Database : MEDLINE
Search on : carbon and dioxide [Words]
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[PMID]: 29524689
[Au] Autor:Mafu LD; Neomagus HWJP; Everson RC; Okolo GN; Strydom CA; Bunt JR
[Ad] Address:Chemical Resource Beneficiation (CRB), School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001 Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:The carbon dioxide gasification characteristics of biomass char samples and their effect on coal gasification reactivity during co-gasification.
[So] Source:Bioresour Technol;258:70-78, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2976
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The carbon dioxide gasification characteristics of three biomass char samples and bituminous coal char were investigated in a thermogravimetric analyser in the temperature range of 850-950 °C. Char SB exhibited higher reactivities (R , R , R ) than chars SW and HW. Coal char gasification reactivities were observed to be lower than those of the three biomass chars. Correlations between the char reactivities and char characteristics were highlighted. The addition of 10% biomass had no significant impact on the coal char gasification reactivity. However, 20 and 30% biomass additions resulted in increased coal char gasification rate. During co-gasification, chars HW and SW caused increased coal char gasification reactivity at lower conversions, while char SB resulted in increased gasification rates throughout the entire conversion range. Experimental data from biomass char gasification and biomass-coal char co-gasification were well described by the MRPM, while coal char gasification was better described by the RPM.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29516014
[Au] Autor:Repsold L; Joubert AM
[Ad] Address:Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:Eryptosis: An Erythrocyte's Suicidal Type of Cell Death.
[So] Source:Biomed Res Int;2018:9405617, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2314-6141
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Erythrocytes play an important role in oxygen and carbon dioxide transport. Although erythrocytes possess no nucleus or mitochondria, they fulfil several metabolic activities namely, the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, as well as the hexose monophosphate shunt. Metabolic processes within the erythrocyte contribute to the morphology/shape of the cell and important constituents are being kept in an active, reduced form. Erythrocytes undergo a form of suicidal cell death called eryptosis. Eryptosis results from a wide variety of contributors including hyperosmolarity, oxidative stress, and exposure to xenobiotics. Eryptosis occurs before the erythrocyte has had a chance to be naturally removed from the circulation after its 120-day lifespan and is characterised by the presence of membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, and phosphatidylserine exposure that correspond to nucleated cell apoptotic characteristics. After eryptosis is triggered there is an increase in cytosolic calcium (Ca ) ion levels. This increase causes activation of Ca -sensitive potassium (K ) channels which leads to a decrease in intracellular potassium chloride (KCl) and shrinkage of the erythrocyte. Ceramide, produced by sphingomyelinase from the cell membrane's sphingomyelin, contributes to the occurrence of eryptosis. Eryptosis ensures healthy erythrocyte quantity in circulation whereas excessive eryptosis may set an environment for the clinical presence of pathophysiological conditions including anaemia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2018/9405617

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[PMID]: 29515116
[Au] Autor:Fu Y; Jiang YB; Dunphy D; Xiong H; Coker E; Chou S; Zhang H; Vanegas JM; Croissant JG; Cecchi JL; Rempe SB; Brinker CJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA.
[Ti] Title:Ultra-thin enzymatic liquid membrane for CO separation and capture.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):990, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The limited flux and selectivities of current carbon dioxide membranes and the high costs associated with conventional absorption-based CO sequestration call for alternative CO separation approaches. Here we describe an enzymatically active, ultra-thin, biomimetic membrane enabling CO capture and separation under ambient pressure and temperature conditions. The membrane comprises a ~18-nm-thick close-packed array of 8 nm diameter hydrophilic pores that stabilize water by capillary condensation and precisely accommodate the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA). CA catalyzes the rapid interconversion of CO and water into carbonic acid. By minimizing diffusional constraints, stabilizing and concentrating CA within the nanopore array to a concentration 10× greater than achievable in solution, our enzymatic liquid membrane separates CO at room temperature and atmospheric pressure at a rate of 2600 GPU with CO /N and CO /H selectivities as high as 788 and 1500, respectively, the highest combined flux and selectivity yet reported for ambient condition operation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-018-03285-x

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[PMID]: 29269688
[Au] Autor:El-Hawari SF; Sakata H; Oyama N; Tamura J; Higuchi C; Endo Y; Miyoshi K; Sano T; Suzuki K; Yamashita K
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Anesthesiology, and Radiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag 82524, Egypt.
[Ti] Title:Anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of single-bolus intravenous alfaxalone with or without intramuscular xylazine-premedication in calves.
