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[PMID]: 29510717
[Au] Autor:de Lange N; Schol P; Lancé M; Woiski M; Langenveld J; Rijnders R; Smits L; Wassen M; Henskens Y; Scheepers H
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Medical Centre Groningen, P.O. 11120, 9700 CC, Groningen, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Restrictive Versus Massive Fluid Resuscitation Strategy (REFILL study), influence on blood loss and hemostatic parameters in obstetric hemorrhage: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:Trials;19(1):166, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1745-6215
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is associated with maternal morbidity and mortality and has an increasing incidence in high-resource countries, despite dissemination of guidelines, introduction of skills training, and correction for risk factors. Current guidelines advise the administration, as fluid resuscitation, of almost twice the amount of blood lost. This advice is not evidence-based and could potentially harm patients. METHODS: All women attending the outpatient clinic who are eligible will be informed of the study; oral and written informed consent will be obtained. Where there is more than 500 ml blood loss and ongoing bleeding, patients will be randomized to care as usual, fluid resuscitation with 1.5-2 times the amount of blood loss or fluid resuscitation with 0.75-1.0 times the blood loss. Blood loss will be assessed by weighing all draping. A blood sample, for determining hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, thrombocyte concentration, and conventional coagulation parameters will be taken at the start of the study, after 60 min, and 12-18 h after delivery. In a subgroup of women, additional thromboelastometric parameters will be obtained. DISCUSSION: Our hypothesis is that massive fluid administration might lead to a progression of bleeding due to secondary coagulation disorders. In non-pregnant individuals with massive blood loss, restrictive fluid management has been shown to prevent a progression to dilution coagulopathy. These data, however, cannot be extrapolated to women in labor. Our objective is to compare both resuscitation protocols in women with early, mild PPH (blood loss 500-750 ml) and ongoing bleeding, taking as primary outcome measure the progression to severe PPH (blood loss > 1000 ml). TRIAL REGISTRATION: Netherlands Trial Register, NTR 3789 . Registered on 11 January 2013.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13063-018-2512-z

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[PMID]: 29362376
[Au] Autor:Ullman JC; Yang J; Sullivan M; Bendor J; Levy J; Pham E; Silm K; Seifikar H; Sohal VS; Nicoll RA; Edwards RH
[Ad] Address:Departments of Neurology and Physiology, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.
[Ti] Title:A mouse model of autism implicates endosome pH in the regulation of presynaptic calcium entry.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):330, 2018 01 23.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Psychoactive compounds such as chloroquine and amphetamine act by dissipating the pH gradient across intracellular membranes, but the physiological mechanisms that normally regulate organelle pH remain poorly understood. Interestingly, recent human genetic studies have implicated the endosomal Na /H exchanger NHE9 in both autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Plasma membrane NHEs regulate cytosolic pH, but the role of intracellular isoforms has remained unclear. We now find that inactivation of NHE9 in mice reproduces behavioral features of ASD including impaired social interaction, repetitive behaviors, and altered sensory processing. Physiological characterization reveals hyperacidic endosomes, a cell-autonomous defect in glutamate receptor expression and impaired neurotransmitter release due to a defect in presynaptic Ca entry. Acute inhibition of synaptic vesicle acidification rescues release but without affecting the primary defect due to loss of NHE9.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/metabolism
Autism Spectrum Disorder/metabolism
Calcium/metabolism
Endosomes/metabolism
Neurons/metabolism
Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/genetics
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/physiopathology
Autism Spectrum Disorder/genetics
Autism Spectrum Disorder/physiopathology
Behavior, Animal
Disease Models, Animal
Electroencephalography
Endosomes/pathology
Female
Gene Expression
Glutamic Acid/metabolism
Hippocampus/metabolism
Hippocampus/physiopathology
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Male
Mice
Mice, Knockout
Neurons/pathology
Presynaptic Terminals/metabolism
Presynaptic Terminals/pathology
Primary Cell Culture
Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers/deficiency
Synaptic Transmission/physiology
Synaptic Vesicles/metabolism
Synaptic Vesicles/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (NHE9 protein, mouse); 0 (Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers); 3KX376GY7L (Glutamic Acid); SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02716-5

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[PMID]: 29500384
[Au] Autor:Sun CK; Chen HY; Tseng TF; You B; Wei ML; Lu JY; Chang YL; Tseng WL; Wang TD
[Ad] Address:Department of Electrical Engineering and Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan. sun@ntu.edu.tw.
