Database : MEDLINE
Search on : botulinum and toxins [Words]
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[PMID]: 29409922
[Au] Autor:De Groef A; Devoogdt N; Van Kampen M; Nevelsteen I; Smeets A; Neven P; Geraerts I; Dams L; Van der Gucht E; Debeer P
[Ad] Address:Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: an.degroef@kuleuven.be.
[Ti] Title:Effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin A for Persistent Upper Limb Pain After Breast Cancer Treatment: A Double-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:Arch Phys Med Rehabil;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1532-821X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of a single botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) infiltration in the pectoralis major muscle in addition to a standard physical therapy program for treatment of persistent upper limb pain in breast cancer survivors. DESIGN: Double-blinded (patient and assessor) randomized controlled trial. SETTING: A university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Breast cancer patients (N=50) with pain. INTERVENTION: The intervention group received a single BTX-A infiltration. The control group received a placebo (saline) infiltration. Within 1 week after the infiltration, all patients attended an individual physical therapy program (12 sessions) during the first 3 months and a home exercise program up to 6 months after infiltration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was change in pain intensity at the upper limb (visual analog scale, 0-100) after 3 months. Secondary outcomes were prevalence rate of pain, pressure hypersensitivity, pain quality, shoulder function, and quality of life. Measures were taken before the intervention and at 1, 3, and 6 months' follow-up. RESULTS: No significant difference in change in pain intensity after 3 months was found (mean difference in change, 3/100; 95% confidence interval [CI], -13 to 19). From baseline up to 6 months, a significantly different change in upper limb pain intensity was found between groups in favor of the intervention group (mean difference in change, 16/100; 95% CI, 1-31). CONCLUSIONS: A single BTX-A infiltration in combination with an individual physical therapy program significantly decreased pain intensity at the upper limb in breast cancer survivors up to 6 months. However, the effect size was not clinically relevant, and no other beneficial effects were found.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29320549
[Au] Autor:Heikkilä HM; Jokinen TS; Syrjä P; Junnila J; Hielm-Björkman A; Laitinen-Vapaavuori O
[Ad] Address:Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Assessing adverse effects of intra-articular botulinum toxin A in healthy Beagle dogs: A placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191043, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical, cytological, and histopathological adverse effects of intra-articularly injected botulinum toxin A in dogs and to study whether the toxin spreads from the joint after the injection. METHODS: A longitudinal, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted with six healthy laboratory Beagle dogs. Stifle joints were randomized to receive either 30 IU of onabotulinum toxin A or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. Adverse effects and spread of the toxin were examined by evaluating dynamic and static weight-bearing of the injected limbs, by assessing painless range of motion and pain on palpation of joints, and by performing synovial fluid analysis, neurological examination, and electrophysiological recordings at different examination time-points in a 12-week period after the injections. The dogs were then euthanized and autopsy and histopathological examination of joint structures and adjacent muscles and nerves were performed. RESULTS: Intra-articular botulinum toxin A did not cause local weakness or injection site pain. Instead, static weight-bearing and painless range of motion of stifle joints decreased in the placebo limbs. No clinically significant abnormalities associated with intra-articular botulinum toxin A were detected in the neurological examinations. Electrophysiological recordings showed low compound muscle action potentials in two dogs in the botulinum toxin A-injected limb. No significant changes were detected in the synovial fluid. Autopsy and histopathological examination of the joint and adjacent muscles and nerves did not reveal histopathological adverse effects of the toxin. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular botulinum toxin A does not produce significant clinical, cytological, or histopathological adverse effects in healthy dogs. Based on the electrophysiological recordings, the toxin may spread from the joint, but its clinical impact seems to be low.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Botulinum Toxins, Type A/adverse effects
Cartilage, Articular/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Botulinum Toxins, Type A/administration & dosage
Cartilage, Articular/pathology
Dogs
Female
Placebos
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Placebos); EC 3.4.24.69 (Botulinum Toxins, Type A)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191043

  3 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28459248
[Au] Autor:Germain L; Malcmacher L
[Ad] Address:Faculty, American Academy of Facial Esthetics; Private Practice, New Orleans, Louisiana.
[Ti] Title:Frontline Temporomandibular Joint/Orofacial Pain Therapy for Every Dental Practice.