[So] Source:J Vet Med Sci;80(2):361-367, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1347-7439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The anesthetic and cardiorespiratory effects of xylazine-alfaxalone combination were evaluated in calves. Six calves (age: 6-9 months old; weight: 114-310 kg) were anesthetized with intravenous alfaxalone 15 min after administration of intramuscular saline (0.5 ml/100 kg) or xylazine (0.1 mg/kg; 0.5 ml/100 kg of a 2% xylazine solution). Anesthesia induction was smooth and orotracheal intubation was achieved in all calves. The calves anesthetized with xylazine-alfaxalone required a smaller induction dose of alfaxalone (1.23 ± 0.17 mg/kg, P=0.010) and accepted endotracheal intubation for a significantly longer period (16.8 ± 7.2 min, P=0.022) than the calves anesthetized with alfaxalone alone (2.28 ± 0.65 mg/kg 7.3 ± 1.6 min). At 5 min after induction, tachycardia (heart rate: 166 ± 47 beats/min of heart rate), hypertension (mean arterial blood pressure: 147 ± 81 mmHg) and hypoxemia (partial pressure of arterial blood oxygen [PaO ]: 43 ± 10 mmHg) were observed in the calves anesthetized with alfaxalone alone, whereas hypoxemia (PaO : 47 ± 7 mmHg) and mild hypercapnia (partial pressure of arterial blood carbon dioxide: 54 ± 5 mmHg) were observed in the calves anesthetized with xylazine-alfaxalone. Premedication with xylazine provided a sparing effect on the induction dose of alfaxalone and a prolongation of anesthetic effect. Oxygen supplementation should be considered to prevent hypoxemia during anesthesia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1292/jvms.17-0512

  5 / 108955 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523922
[Au] Autor:Wittekind S; Mays W; Gerdes Y; Knecht S; Hambrook J; Border W; Jefferies JL
[Ad] Address:Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Heart Institute, 3333 Burnet Avenue, MLC 2003, Cincinnati, OH, 45229-3026, USA. Samuel.Wittekind@cchmc.org.
[Ti] Title:A Novel Mechanism for Improved Exercise Performance in Pediatric Fontan Patients After Cardiac Rehabilitation.
[So] Source:Pediatr Cardiol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-1971
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients with a Fontan circulation have impaired exercise capacity. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has shown promise in enhancing peak exercise parameters in this population, but an improvement in submaximal exercise has not been consistently demonstrated. We assessed the hypothesis that participation in CR will be associated with more efficient oxygen extraction and ventilation during submaximal exercise. In this prospective study, pediatric Fontans completed two 60 min CR sessions per week for 12 weeks. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and stress echocardiography were performed at baseline and last CR session, and then compared with a paired sample t test. Ten pediatric Fontans completed the study. Five had tricuspid atresia and five had hypoplastic left heart syndrome. No serious adverse events occurred during CR sessions. Peak indexed oxygen consumption increased by a mean of 3.7 mL/kg/min (95% CI 1.5-5.9; p = 0.004), and peak oxygen pulse increased by a mean of 0.9 mL/beat (95% CI 0.4-1.4; p = 0.004). The peak respiratory exchange ratio did not change significantly. The significant difference in oxygen pulse became evident during submaximal exercise without a corresponding difference in echocardiographic stroke volume. Indexed oxygen consumption at ventilatory anaerobic threshold increased by a mean of 3.0 mL/kg/min (95% CI - 0.07 to 6.0; p = 0.055). The slope for the volume of expired ventilation to volume of carbon dioxide production improved by a mean of 4.5 (95% CI - 8.4 to - 0.6; p = 0.03). We observed significant improvements in both submaximal and peak exercise performance in pediatric Fontans undergoing CR with no serious adverse events. These changes appeared to be mediated, at least in part, by more efficient oxygen extraction and ventilation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00246-018-1854-3

  6 / 108955 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523689
[Au] Autor:Esquirol L; Peat TS; Wilding M; Liu JW; French NG; Hartley CJ; Onagi H; Nebl T; Easton CJ; Newman J; Scott C
[Ad] Address:CSIRO, Australia.
[Ti] Title:An unexpected vestigial protein complex reveals the evolutionary origins of an s-triazine catabolic enzyme.