[Ti] Title:High Sensitivity of T-Ray for Thrombus Sensing.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3948, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Atherosclerotic plaque rupture or erosion and subsequent development of platelet-containing thrombus formation is the fundamental cause of cardiovascular disease, which is the most common cause of death and disability worldwide. Here we show the high sensitivity of 200-270 GHz T-ray to distinguish thrombus formation at its early stage from uncoagulated blood. A clinical observational study was conducted to longitudinally monitor the T-ray absorption constant of ex-vivo human blood during the thrombus formation from 29 subjects. Compared with the control group (28 subjects) with uncoagulated blood samples, our analysis indicates the high sensitivity of 200-270 GHz T-Ray to detect thrombus with a low p-value < 10 . Further analysis supports the significant role of platelet-activated thrombotic cascade, which modified the solvation dynamics of blood and occurred during the early coagulation stage, on the measured T-Ray absorption change. The ability to sense the thrombus formation at its early stage would hold promise for timely identification of patients at risk of various atherothrombotic disorders and save billions of lives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-22060-y

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[PMID]: 29374925
[Au] Autor:Liu W; Chai JK
[Ad] Address:Burn Institute, the First Affiliated Hospital of PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China.
[Ti] Title:[Influences of ulinastatin on acute lung injury and time phase changes of coagulation parameters in rats with burn-blast combined injuries].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi;34(1):32-39, 2018 Jan 20.
[Is] ISSN:1009-2587
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To explore the influences of ulinastatin on acute lung injury and time phase changes of coagulation parameters in rats with severe burn-blast combined injuries. One hundred and ninety-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into pure burn-blast combined injury group, ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group, and sham injury group according to the random number table, with 64 rats in each group. Two groups of rats with combined burn-blast injuries were inflicted with moderate blast injuries with the newly self-made explosive device. Then the rats were inflicted with 25% total body surface area full-thickness scald (hereinafter referred to as burn) on the back by immersing in 94 ℃ hot water for 12 s. Rats in sham injury group were sham injured on the back by immersing in 37 ℃ warm water for 12 s. Immediately after injury, rats in the three groups were intraperitoneally injected with Ringer's lactate solution (40 mL/kg), meanwhile rats in ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group were intraperitoneally injected with ulinastatin (4×10(4)U/kg), once every 12 hours, until post injury hour (PIH) 72. Before injury, at PIH 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and on post injury day (PID) 7, 8 rats in each group were selected to harvest abdominal aortic blood samples to detect plasma levels of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen, D-dimer, antithrombin â…¢ (AT-â…¢), and α2-antiplasmin (α2-AP). At PIH 24, three rats in each group which were used in detection of coagulation parameters were sacrificed to observe lung injury. At PIH 72, three rats in each group were sacrificed for histopathological observation of lung. Data were processed with analysis of variance of factorial design and least-significant difference test. (1) Compared with those of rats in sham injury group, APTT of rats in pure burn-blast combined injury group significantly prolonged at PIH 72 and on PID 7 ( <0.05 or <0.01). PT significantly prolonged at PIH 3 and 72 and significantly shortened at PIH 6 ( <0.05 or <0.01) . Fibrinogen level significantly increased from PIH 12 to PID 7 ( <0.01). AT-â…¢ level significantly decreased at PIH 6 and 12 ( <0.01), and α2-AP level significantly decreased at PIH 6 and significantly increased from PIH 24 to 72 ( <0.01). Compared with those of rats in pure burn-blast combined injury group, APTT of rats in ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group significantly prolonged at PIH 3 and 6 ( <0.01) while PT significantly shortened at PIH 3, 12, and 72 ( <0.05 or <0.01). Fibrinogen level significantly decreased at PIH 6 and 12 and significantly increased at PIH 72 ( <0.05 or <0.01). AT-â…¢ level significantly increased at PIH 3, 12, 48, and 72 ( <0.05 or <0.01), and α2-AP level significantly decreased from PIH 12 to 72 ( <0.05 or <0.01). D-dimer level of rats in sham injury group, pure burn-blast combined injury group, and ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group were respectively (0.084±0.013), (0.115±0.015), (0.158±0.022), (0.099±0.011), (0.099±0.012), (0.089±0.011), (0.124±0.014), and (0.116±0.018) µg/mL, (0.064±0.033), (0.114±0.016), (0.135±0.009), (0.060±0.008), (0.104±0.010), (0.124±0.020), (0.180±0.036), and (0.201±0.032) µg/mL, (0.074±0.013), (0.084±0.035), (0.101±0.050), (0.091±0.046), (0.096±0.034), (0.044±0.019), (0.106±0.049), and (0.118±0.047) µg/mL. Compared with that of rats in sham injury group, D-dimer level significantly decreased at PIH 6 and 12 