[So] Source:Compend Contin Educ Dent;38(5):299-305; quiz 306, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2158-1797
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint and/or muscles of mastication. TMD may present along with many comorbid pain syndromes such as myofascial pain, headache, and neck and back stiffness with limited range of motion, as well as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. The diagnosis and management of TMD is complex and, many times, multidisciplinary. However, dentists can provide their patients with frontline temporomandibular/orofacial pain therapy with didactic and hands-on training that provides a better understanding and a conservative approach for treatment of TMDs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Facial Pain/therapy
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Botulinum Toxins, Type A/therapeutic use
Facial Pain/etiology
Humans
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/classification
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:EC 3.4.24.69 (Botulinum Toxins, Type A)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28468639
[Au] Autor:Sasajima H; Yagi S; Osada H; Zako M
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Botulinum toxin-induced acute anterior uveitis in a patient with Behçet's disease under infliximab treatment: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;11(1):124, 2017 May 04.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Injections of lipopolysaccharide in animal models generate acute anterior uveitis (also known as endotoxin-induced uveitis), but the effects of lipopolysaccharide injection are unknown in humans. We describe an unusual case in which acute anterior uveitis was dramatically activated subsequent to botulinum toxin injection in a patient with Behçet's disease but the acute anterior uveitis was satisfactorily attenuated by infliximab. CASE PRESENTATION: A 53-year-old Japanese man had normal ocular findings at his regularly scheduled appointment. He had been diagnosed as having incomplete-type Behçet's disease 11 years before. Three years after the diagnosis he was given systemic infusions of 5 mg/kg infliximab every 8 weeks and he had not experienced a uveitis attack for 8 years with no treatment other than infliximab. Two days after the eye examination, he received intracutaneous botulinum toxin injections to treat axillary hyperhidrosis on both sides. Three hours after the injections, he noted rapidly increasing floaters in his right eye. Four days after the injections, his right eye showed severe acute anterior uveitis with deteriorated aqueous flare and anterior vitreous opacity. He received his scheduled infliximab injection, and the right acute anterior uveitis immediately attenuated. CONCLUSIONS: Botulinum toxin may have clinical effects similar to those of lipopolysaccharide in endotoxin-induced uveitis models. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that botulinum toxin may trigger acute anterior uveitis, although the precise mechanism is still unclear.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Behcet Syndrome/drug therapy
Botulinum Toxins/adverse effects
Hyperhidrosis/drug therapy
Infliximab/administration & dosage
Neurotoxins/administration & dosage
Uveitis/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous
Male
Middle Aged
Tomography, Optical Coherence
Uveitis/diagnostic imaging
Uveitis/drug therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Neurotoxins); B72HH48FLU (Infliximab); EC 3.4.24.69 (Botulinum Toxins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1288-1

  5 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27771241
[Au] Autor:Merino PS; Vera RE; Mariñas LG; Gómez de Liaño PS; Escribano JV
[Ad] Address:Ocular Motility Section, Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: pilimerino@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Botulinum toxin for treatment of restrictive strabismus.
[So] Source:J Optom;10(3):189-193, 2017 Jul - Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1989-1342
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To study the types of acquired restrictive strabismus treated in a tertiary hospital and the outcome of treatment with botulinum toxin. METHODS: We performed a 10-year retrospective study of patients with restrictive strabismus aged ≥18 years who were treated with botulinum toxin. Treatment was considered successful if the final vertical deviation was ≤5 PD, horizontal deviation ≤10 PD, with no head turn or diplopia. RESULTS: We included 27 cases (mean age, 61.9 years). Horizontal strabismus was diagnosed in 11.1%, vertical in 51.9%, and mixed in 37%. Strabismus was secondary to cataract surgery in 6 cases, high myopia in 6, orbital fractures in 5, retinal surgery in 5, Graves ophthalmopathy in 4, and repair of conjunctival injury in 1 case. Diplopia was diagnosed in all patients, head turn in 33.3%. The initial deviation was 14 PD (range, 2-40), the mean number of injections per patient was 1.6 (range, 1-3), and the mean dose was 9.5 IU (range, 2.5-22.5). At the end of follow-up, diplopia was recorded in 59.3%, head turn in 18.5%, surgical treatment in 51.9%, and need for prism glasses in 14.8%. Outcome was successful in 37% of patients (4 high myopia, 3 orbital fractures, 2 post-surgical retinal detachment, and 1 post-cataract surgery). Mean follow-up was 3±1.8 years. CONCLUSION: Vertical deviation was observed in half of the sample. The most frequent deviation was secondary to cataract surgery and high myopia. Treatment with botulinum toxin was successful in one-third of the patients at the end of follow-up.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Botulinum Toxins/administration & dosage
Eye Movements/physiology
Forecasting
Strabismus/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Injections, Intramuscular
Male
Middle Aged
Neurotoxins/administration & dosage
Oculomotor Muscles
Retrospective Studies
Strabismus/physiopathology
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Neurotoxins); EC 3.4.24.69 (Botulinum Toxins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161025
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  6 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29503330
[Au] Autor:Tater P; Pandey S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Govind Ballabh Pant Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Botulinum toxin in movement disorders.
