Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 24628093
[Au] Autor:Brunoni AR; Baeken C; Machado-Vieira R; Gattaz WF; Vanderhasselt MA
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Neuroscience (LIM27), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo , São Paulo , Brazil.
[Ti] Title:BDNF blood levels after electroconvulsive therapy in patients with mood disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:World J Biol Psychiatry;15(5):411-8, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1814-1412
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Abstract Objectives. To evaluate whether electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a very effective non-pharmacological treatment for mood disorders, induces neurotrophic effects, indexed by the measurement of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Methods. Systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials published in PubMed/Medline from the first date available to October 2013. We included studies measuring pre- and post-BDNF blood levels under ECT in patients with mood disorders in the acute depressive episode. Results. Eleven studies (n = 221 subjects) were eligible. These studies enrolled subjects with unipolar, bipolar and psychotic depression and varied regarding electrode placement (unipolar vs. bipolar) and previous use of pharmacotherapy. Nonetheless, BDNF significantly increased after ECT (Hedges' g pooled, random-effects model of 0.354; 95% CI = 0.162-0.546). The results were robust according to sensitivity analysis and Begg's funnel plot did not suggest publication bias. Meta-regression results did not show association of the outcome with any clinical and demographic variable, including depression improvement. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis indicates that, similar to pharmacological interventions, peripheral BDNF increases after ECT treatment. The lack of correlation between BDNF increasing and depression improvement suggests that ECT induces neurotrophic effects regardless of clinical response in depression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/15622975.2014.892633

  2 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23984711
[Au] Autor:Szwed K; Pawliszak W; Anisimowicz L; Bucinski A; Borkowska A
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Neuropsychology, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum , Bydgoszcz , Poland.
[Ti] Title:Short-term outcome of attention and executive functions from aorta no-touch and traditional off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery.
[So] Source:World J Biol Psychiatry;15(5):397-403, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1814-1412
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Abstract Objectives. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is an important neuropsychiatric complication of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). It is most likely caused by microembolic brain damage and affects domains of attention, memory, executive functions and dexterity. In order to achieve better neuroprotection, surgeons introduced some advantageous operating procedures. Noteworthy among them is a state-of-the-art off-pump CABG aorta no-touch technique ("no touch" OPCABG). The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of "no touch" OPCABG on patients' attention and executive functions. Methods. In this prospective, observational, single-surgeon trial, 74 patients scheduled for elective CABG were studied. Thirty-five patients underwent "no-touch" OPCABG and were compared to 39 patients who underwent "traditional" OPCABG. Subjects underwent neurological and neuropsychological evaluation at the time of admission (7 ± 2 days preoperatively) and discharge (7 days postoperatively). Results. Patients who underwent "traditional" OPCABG showed a significant decline in postoperative performance on 4 neuropsychological tests, while patients treated with "no touch" OPCABG showed a significant decline on 1 test. Twenty patients from "traditional" OPCABG group and ten patients from "no touch" OPCABG group were diagnosed with POCD. Conclusions. Use of "no touch" OPCABG was associated with better attention and executive functions 1 week after surgery compared with "traditional" OPCABG.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/15622975.2013.824611

  3 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 23800199
[Au] Autor:Demirakca T; Brusniak W; Tunc-Skarka N; Wolf I; Meier S; Matthäus F; Ende G; Schulze TG; Diener C
[Ad] Address:Department of Neuroimaging, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim/University of Heidelberg , Mannheim , Germany.
[Ti] Title:Does body shaping influence brain shape? Habitual physical activity is linked to brain morphology independent of age.
[So] Source:World J Biol Psychiatry;15(5):387-96, 2014 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1814-1412
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Abstract Objectives. Physical activity (PA) was found to influence human brain morphology. However, the impact of PA on brain morphology was mainly demonstrated in seniors. We investigated healthy individuals across a broad age range for the relation between habitual PA and brain morphology. Methods. Ninety-five participants (19-82 years) were assessed for self-reported habitual PA with the "Baecke habitual physical activity questionnaire", and T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were evaluated with whole brain voxel based morphometry for gray and white matter volumes and densities. Results. Regression analyses revealed a positive relation between the extent of physical activity and gray matter volume bilaterally in the anterior hippocampal and parahippocampal gyrus independent of age and gender. Age as well as leisure and locomotion activities were linked to enhanced white matter volumes in the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, suggesting a positive interaction especially in seniors. Conclusions. Habitual physical activity is associated with regional volumetric gray and white matter alterations. The positive relation of hippocampal volume and physical activity seems not to be restricted to seniors. Thus, habitual physical activity should be generally considered as an influencing factor in studies investigating medial temporal lobe volume and associated cognitive functions (memory), especially in psychiatric research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3109/15622975.2013.803600