and significantly increased from PIH 48 to PID 7 ( <0.05 or <0.01). Compared with that of rats in pure burn-blast combined injury group, D-dimer level of rats in ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group significantly decreased at PIH 3, 48, and 72, and on PID 7 ( <0.05 or <0.01). (2) At PIH 24, there was a large amount of light red effusion in the thoracic cavity, and both lung lobes were hyperemic and edematous with a small amount of blood clots in the left and middle lobe of rats in pure burn-blast combined injury group. There was a small amount of yellowish effusion in the thoracic cavity of rats in ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group, and the degree of hyperemic and edematous of bilateral lobes was lighter compared with rats in pure burn-blast combined injury group with no clot in the left lobe. No congestion, edema, or bleeding was observed in lungs of rats in sham injury group. (3) At PIH 72, disorganized alveolar structure, collapsed alveolar cavity, edematous and thickening pulmonary interstitium, infiltration of a large amount of inflammatory cells, obvious rupture of alveolar septum, and hyaline thrombus were observed in lungs of rats in pure burn-blast combined injury group. Significantly improved alveolar structure, less collapsed alveolar cavity, improved edematous pulmonary interstitium, less infiltration of inflammatory cells, rupture of alveolar septum, and no thrombus were observed in lungs of rats in ulinastatin+ burn-blast combined injury group. The lung tissue had a well-filled alveolar cavity with no interstitial edema or infiltration of inflammatory cells and no thrombosis in lungs of rats in sham injury group. Ulinastatin has positive therapeutic effects on acute lung injury in rats with severe burn-blast combined injuries through its good regulating effects on coagulation and fibrinolytic disorders caused by burn-blast combined injuries.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy
Blast Injuries/complications
Burns/complications
Glycoproteins/pharmacology
Trypsin Inhibitors/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acute Lung Injury/complications
Animals
Blast Injuries/blood
Blast Injuries/pathology
Burns/blood
Burns/pathology
Edema
Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products
Pulmonary Edema
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products); 0 (Glycoproteins); 0 (Trypsin Inhibitors); 0 (fibrin fragment D); OR3S9IF86U (urinastatin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180129
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.1009-2587.2018.01.007

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[PMID]: 29502974
[Au] Autor:Akbari E; Safari S; Hatamabadi H
[Ad] Address:Emergency Department, Imam Hosain Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:The effect of fibrinogen concentrate and fresh frozen plasma on the outcome of patients with acute traumatic coagulopathy: A quasi-experimental study.
[So] Source:Am J Emerg Med;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The debate on replacing coagulation factors and its effect on the final outcome of the patients with acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) in need of transfusion is still ongoing. Therefore, the present study is designed with the aim of comparing the outcome of patients with acute traumatic coagulopathies receiving fibrinogen and fresh frozen plasma (FFP). METHODS: In this quasi-experimental randomized controlled study, patients with severe blunt trauma (ISS>16) and in need of packed cells transfusion were divided into 3 groups of receiving fibrinogen, receiving FFP, and control, and their final outcome was compared. RESULTS: 90 patients with the mean age of 33.16±16.32years were randomly allocated to one of the 3 study groups (82.2% male). The 3 groups were similar regarding baseline characteristics. Patients receiving fibrinogen needed significantly less packed cells (p=0.044) and intravenous fluid in the initial 24h of hospitalization (p=0.022). In addition, mortality rate (p=0.029), need for admission to intensive care unit (p=0.020) and duration of hospitalization (p=0.045) were also lower in the group receiving fibrinogen. The number of sepsis cases in patients receiving fibrinogen and control group was lower than those who received FFP (p=0.001). The number of multiple organ failure cases in patients receiving fibrinogen was about one fourth of the other 2 groups (p=0.106), and a fewer number of them needed mechanical ventilation (p=0.191). No case of venous thrombosis was detected in any of the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: Multiple trauma patients in need of transfusion who received fibrinogen along with packed cells had significantly better outcomes regarding mortality, sepsis, need for admission to the intensive care unit, need for receiving packed cells, need for receiving intravenous fluids in the initial 24h, and duration of hospitalization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29502332
[Au] Autor:Kumbargere Nagraj S; Prashanti E; Aggarwal H; Lingappa A; Muthu MS; Kiran Kumar Krishanappa S; Hassan H
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Medicine and Oral Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Melaka-Manipal Medical College (Manipal Academy of Higher Education), Jalan Batu Hampar, Bukit Baru, Melaka, Malaysia, 75150.