[So] Source:Neurol India;66(Supplement):S79-S89, 2018 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0028-3886
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Botulinum toxin has gained immense popularity since its introduction for therapeutic use. It is used in a variety of movement disorders like hemi-facial spasm, focal dystonias like blepharospasm, cervical dystonia, oromandibular dystonia, limb dystonias. It is also being used in patients with tremors, tics and for a variety of indications in Parkinson's disease as well. There are eight subtypes of toxins available, but type A and B are the ones used in movement disorder clinics. The toxin mainly acts by inhibiting the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and causing weakness. Type B toxin has more effect over the autonomic nervous system and hence is preferred for hyper-secretory disorders. The use of electromyography and ultrasound further improve the accuracy of the procedure. It is a relatively safe therapeutic option with its effect lasting for around three months. It has very few side effects. The key is to start with the lowest possible dose and then gradually increase the dose depending upon the patient's response. Selecting the right muscles for injection is of utmost importance and is guided by the knowledge of anatomy of the muscles.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/0028-3886.226441

  7 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498553
[Au] Autor:Wu Y; Lu Z; Xie Y; Zhang W; Chen X; Shi Y; Li Q; Halstead M; Rogers JD; Silberberg M
[Ad] Address:a Department of Dermatology, Peking University First Hospital , Beijing , China.
[Ti] Title:OnabotulinumtoxinA treatment of moderate to severe glabellar lines in Chinese subjects after laser therapy: A prospective, open-label, noncomparative study.
[So] Source:J Cosmet Laser Ther;:1-9, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1476-4180
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: This study evaluated safety and efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA for moderate to severe glabellar lines (GL) following laser therapy in Chinese subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Subjects (n = 173) were followed for 120 days following a single onabotulinumtoxinA (20 U) treatment for GL after recent laser therapy. Subjects completed validated patient-reported outcomes, including Facial Lines Outcome 11-item (FLO-11) Questionnaire and Facial Lines Satisfaction Questionnaire (FLSQ). Physicians and subjects assessed GL severity at maximum frown and at rest using the Facial Wrinkle Scale with Asian Photonumeric Guide (FWS-A). RESULTS: Mean total FLO-11 scores increased from 47.7 (baseline) to 75.9 (day 120) (p < 0.0001), with mean improvement of at least two grades for most items maintained to day 120. Most subjects were mostly or very satisfied, per the FLSQ. Percentages of subjects with at least one-grade improvement in FWS-A (responders) at maximum frown per subjects and physicians were 93.1% and 97.1%, respectively, at day 30, and 72.3% and 81.5% at day 120 (all, p < 0.0001). More than 70% were FWS-A responders at day 120. All adverse events were mild or moderate; none were related to onabotulinumtoxinA. CONCLUSIONS: A single onabotulinumtoxinA (20 U) treatment following laser therapy was safe and effective in correcting GL for up to 120 days.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14764172.2017.1406604

  8 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29494481
[Au] Autor:Garcia-Rodriguez C; Razai A; Geren IN; Lou J; Conrad F; Wen WH; Farr-Jones S; Smith TJ; Brown JL; Skerry JC; Smith LA; Marks JD
[Ad] Address:Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, Room 3C-38, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, 1001 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA. MariaConsuelo.Garcia@ucsf.edu.
[Ti] Title:A Three Monoclonal Antibody Combination Potently Neutralizes Multiple Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype E Subtypes.