[So] Source:J Biol Chem;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1083-351X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cyanuric acid is a metabolic intermediate of s-triazines, such as atrazine (a common herbicide) and melamine (used in resins and plastics). Cyanuric acid is mineralized to ammonia and carbon dioxide by the soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP via three hydrolytic enzymes (AtzD, AtzE, and AtzF). Here, we report the purification and biochemical and structural characterization of AtzE. Contrary to previous reports, we found that AtzE is not a biuret amidohydrolase, but instead catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of 1-carboxybiuret. X-ray crystal structures of apo AtzE and AtzE bound with the suicide inhibitor phenyl phosphorodiamidate revealed that the AtzE enzyme complex consists of two independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. We also show that AtzE forms an α2ß2 heterotetramer with a hitherto unidentified 68-amino-acid-long protein (AtzG) encoded in the cyanuric acid mineralization operon from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Moreover, we observed that AtzG is essential for the production of soluble, active AtzE and that this obligate interaction is a vestige of their shared evolutionary origin. We propose that AtzEG was likely recruited into the cyanuric acid-mineralizing pathway from an ancestral glutamine transamidosome that required protein-protein interactions to enforce the exclusion of solvent from the transamidation reaction.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 108955 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523248
[Au] Autor:Gong YT; Yuan F; Dong Y; Li Z; Wang GL
[Ad] Address:International Joint Research Center for Photoresponsive Molecules and Materials, School of Chemical and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China.
[Ti] Title:Switched photoelectrochemistry of carbon dots for split-type immunoassay.
[So] Source:Anal Chim Acta;1014:19-26, 2018 Jul 19.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4324
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A novel and general strategy of split-type immunoassay is developed based on redox chemical reaction modulated photoelectrochemistry of carbon dots (CDs). Specifically, the photocurrent of the CDs sensitized titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO NPs) modified fluorine doped indium tin oxide (FTO) (that is the FTO/TiO /CDs) electrode was inhibited obviously by KMnO due to the oxidation of surface hydroxyl groups of CDs to electron accepting carbonyls. While the inhibited photocurrent of the KMnO treated FTO/TiO /CDs electrode can be restored by ascorbic acid (AA) because of the regeneration of electron donating hydroxyls to promote electron-hole separation. Take carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a model analyte and alkaline phosphate (ALP) as a catalytic label tracer to hydrolyze ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AAP) for producing AA, which greatly stimulated the photocurrent of the transducer of KMnO treated FTO/TiO /CDs photoelectrode for signal output. This redox chemical reaction modulated PEC strategy enabled the separation of the immunoreaction from the photoelectrode (that is, a split-type PEC detection), eliminating potential damage of biomolecules during the PEC detection processes and leading to enhanced throughput detection as compared to conventional PEC configurations. A low detection limit of 7.0 fg/mL was achieved for CEA. This convenient, split-type PEC immunoassay with high throughput may be easily extended to other bioaffinity assays for versatile targets.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 108955 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522871
[Au] Autor:Mascoli C; Faggioli GL; Gallitto E; Vento V; Pini R; Vacirca A; Indelicato G; Gargiulo M; Stella A
[Ad] Address:Vascular Surgery, DIMES, University of Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Standardization of a carbon dioxide automated system for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.
[So] Source:Ann Vasc Surg;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1615-5947
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR) is presently the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm; however, it requires the injection of contrast medium, which can hamper the renal function. Other non-toxic agents, such as carbon dioxide (CO ) have been sporadically tested in this setting with uncertain results. Aim of the study is to investigate the efficacy of a new standardized CO injection method in standard EVAR procedures. METHODS: Between August and October 2016, 31 consecutive patients (median age 76.1 (IQR:7.4) years) were submitted to standard EVAR. Proximal and distal endograft landing zone were identified by the injection of 100 mL of CO at 300 mmHg, through a 11 cm 10-Fr femoral sheath by a specifically manufactured automated injection device (Angiodroid SRL, San Lazzaro, Bologna, Italy). Before EVAR deployment a confirmative injection with conventional contrast medium was accomplished. The possibility of precisely visualize the proximal and distal landing zones by CO -DSA (digital subtraction angiography) was evaluated considering the contrast medium injection obtained in the same procedure as a gold standard. Similarly, the possible presence of endoleak was assessed at the end of the procedure with the two techniques. RESULTS: CO -DSA allowed to identify the juxta-renal landing zone of the endograft in 19/31 cases (61%) and the distal one in 31/31 (100%). In 12 (39%) cases CO injection failed to visualize at least the lowest renal artery. This occurred in large aneurysms with scarce thrombotic apposition and a luminal volume greater than 95.9 (IQR:25.2) mm . Completion CO -DSA detected type II endoleaks in 10 cases compared with 2 of conventional contrast media. CONCLUSION: The injection of non-toxic CO through an automated device allowed to perform EVAR procedure effectively, in the majority of cases. In some cases, a single injection of a minimum amount of conventional contrast medium can be used to overcome the lack of renal artery visualization by CO . Type II endoleaks are more frequently visualized with CO compared with standard contrast medium. Although the CO injection technique needs further amelioration particularly in the renal arteries detection, this technique appears promising and possibly substitutive of the standard contrast medium, with significant benefit for the renal function.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 108955 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522319
[Au] Autor:Sheng H; Oh M; Osowiecki WT; Kim W; Alivisatos AP; Frei H
[Ti] Title:Carbon Dioxide Dimer Radical Anion as Surface Intermediate of Photo-Induced CO2 Reduction at Aqueous Cu and CdSe Nanoparticle Catalysts by Rapid-Scan FT-IR Spectroscopy.
