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[PMID]: 25152295
[Au] Autor:Yang W; Wang F; Zhang Z; Ren X; Zhang Z; Li Y; Sun T
[Ad] Address:Ningxia Medical University, Incubation Base of National Key Laboratory for Cerebrocranial Diseases, Yinchuan 750004, China.
[Ti] Title:[Altered effective connectivity of insula in nicotine addiction].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi;94(21):1667-70, 2014 Jun 3.
[Is] ISSN:0376-2491
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To explore the changes of effective connectivity associated with insula in different nicotine addiction sessions so as to understand its role and function. METHODS: A total of 20 smokers received the scans of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in two sessions of different conditions: smoking abstinence followed by smoking satiety. Group ICA was initially adopted to obtain the independent component patterns. And paired t-test of ICA spatial patterns revealed such regions of interest as insula, parahippocampus, precuneus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, rostral anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area and ventromedial/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and effective connectivity from insula to other regions was examined subsequently with GCA. RESULTS: In smoking abstinence, insula showed increased effective connectivity with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, rostral anterior cingulate cortex, precuneus; while in smoking satiety, there was no significant changes for effective connectivity. Referring to graph theory analysis, the insula was a causal output source in smoking abstinence. CONCLUSION: Insula is a signal output node in smoking abstinence, with its interoceptive function monitoring the change of physiological state of body when in smoking abstinence, and then integrating each brain activity to produce subjective consciousness so as to facilitate addiction.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152293
[Au] Autor:Zhou Z; Zhao X; Chen M; Cai Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027, China....
[Ti] Title:[Micro magnetic sensitive weighted imaging for intracerebral hemorrhage].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi;94(21):1661-3, 2014 Jun 3.
[Is] ISSN:0376-2491
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To detect cerebral microbleeds by susceptibility weighted imaging and explore the relationship between intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral microbleeds and risk factors of cerebral vascular disease. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted for 70 patients from August 2012 to June 2013 undergoing susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). The average age was (68 ± 14) years. Their demographic and clinical profiles were recorded. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and SWI images were performed and images analyzed by an experienced radiologist. The occurrence of infarction, hemorrhage and number of microbleeds were recorded. Then regression analysis with SPSS 13.0 was used to define the relationship between the existence of infarction, hemorrhage and the number of microbleeds. RESULTS: There were 0-65 microbleeds in brains on SWI. There were infarction (n = 44) and chronic intracranial hemorrhage (n = 7). The binary Logistic regression analysis showed that intracranial hemorrhage was associated with hyperlipidemia (P = 0.01).Linear regression analysis showed that the number of microbleeds was related with intracranial hemorrhage (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Evaluation of microbleeds in brain by SWI may help to assess the possibility of intracranial hemorrhage so as to provides rationales for clinical therapeutics.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152287
[Au] Autor:Qian R; Wu M; Wei X; Ling S; Ji Y; Fu X; Wang Y; Niu C
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Anhui Provincial Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230001, China....
[Ti] Title:[Neuroimaging diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy of different surgical methods of gliomatosis cerebri].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi;94(21):1639-42, 2014 Jun 3.
[Is] ISSN:0376-2491
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To explore the neuroimaging diagnosis and therapeutic efficacy of different surgical methods of gliomatosis cerebri. METHODS: 26 cases of gliomatosis cerebri at our department between September 2008 and September 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative cranial computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and other multimodal imaging scans were performed. The procedures included stereotactic brain biopsy (n = 11) and large craniotomy lobotomy (n = 15). Whole brain radiotherapy and/or temozolomide therapy was performed postoperatively according to the malignancy of tumors. Follow-ups were conducted to analyze the survival differences between stereotactic brain biopsy and large craniotomy lobotomy groups. RESULTS: According to the different features of multimodal imaging, gliomatosis cerebri could be divided into two types: (1) type I(n = 19) showed a diffuse infiltrating lesion infringing multiple brain lobes or regions with central corpus callosum but without obvious enhancement; (2) type II (n = 7) appeared as sporadic or tuberous enhancement in addition to the features of type I. Pathological diagnosis: pilocytic astrocytoma (n = 2), diffuse astrocytoma (n = 13), oligodendroglial tumors (n = 3), oligoastrocytoma (n = 1), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 5) and glioblastoma (n = 2). The degree of malignancy was a prognostic factor for postoperative survival in patients with gliomatosis cerebri. The mean survival time (MST) of large craniotomy lobotomy group (23 ± 7) was significantly longer than that of stereotactic brain biopsy group (13 ± 3) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Gliomatosis cerebri is a primary brain glial tumor with diffuse infiltrative growth but retaining the general structure of central nervous system. Multimodal imaging studies plus pathological examination yield a definitive diagnosis. Comprehensive treatment of operation plus chemo- or radio-therapy can prolong postoperative MST.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152280
[Au] Autor:Cao G; Zhou X; Xu H; Pan K; Chen W; Li R
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou 325000, China....
[Ti] Title:[Optimizing scan protocol in whole-brain vessel one-stop examination with 640-multislice computed tomography].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi;94(21):1609-12, 2014 Jun 3.