[So] Source:Toxins (Basel);10(3), 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6651
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human botulism is most commonly caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, and E. For this work, we sought to develop a human monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based antitoxin capable of binding and neutralizing multiple subtypes of BoNT/E. Libraries of yeast-displayed single chain Fv (scFv) antibodies were created from the heavy and light chain variable region genes of humans immunized with pentavalent-toxoid- and BoNT/E-binding scFv isolated by Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). A total of 10 scFv were isolated that bound one or more BoNT/E subtypes with nanomolar-level equilibrium dissociation constants (K ). By diversifying the V-regions of the lead mAbs and selecting for cross-reactivity, we generated three scFv that bound all four BoNT/E subtypes tested at three non-overlapping epitopes. The scFvs were converted to IgG that had K values for the different BoNT/E subtypes ranging from 9.7 nM to 2.28 pM. An equimolar combination of the three mAbs was able to potently neutralize BoNT/E1, BoNT/E3, and BoNT/E4 in a mouse neutralization assay. The mAbs have potential utility as therapeutics and as diagnostics capable of recognizing multiple BoNT/E subtypes. A derivative of the three-antibody combination (NTM-1633) is in pre-clinical development with an investigational new drug (IND) application filing expected in 2018.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438679
[Au] Autor:Doxey AC; Mansfield MJ; Montecucco C
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: acdoxey@uwaterloo.ca.
[Ti] Title:Discovery of novel bacterial toxins by genomics and computational biology.
[So] Source:Toxicon;, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:1879-3150
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hundreds and hundreds of bacterial protein toxins are presently known. Traditionally, toxin identification begins with pathological studies of bacterial infectious disease. Following identification and cultivation of a bacterial pathogen, the protein toxin is purified from the culture medium and its pathogenic activity is studied using the methods of biochemistry and structural biology, cell biology, tissue and organ biology, and appropriate animal models, supplemented by bioimaging techniques. The ongoing and explosive development of high-throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatic approaches have set in motion a revolution in many fields of biology, including microbiology. One consequence is that genes encoding novel bacterial toxins can be identified by bioinformatic and computational methods based on previous knowledge accumulated from studies of the biology and pathology of thousands of known bacterial protein toxins. Starting from the paradigmatic cases of diphtheria toxin, tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins, this review discusses traditional experimental approaches as well as bioinformatics and genomics-driven approaches that facilitate the discovery of novel bacterial toxins. We discuss recent work on the identification of novel botulinum-like toxins from genera such as Weissella, Chryseobacterium, and Enteroccocus, and the implications of these computationally identified toxins in the field. Finally, we discuss the promise of metagenomics in the discovery of novel toxins and their ecological niches, and present data suggesting the existence of uncharacterized, botulinum-like toxin genes in insect gut metagenomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 14906 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29488655
[Au] Autor:Lane GI; Gor RA; Katorski J; Elliott SP
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
[Ti] Title:Clinical outcomes of non-surgical management of detrusor leak point pressures above 40 cm water in adults with congenital neurogenic bladder.
[So] Source:Neurourol Urodyn;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6777
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Neurogenic bladders (NGB) with detrusor leak point pressures >40 cm H O (dLPP > 40) have been associated with deterioration of renal function in children with myelomeningocele. For these children, careful pressure management preserves renal function. However, similar evidence is lacking in adult congenital urology (ACU) patients with NGB. We describe renal functional outcomes of non-surgical management of adults with dLPP > 40 or premicturition detrusor pressure (PMDP) >40 cm H O, consisting of close follow-up with urodynamic studies (UDS) and renal ultrasound (RUS), paired with adjustments to clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) frequency, anticholinergics, and addition of onabotulinumtoxinA toxin (BTX) injection. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the UDS of all patients at an ACU clinic from 2011 to 2016. Patients with dLPP/PMDP > 40 cm who elected for non-surgical management were included. We describe their management and renal functional outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 33/42 patients with dLPP/PMDP > 40 elected for non-surgical management. 28/33 (85%) were successfully managed without bladder augmentation or urinary diversion at follow-up of nearly 3 years. The median index dLPP/PMDP was 49 cm H O (IQR 44, 63) and final dLPP/PMDP was 28 (IQR 18, 43). There was a significant decrease in dLPP/PMDP and increase in bladder compliance between index and final UDS (P < 0.001). No patients advanced their CKD stage and 6/10 with baseline hydronephrosis had improvement or resolution of hydronephrosis with non-surgical management. CONCLUSIONS: A non-surgical protocol for ACU patients with NGB and dLPP/PMDP > 40, utilizing CIC, anticholinergics, and BTX is safe and effective when coupled with coordinated care and close follow-up.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/nau.23535


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