of Reserve Component (RC) Army and Marine-enlisted males (n = 705). Methods: A series of multivariate regressions examined the association of mental health with IAS and deployment preparedness, adjusting for demographics. To examine whether deployment preparedness varied by IAS, an IAS deployment preparedness interaction was included. Findings: In an adjusted model, being an individual augmentee and low deployment preparedness were associated with any mental health problem (screening positive for PTSD, MDD, binge drinking, or any combination of the three). There was a significant IAS deployment preparedness interaction. Mental health problems did not vary by preparedness among individual augmentees. Participants deploying with regular units with low-medium preparedness had greater risk for mental health problems (odds ratio [OR] = 3.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78-7.62 and OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.12-4.71), than those with high preparedness. RC-enlisted male personnel who deployed without their regular unit were five times more likely to have a mental health problem, and were 61% more likely to report binge drinking. Additionally, those with lower levels of deployment preparedness were up to three times more likely to have a mental health problem and up to six times more likely to report PTSD. Discussion: The current investigation found that both IAS and deployment preparedness were associated with negative mental health outcomes in a large representative sample of previously deployed RC-enlisted male personnel. In particular, low deployment preparedness was associated with an increased likelihood of PTSD, and deploying without one's regular unit was associated with increased rates of binge drinking. There were also significant main and interaction effects of IAS and deployment preparedness on having a mental health problem. It is possible that limiting the number of RC personnel deploying without their regular unit may help to decrease alcohol misuse among U.S. Armed Services reservists during and after future conflicts. Also, to the extent that deployment preparedness is a modifiable risk factor, future studies should examine whether increasing deployment preparedness could mitigate some of the correlates of deployment-related trauma exposure. Finally, future investigation is needed to explain why those who deploy without their regular unit, but who report high deployment preparedness, remain at elevated risk for mental health problems. It is possible that individual augmentees can benefit from a specific preparation for deployment. Those deploying without their regular unit had higher rates of mental health problems regardless of preparedness. These findings have implications for deployment preparedness training for those deploying without their regular unit.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx002


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