  4 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24197672
[Au] Autor:Shiraishi M; Morita H; Muramatsu K; Sato A; Nitta J; Yamaguchi A; Adachi H
[Ad] Address:Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Saitama Red-cross Hospital, 8-3-33 Kamiochiai, Chyuo-ku, Saitama, Saitama, 338-8553, Japan, manabu@omiya.jichi.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Successful non-operative management of left atrioesophageal fistula following catheter ablation.
[So] Source:Surg Today;44(8):1565-8, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1436-2813
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Atrioesophageal fistula (AEF) is a potentially lethal complication of catheter radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation. A 49-year-old man with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who underwent catheter ablation around the pulmonary vein was admitted 31 days after the procedure, suffering seizures and fever. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed ischemia and multiple lesions of acute infarction in the right occipital lobe of the cerebrum. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest showed a small accumulation of air between the posterior left atrium and the esophagus, suggesting an AEF. Endoscopic snaring of the esophageal mucosa, repeated a few times, supported by nil by mouth and antibiotic therapy, resulted in improvement of his condition with no recurrence of symptoms. Subsequent chest CT scans confirmed disappearance of the leaked air and the patient was discharged home 45 days after admission with no neurological compromise.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00595-013-0744-9

  5 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024888
[Au] Autor:Nishiyama A; Toi H; Takai H; Hirai S; Yokosuka K; Matsushita N; Hirano K; Matsubara S; Nishimura H; Uno M
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan....
[Ti] Title:Chronic encapsulated intracerebral hematoma: Three case reports and a literature review.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:88, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Chronic encapsulated intracerebral hematoma (CEIH) is one type of intracerebral hematoma that sometimes grows progressively while forming a capsule and presenting with neurological deficits. Although many cases of CEIH have been reported, correct preoperative diagnosis is very difficult. Only around 20% of cases are diagnosed preoperatively. CASE DESCRIPTION: We encountered three cases of CEIH in which causes were unidentified and difficult to diagnose. All three cases were treated surgically. In the first case, a 59-year-old male was diagnosed preoperatively with metastatic brain tumor. In the second case, a 62-year-old female was diagnosed preoperatively with glioblastoma. The third case involved a 58-year-old female diagnosed preoperatively with CEIH. CONCLUSION: We should keep in mind that CEIH is a differential diagnosis for intracerebral space-occupying lesions. This report describes these three cases and discusses imaging findings and characteristics of CEIH.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134076

  6 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024886
[Au] Autor:Sahuquillo J; Biestro A
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Is intracranial pressure monitoring still required in the management of severe traumatic brain injury? Ethical and methodological considerations on conducting clinical research in poor and low-income countries.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:86, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.133993

  7 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024885
[Au] Autor:Katsuno M; Tanikawa R; Izumi N; Hashimoto M
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Abashiri Neurosurgical and Rehabilitation Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan....
[Ti] Title:The preparation of anastomosis site at the insular segment of middle cerebral artery.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:85, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: An anastomosis at the insular segment of the middle cerebral artery (M2) is often required in cerebral reconstruction with high- or low-flow bypass. It is necessary to create a shallow, wide, fixed, and bloodless anastomosis field to achieve a safe and quick anastomosis for low surgical morbidity. We describe a method to perform a safe and quick anastomosis. METHODS: From 2009 to 2013, the technique was used in 20 procedures to create an extracranial M2 high-flow bypass. The Sylvian fissure was dissected wide open to expose the M2. A silicon sheet was laid under M2 and the absorbable gelatin-compressed sponges were inserted between M2 and the insula cortex to lift up the M2 and fix it. The rolling surgical sheets were placed at each edge of the dissected Sylvian fissure, instead of brain spatulas. Finally, a small suction tube was placed at the Sylvian fissure and cerebrospinal fluid was continuously sucked. The postoperative patency of the bypass was evaluated by three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D-CTA) in the acute and chronic stages. RESULTS: In all cases, the operation field acquired for the anastomosis was adequate. The average time required for the procedure was 19 min 27 s. Good patency of all high-flow grafts was confirmed by postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA). CONCLUSION: In our series, there were no technical complications related to the anastomosis at M2 performed according to our method.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.133992