[Is] ISSN:0376-2491
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of optimized scan protocol in whole-brain vessel one-stop examination with 640-multislice computed tomography (640-MSCT) scanner. METHODS: A total of 28 patients undergoing whole-brain vessel examination but showing no obvious cerebral disease with 640-MSCT scanner between September 2012 and May 2013 were collected and divided into two groups of A (n = 14) and B (n = 14) . The recommended scan protocol (protocol 1: collecting 19 volumes) was applied in A group while the optimized scan protocol (protocol 2: collecting 15 volumes) formulated by reducing scanning phases reasonably and changing collection intervals in B group. The dose length product (DLP) was recorded automatically and effective dose (E) measured. The CT perfusion (CTP) values and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images were analyzed for both groups. The regions of interest (ROI) of CTP images with area (20 ± 2) mm(2) were located in bilateral frontal white matter, parietal white matter, centrum semiovate, basal ganglia, occipital lobe and cerebellum. The image quality of CTA was evaluated by two experienced radiologists using double-blind method. The results were analyzed by statistics. RESULTS: Dose length product (DLP) in B group decreased 19.23% versus A group (3 419.40 vs 4 233.50 mGy·cm) .Every relative perfusion value of both sides from both groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05) .Every relative perfusion parameter from individual territory in both groups showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) . The quality of CTA images between groups A and B were not statistically significant (P > 0.05) . CONCLUSION: On the premise that the accuracy of perfusion parameters and the quality of CTA images, the optimized scan protocol in whole-brain vessel one-stop examination can obviously reduce radiation dose and it has important clinical significance.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25150667
[Au] Autor:Patel P; Bhatt T
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:Task matters: influence of different cognitive tasks on cognitive-motor interference during dual-task walking in chronic stroke survivors.
[So] Source:Top Stroke Rehabil;21(4):347-57, 2014 Jul-Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1074-9357
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The impact of unilateral brain damage, such as that caused by stroke, on the interaction between higher cognitive functions and walking remains uncertain. We compared cognitive-motor interference (CMI) during dual-task (DT) walking between chronic stroke survivors and young adults performing explicitly different cognitive tasks. METHODS: Ten community-dwelling chronic stroke survivors and 10 young adults performed 3 cognitive tasks - visuomotor reaction time (VMRT), serial subtraction (SS), and Stroop test (STR) - while sitting and walking. Gait velocity was recorded using an electronic walkway. Cognitive variables included reaction time and number of correct responses. Motor and cognitive costs were computed. RESULTS: DT walking led to significant declines in motor and cognitive performance. Significant main effect of task (P < .01) and group (P < .01) was observed for motor cost. The stroke group showed highest motor cost for SS task, whereas the young group showed highest motor cost for STR task (Group × Task interaction, P < .05). Although cognitive costs for both groups was highest for VMRT and lowest for STR tasks, cognitive cost for SS task was significantly greater for the stroke group compared with the young group (Group × Task interaction, P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: CMI pattern in chronic stroke survivors differs significantly with type of cognitive task. Gradual cognitive decline with chronicity of condition might have a role in altering the CMI pattern in this population. Future studies of DT interventions for stroke survivors might benefit from incorporating working memory tasks in their protocols.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1310/tsr2104-347

  6 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24291034
[Au] Autor:Yoshihara H; Yoneoka D
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 E. 17th St, New York, NY 10003, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1-Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan. Electronic address: hiroyoshihara55@yahoo.co.jp.
[Ti] Title:Trends in the surgical treatment for spinal metastasis and the in-hospital patient outcomes in the United States from 2000 to 2009.
[So] Source:Spine J;14(9):1844-9, 2014 Sep 1.
[Is] ISSN:1878-1632
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Surgical treatment for spinal metastasis is still controversial. However, with the improvements in treatment for primary tumors, the survival rate of patients with spinal metastasis is enhanced. At the same time, surgical technique for spinal metastasis has also improved. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine trends in the surgical treatment for spinal metastasis and in-hospital patient outcomes on a national level. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This was an epidemiologic study using national administrative data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. PATIENT SAMPLE: All discharges in the NIS with a diagnosis code of secondary malignant neoplasm of the spinal cord/brain, meninges, or bone who also underwent spinal surgery from 2000 to 2009 were included. OUTCOME MEASURES: Trends in the surgical treatment for spinal metastasis, in-hospital complications and mortality, and resource use were analyzed. METHODS: The NIS was used to identify patients who underwent surgical treatment for spinal metastasis from 2000 to 2009, using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification codes. Trends in the surgical treatment for spinal metastasis and in-hospital patient outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: From 2000 to 2009, there was an increasing trend in the population growth-adjusted rate of surgical treatment for spinal metastasis (1.15-1.77 per 100,000; p<.001). Average Elixhauser comorbidity score increased over time (2.6-3.8; p<.001), and the overall in-hospital complication rate increased over time (14.8%-27.7%; p<.001), whereas in-hospital mortality rate and length of hospital stay remained stable over time (5.2%-4.6%, p=.413; 10.6-10.8 days, p=.626). Inflation-adjusted mean hospital charges increased more than two-fold over time ($50,390-$110,173; p<.001). CONCLUSIONS: During the last decade, surgical treatment for spinal metastasis has increased in the United States. The overall in-hospital complication rate and hospital charges increased, whereas the in-hospital mortality rate and length of hospital stay remained stable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25023925
[Au] Autor:Chan KC; Shi L; So HK; Wang D; Liew AW; Rasalkar DD; Chu CW; Wing YK; Li AM
[Ad] Address:Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong. Electronic address: katechan@cuhk.edu.hk....