[Ti] Title:Interventions for treating post-extraction bleeding.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;3:CD011930, 2018 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes. This is an update of a review published in June 2016. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 24 January 2018), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 24 January 2018), Embase Ovid (1 May 2015 to 24 January 2018) and CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 24 January 2018). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We searched the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews. SELECTION CRITERIA: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted, we would have followed the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for the statistical analysis. MAIN RESULTS: We did not find any randomised controlled trial suitable for inclusion in this review. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We were unable to identify any reports of randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects of different interventions for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding. In view of the lack of reliable evidence on this topic, clinicians must use their clinical experience to determine the most appropriate means of treating this condition, depending on patient-related factors. There is a need for well designed and appropriately conducted clinical trials on this topic, which conform to the CONSORT statement (www.consort-statement.org/).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD011930.pub3

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[PMID]: 29305925
[Au] Autor:Shah M; Parikh K; Patel B; Agarwal M; Garg L; Agrawal S; Arora S; Patel N; Patel N; Frishman WH
[Ad] Address:Department of Cardiology, Lehigh Valley Hospital Network, Allentown, PA, United States. Electronic address: Mahek.shah@lvhn.org.
[Ti] Title:Use of therapeutic hypothermia among patients with coagulation disorders - A Nationwide analysis.
[So] Source:Resuscitation;124:35-42, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1570
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) on bleeding and in-hospital mortality among patients with coagulation disorders (CD). BACKGROUND: TH affects coagulation factors and platelets putting patients at risk for bleeding and worse outcomes. Effect of TH among patients with CD remains understudied. METHODS: Between 2009 and 2014, a total of 6469 cases of TH were identified using the National Inpatient Sample out of which 1036 (16.02%) had a CD. The incidence of bleeding events, blood product transfusion and in-hospital mortality was compared between patients with and without CD using one to one propensity score matching. RESULTS: Proportion of patients with CD increased during study duration from 13.0% to 17.4% from 2009 to 2014. Propensity matching was performed to adjust for baseline differences with 799 patients in both groups depending on presence or absence of CD. Patients with CD had a higher rate of bleeding events (13% vs. 8.5%; adjusted odds ratio 1.60; 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.23; P = 0.004), and blood product transfusion (25.0% vs. 14.1%; aOR 2.03; 95% CI 1.56-2.63; p < 0.001) compared to those without CD. There was no difference in rate of intracranial bleeding or hemorrhagic strokes between those with and without CD (3.3% vs. 3.2%; p = 0.88). There was no difference in mortality between patients with CD and those without (74.5% vs. 74.8%, aOR 0.98, 95% CI 0.78-1.23; P = 0.86). CONCLUSIONS: Use of TH with CD resulted in more bleeding events and blood product transfusion but there was no difference in hospital mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 28470719
[Au] Autor:Ballas SK
[Ad] Address:Cardeza Foundation for Hematologic Research, Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:From total blood exchange to erythrocytapheresis and back to treat complications of sickle cell disease.