  8 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024883
[Au] Autor:Honeybul S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital and Royal Perth Hospital, Western Australia.
[Ti] Title:Neurological susceptibility to a skull defect.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:83, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There continues to be considerable interest in the use of decompressive craniectomy in the management of neurological emergencies. The procedure is technically straightforward; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that it is associated with significant complications. One complication that has received relatively little attention is the neurological dysfunction that can occur due to the absence of the bone flap and the subsequent distortion of the brain under the scalp as cerebral swelling subsides. The aim of this narrative review was to examine the literature available regarding the clinical features described, outline the proposed pathophysiology for these clinical manifestations and highlight the implications that this may have for rehabilitation of patients with a large skull defect. METHODS: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE database (1966 to June 2012). The following keywords were used: Hemicraniectomy, decompressive craniectomy, complications, syndrome of the trephined, syndrome of the sinking scalp flap, motor trephined syndrome. The bibliographies of retrieved reports were searched for additional references. RESULTS: Various terms have been used to describe the different neurological signs and symptoms with which patients with a skull defect can present. These include; syndrome of the trephined, posttraumatic syndrome, syndrome of the sinking scalp flap, and motor trephined syndrome. There is, however, considerable overlap between the conditions described and a patient's individual clinical presentation. CONCLUSION: It is becoming increasingly apparent that certain patients are particularly susceptible to the presence of a large skull defect. The term "Neurological Susceptibility to a Skull Defect" (NSSD) is therefore suggested as a blanket term to describe any neurological change attributable to the absence of cranial coverage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.133886

  9 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024897
[Au] Autor:Morley WA; Seneff S
[Ad] Address:Thionetic Nutrition, Richmond Hill, ON L4C 7T3, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Diminished brain resilience syndrome: A modern day neurological pathology of increased susceptibility to mild brain trauma, concussion, and downstream neurodegeneration.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:97, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The number of sports-related concussions has been steadily rising in recent years. Diminished brain resilience syndrome is a term coined by the lead author to describe a particular physiological state of nutrient functional deficiency and disrupted homeostatic mechanisms leading to increased susceptibility to previously considered innocuous concussion. We discuss how modern day environmental toxicant exposure, along with major changes in our food supply and lifestyle practices, profoundly reduce the bioavailability of neuro-critical nutrients such that the normal processes of homeostatic balance and resilience are no longer functional. Their diminished capacity triggers physiological and biochemical 'work around' processes that result in undesirable downstream consequences. Exposure to certain environmental chemicals, particularly glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup(®), may disrupt the body's innate switching mechanism, which normally turns off the immune response to brain injury once danger has been removed. Deficiencies in serotonin, due to disruption of the shikimate pathway, may lead to impaired melatonin supply, which reduces the resiliency of the brain through reduced antioxidant capacity and alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid, reducing critical protective buffering mechanisms in impact trauma. Depletion of certain rare minerals, overuse of sunscreen and/or overprotection from sun exposure, as well as overindulgence in heavily processed, nutrient deficient foods, further compromise the brain's resilience. Modifications to lifestyle practices, if widely implemented, could significantly reduce this trend of neurological damage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134731

  10 / 1225150 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25024892
[Au] Autor:Chugh AP; Gandhoke CS; Mohite AG; Khedkar BV
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery unit), B. J. Medical College and Sassoon General Hospitals, Pune, Maharashtra, India....
[Ti] Title:Primary angiosarcoma of the skull: A rare case report.
[So] Source:Surg Neurol Int;5:92, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5097
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Angiosarcomas are rare high grade endothelial tumors characterized by rapidly proliferating anaplastic cells derived from blood vessels and lining irregular blood filled spaces. Primary neoplasms of the skull are rare, representing 2.6% of primary neoplasms of bone. Primary malignant neoplasms of the skull are even rarer, accounting for only 0.8% of primary malignant neoplasms of bone. CASE DESCRIPTION: We report a 32-year-old female who presented with right parieto-occipital swelling, which gradually increased in size. Radiology was suggestive of a calvarial soft tissue lesion in the right parieto-occipital region with destruction of the adjacent parieto-occipital bone with intracranial extra-axial extension. Complete surgical excision of the calvarial lesion was done under general anesthesia. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan of brain (plain and with contrast) showed complete excision of the tumor mass. Histopathological diagnosis was consistent with 'an angiosarcoma of the skull'. On immunohistochemistry, the atypical endothelial cells were highlighted by CD34, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy to the tumor bed. CONCLUSION: Primary angiosarcoma of the skull is a rare tumor with less than 20 cases reported worldwide till date. The treatment should include complete surgical excision with a wide bony margin followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, which in our case has given a good locoregional control even at the end of 2 years. However, these patients should be followed up with repeated scans yearly to rule out locoregional as well as distant recurrence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1407
[Da] Date of entry for processing:140715
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/2152-7806.134365


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