[Ti] Title:Neurocognitive dysfunction and grey matter density deficit in children with obstructive sleep apnoea.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;15(9):1055-61, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cerebral structural changes related to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have been reported in adult OSA patients; however, similar data and their associations with neurocognitive dysfunction are scarce in childhood OSA. OBJECTIVE: To compare neurocognitive function, regional grey matter density and cerebral volume in children with and without OSA. METHODS: Fifty OSA cases and 27 normal controls underwent a panel of neurocognitive tests. High resolution 3-dimensional magnetic resonance images of the brain were obtained from 23 OSA cases and 15 gender and age matched controls. Total cerebral volume and regional grey matter density were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry technique and compared between the two groups. Individuals with an obstructive apnoea hypopnoea index (OAHI) > 5 were defined as having moderate-to-severe OSA. RESULTS: Children with OSA showed significantly reduced attention and visual-fine motor coordination scores compared with controls. Grey matter volume deficit was observed in prefrontal and temporal regions of cases with moderate-to-severe OSA only. Significant negative correlations were found between the visual-fine motor coordination score and the ratio of grey matter volume over total brain volume. CONCLUSION: Children with OSA had impaired attention and visual-fine motor coordination. Regional grey matter reduction was evident in children with more severe OSA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24980066
[Au] Autor:Chinoy ED; Frey DJ; Kaslovsky DN; Meyer FG; Wright KP
[Ad] Address:Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309, USA....
[Ti] Title:Age-related changes in slow wave activity rise time and NREM sleep EEG with and without zolpidem in healthy young and older adults.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;15(9):1037-45, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Whether there are age-related changes in slow wave activity (SWA) rise time, a marker of homeostatic sleep drive, is unknown. Additionally, although sleep medication use is highest among older adults, the quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) profile of the most commonly prescribed sleep medication, zolpidem, in older adults is also unknown. We therefore quantified age-related and regional brain differences in sleep EEG with and without zolpidem. METHODS: Thirteen healthy young adults aged 21.9 ± 2.2 years and 12 healthy older adults aged 67.4 ± 4.2 years participated in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject study that compared placebo to 5 mg zolpidem. RESULTS: Older adults showed a smaller rise in SWA and zolpidem increased age-related differences in SWA rise time such that age differences were observed earlier after latency to persistent sleep. Age-related differences in EEG power differed by brain region. Older, but not young, adults showed zolpidem-dependent reductions in theta and alpha frequencies. Zolpidem decreased stage 1 in older adults and did not alter other age-related sleep architecture parameters. CONCLUSIONS: SWA findings provide additional support for reduced homeostatic sleep drive or reduced ability to respond to sleep drive with age. Consequences of reduced power in theta and alpha frequencies in older adults remain to be elucidated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25152908
[Au] Autor:Pu DM; Gao DQ; Yuan YB
[Ad] Address:School of Information Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China.
[Ti] Title:A primal analysis system of brain neurons data.
[So] Source:ScientificWorldJournal;2014:348526, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:1537-744X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:It is a very challenging work to classify the 86 billions of neurons in the human brain. The most important step is to get the features of these neurons. In this paper, we present a primal system to analyze and extract features from brain neurons. First, we make analysis on the original data of neurons in which one neuron contains six parameters: room type, X, Y, Z coordinate range, total number of leaf nodes, and fuzzy volume of neurons. Then, we extract three important geometry features including rooms type, number of leaf nodes, and fuzzy volume. As application, we employ the feature database to fit the basic procedure of neuron growth. The result shows that the proposed system is effective.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1155/2014/348526

  10 / 1232312 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24768662
[Au] Autor:Baburamani AA; Supramaniam VG; Hagberg H; Mallard C
[Ad] Address:Perinatal Centre, Department of Physiology and Neurosciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden....
[Ti] Title:Microglia toxicity in preterm brain injury.
[So] Source:Reprod Toxicol;48:106-12, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1873-1708
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Microglia are the resident phagocytic cells of the central nervous system. During brain development they are also imperative for apoptosis of excessive neurons, synaptic pruning, phagocytosis of debris and maintaining brain homeostasis. Brain damage results in a fast and dynamic microglia reaction, which can influence the extent and distribution of subsequent neuronal dysfunction. As a consequence, microglia responses can promote tissue protection and repair following brain injury, or become detrimental for the tissue integrity and functionality. In this review, we will describe microglia responses in the human developing brain in association with injury, with particular focus on the preterm infant. We also explore microglia responses and mechanisms of microglia toxicity in animal models of preterm white matter injury and in vitro primary microglia cell culture experiments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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