[So] Source:Transfusion;57(9):2277-2280, 2017 09.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Erythrocytapheresis is an important procedure in the management of certain complications of sickle cell disease, including acute stroke, stroke prevention, acute chest syndrome, and multiorgan failure. Erythrocytapheresis in sickle cell disease simply entails the removal of the patient's red blood cells containing the abnormal sickle hemoglobin and replacing them with normal red blood cells carrying normal hemoglobin. In these procedures, the patient's plasma is not exchanged but is returned to the patient. Several studies have demonstrated that the plasma of patients with sickle cell disease contains several components that increase blood viscosity and initiate or promote vaso-occlusion. These factors include increased levels of globulins, especially immunoglobulin G, acute-phase reactants, fibrinogen, coagulation factors, inflammatory mediators, and heme in the steady state and increase further during painful crises. This may explain why, in certain complications of sickle cell disease, such as acute chest syndrome, hepatic crisis, and priapism, erythrocytapheresis by itself may not be effective despite repetitive cycles of red blood cell exchange. The use of therapeutic plasma exchange in addition to erythrocytapheresis in these situations seems to be useful in resolving them more efficiently. The role of therapeutic plasma exchange in the management of certain complications of sickle cell disease needs further evaluation. This commentary addresses the role of therapeutic plasma exchange in the management of complications of sickle cell disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anemia, Sickle Cell/therapy
Cytapheresis/methods
Exchange Transfusion, Whole Blood/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anemia, Sickle Cell/complications
Blood Viscosity
Disease Management
Erythrocytes
Humans
Plasma Exchange/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/trf.14154

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[PMID]: 29496170
[Au] Autor:Chinnadurai GS; Krishnan S; Perumal P
[Ad] Address:Centre for Advanced Studies in Botany, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, India.
[Ti] Title:Studies on detection and analysis of proteases in leaf extract of medicinally important plants.
[So] Source:Phytomedicine;40:176-188, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1618-095X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNO-PHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The whole plant or the extracts obtained from them have long been used as medicine to treat various human diseases and disorders. Notably, those plants endowed with protease activity have been traditionally used as the agents for treating tumors, digestion disorders, swelling, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and also for immune-modulation. AIM OF THE STUDY: Proteases occupy a pivotal position in enzyme based industries. Plant proteases have been increasingly exploited for pharmaceutical, food, leather and textile processing industries. Earlier investigations have focused on the occurrence of proteases in medicinally unimportant plants. Therefore it has been aimed to study the occurrence of proteolytic enzymes from medicinally important plants establish any correlation exists between protease activity and medicinal use of individual plants. METHODS: Crude extract were obtained from the leaves of 80 different medicinal plants. Tris-HCl buffer was used as the extraction buffer and the supernatants obtained were used for determination of total protein and protease activity using spectrophotometric methods. Qualitative screening for the presence of protease was carried out with agar diffusion method by incorporating the substrate. SDS-PAGE was used to analyse the isoforms of protease and for determination of relative molecular mass. RESULTS: Relatively higher protease activities were observed in the extracts of leaves of Pongamia pinnata (Fabaceae), Wrightia tinctoria (Apocyanaceae) Acalypha indica (Euphorbiaceae), Adhatoda vasica (Acanthaceae) and Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae). No correlation was found between the total protein content and protease activity in individual plant species. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated the presence of multiple forms of protease of higher molecular weight range in several plant species. We found a strong correlation between the protease activity and medicinal application of the plant CONCLUSION: The present study has unequivocally revealed that the leaves of medicinal plants could serve as excellent sources of proteases which could be exploited for various industrial, food and pharmaceutical applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 32144 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29492586
[Au] Autor:Lukasik ZM; Makowski M; Makowska JS
[Ad] Address:Department of Rheumatology, Medical University of Lodz, Ul. Pieniny 30, 92-115, Lódz, Poland.
[Ti] Title:From blood coagulation to innate and adaptive immunity: the role of platelets in the physiology and pathology of autoimmune disorders.
[So] Source:Rheumatol Int;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1437-160X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Thrombosis and cardiovascular complications are common manifestations of a variety of pathological conditions, including infections and chronic inflammatory diseases. Hence, there is great interest in determining the hitherto unforeseen immune role of the main blood coagulation executor-the platelet. Platelets store and release a plethora of immunoactive molecules, generate microparticles, and interact with cells classically belonging to the immune system. The observed effects of platelet involvement in immune processes, especially in autoimmune diseases, are conflicting-from inciting inflammation to mediating its resolution. An in-depth understanding of the role of platelets in inflammation and immunity could open new therapeutic pathways for patients with autoimmune disorders. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on the role of platelets in the patomechanisms of autoimmune disorders and suggests directions for future research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00296-018-4001-9


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