[So] Source:J Am Chem Soc;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1520-5126
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Monitoring of visible light sensitized reduction of CO2 at Cu nanoparticles in aqueous solution by rapid-scan ATR FT-IR spectroscopy on the time scale of seconds allowed structural identification of a one-electron intermediate and demonstrated its kinetic relevancy for the first time. Isotopic labelling (12C: 1632, 1358, 1346 cm-1; 13C: 1588, 1326, 1316 cm-1) revealed a species of carbon dioxide dimer radical anion structure, most likely bound to the catalyst surface through carbon. Intermediacy of Cu-C(=O)OCO2- surface species is in agreement with a recently proposed mechanism for eletrocatalytic CO2 reduction at Cu metal nanoparticles based on Tafel slope analysis. Spontaneous decrease of the intermediate after termination of the photosensitization pulse (Sn porphyrin excited at 405 nm) was accompanied by the growth of HCO3-. CO was produced as well, but sensitive detection required photolysis for tens of minutes. A direct kinetic link between a C2O4- surface intermediate and the CO product was also demonstrated for photocatalyzed CO2 reduction at aqueous CdSe nanoparticles, where first order growth of a Cd-C(=O)OCO2- species was accompanied by rise of CO (monitored by a fast Ni complex trap) and HCO3- showing a distinct induction period. The detection of the one-electron surface intermediate and confirmation of its catalytic relevancy was enabled by the delivery of electrons one-by-one by the photosensitization method. The observation of carbon dioxide dimer radical anion points to approaches for rate enhancements of heterogeneous CO2 reduction by creating catalytic environments that favor formation of this intermediate.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1021/jacs.8b00271

  10 / 108955 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505522
[Au] Autor:Zhang BJ; Tian HT; Li HO; Meng J
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesia, Jining No. 1 People's Hospital, Jining City, Shandong Province, China.
[Ti] Title:The effects of one-lung ventilation mode on lung function in elderly patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9500, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objective of the present study was to explore the effects of different one-lung ventilation (OLV) modes on lung function in elderly patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery. A total of 180 consecutive elderly patients (ASA Grades I-II, with OLV indications) undergoing elective surgery were recruited in the study. Patients were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 45). In Group A, patients received low tidal volume (VT < 8 mL/kg) + pressure controlled ventilation (PCV), low tidal volume (VT < 8 mL/kg) + volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in Group B, high tidal volume (VT ≥ 8 mL/kg) + PCV in Group C and high tidal volume (VT ≥ 8 mL/kg) + VCV in Group D. Two-lung ventilation involved routine tidal volume (8-10 mL/kg) at a frequency of 12 to 18 times/min, and VCV mode. Clinical efficacy among 4 groups was compared. The partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2) did not significantly differ among 4 groups (all P > .05), and the oxygenation index and SO2 in Group A were significantly higher than in the other groups (P < .05). The PetCO2, peak airway pressure (Ppeak), platform airway pressure (Pplat), and mean airway pressure (Pmean) in Group A were significantly lower than those in the other groups (all P < .05). However, airway resistance (Raw) among 4 groups did not significantly differ (all P > .05). The incidence of pulmonary infection, anastomotic fistula, ventilator-induced lung injury, lung dysfunction, difficulty weaning from mechanical ventilation, and multiple organ dysfunction in Groups A and B were lower than that in Groups C and D (all P < .05). The expression levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein in lavage fluid in Group A were significantly lower than those in the other groups (all P < .05). OLV with low tidal volume (VT < 8 mL/kg) + PCV (5 cmH2O PEEP) improved lung function and mitigated inflammatory responses in elderly patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Esophageal Neoplasms/surgery
One-Lung Ventilation/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry
C-Reactive Protein/analysis
Female
Humans
Interleukin-6/analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (IL6 protein, human); 0 (Interleukin-6); 0 (Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009500


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