Database : MEDLINE
Search on : carbon and monoxide and poisoning [Words]
References found : 5155 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29505539
[Au] Autor:Kim HH; Choi SC; Chae MK; Min YG
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Neuroprotective effect of ethanol in acute carbon monoxide intoxication: A retrospective study.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9569, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication, treatment of neurologic injury and prevention of neurological sequelae are primary concerns. Ethanol is the one of the frequent substances which is co-ingested in intentional CO poisoning. Neuroprotective effect of ethanol was highlighted and demonstrated in isolated brain injury recently. We assessed the neuroprotective effect of ethanol in acute CO intoxication using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).We retrospectively reviewed medical records for patients who visited an emergency medical center of a university-affiliated hospital during a period of 73 months, from March 2009 to April 2015. Enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups, patients with or without abnormal brain lesion in brain MRI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the factors associated with brain injury in MRI.A total of 109 patients with acute CO intoxication were evaluated of which 66 (60.55%) tested positive in brain MRI. MRI lesion-positive patients were more likely to have electrocardiogram change, elevation of serum troponin I and s100 protein level and lower serum ethanol level. Serum ethanol positivity was an independent factor for prevalence of brain injury in MRI in acute CO poisoning.This study revealed that ethanol which is co-ingested in acute CO intoxication may work the neuroprotective effect and could consequence more favorable neurological outcome in acute CO intoxication.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Injuries/etiology
Brain/drug effects
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/complications
Central Nervous System Depressants/pharmacology
Ethanol/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Brain/diagnostic imaging
Brain Injuries/blood
Brain Injuries/diagnostic imaging
Brain Injuries/prevention & control
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/blood
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/diagnostic imaging
Central Nervous System Depressants/blood
Ethanol/blood
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Central Nervous System Depressants); 3K9958V90M (Ethanol)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009569

  2 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521701
[Au] Autor:Eichner ER
[Ti] Title:Accidental Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Sports and Other Settings.
[So] Source:Curr Sports Med Rep;17(3):78-79, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1537-8918
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1249/JSR.0000000000000459

  3 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519303
[Au] Autor:Moon RE; Hampson NB
[Ad] Address:Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. Electronic address: richard.moon@duke.edu.
[Ti] Title:Efficacy of Hyperbaric Oxygen for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.
[So] Source:Chest;153(3):764, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1931-3543
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506505
[Au] Autor:Sobhakumari A; Poppenga RH; Pesavento JB; Uzal FA
[Ad] Address:California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, Davis branch, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, USA.
[Ti] Title:Pathology of carbon monoxide poisoning in two cats.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):67, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO), a common cause of poisoning in human beings has also been implicated in the death of animals. Though there are multiple studies on CO poisoning and relevant lethal blood COHb concentrations in humans, there are no reliable reports of diagnostic lethal carboxyhemoglobin percentage of saturation (COHb%) in cats. Additionally, due to shared housing environments, exposures to companion animals can be a surrogate for lethal exposures in human beings and provide valuable information in concurrent forensic investigations. CASE PRESENTATION: Two adult Singapura brown ticked cats were submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS) for necropsy and diagnostic work-up. These animals were found dead along with their two deceased owners. Similar lesions were observed in both cats. At necropsy, gross lesions consisted of multifocal, large, irregular, bright red spots on the skin of the abdomen and the inner surface of ear pinnae, bright red muscles and blood. The carcasses, and tissues fixed in formalin retained the bright red discoloration for up to two weeks. Microscopic lesions included diffuse pulmonary congestion and edema, and multifocal intense basophilia of cardiomyocytes mostly affecting whole fibers or occasionally a portion of the fiber. Based on the clinical history,gross and microscopic changes, cyanide or carbon monoxide poisoning was suspected. Blood samples analyzed for carbon monoxide showed 57 and 41% carboxyhemoglobin COHb%. Muscle samples were negative for cyanide. CONCLUSION: There are no established reference values for lethal COHb concentration in cats. The COHb % values detected in this case which fell within the lethal range reported for other species, along with the gross lesions and unique histological findings in the heart suggest a helpful criteria for diagnosis of CO intoxication associated death in cats. This case demonstrates that since pets share the same environment as human beings and often are a part of their activities, they can be useful adjuncts in potential forensic investigations to help solve human cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1385-4

  5 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513738
[Au] Autor:Bickler MP; Rhodes LJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, Hypoxia Research Laboratory, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Accuracy of detection of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin in human and bovine blood with an inexpensive, pocket-size infrared scanner.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0193891, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Detecting life-threatening common dyshemoglobins such as carboxyhemoglobin (COHb, resulting from carbon monoxide poisoning) or methemoglobin (MetHb, caused by exposure to nitrates) typically requires a laboratory CO-oximeter. Because of cost, these spectrophotometer-based instrument are often inaccessible in resource-poor settings. The aim of this study was to determine if an inexpensive pocket infrared spectrometer and smartphone (SCiO®Pocket Molecular Sensor, Consumer Physics Ltd., Israel) accurately detects COHb and MetHb in single drops of blood. COHb was created by adding carbon monoxide gas to syringes of heparinized blood human or cow blood. In separate syringes, MetHb was produced by addition of sodium nitrite solution. After incubation and mixing, fractional concentrations of COHb or MetHb were measured using a Radiometer ABL-90 Flex® CO-oximeter. Fifty microliters of the sample were then placed on a microscope slide, a cover slip applied and scanned with the SCiO spectrometer. The spectrograms were used to create simple linear models predicting [COHb] or [MetHb] based on spectrogram maxima, minima and isobestic wavelengths. Our model predicted clinically significant carbon monoxide poisoning (COHb ≥15%) with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 88% (regression r2 = 0.63, slope P<0.0001), with a mean bias of 0.11% and an RMS error of 21%. Methemoglobinemia severe enough to cause symptoms (>20% MetHb) was detected with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 71% (regression r2 = 0.92, slope P<0.001) mean bias 2.7% and RMS error 21%. Although not as precise as a laboratory CO-oximeter, an inexpensive pocket-sized infrared scanner/smartphone detects >15% COHb or >20% MetHb on a single drop of blood with enough accuracy to be useful as an initial clinical screening. The SCiO and similar relatively low cost spectrometers could be developed as inexpensive diagnostic tools for developing countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193891

  6 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29435715
[Au] Autor:Ng PCY; Long B; Koyfman A
[Ad] Address:Medical Toxicology, Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center, Denver Health and Hospital, 1391 Speer Blvd, Denver, CO, 80204, USA. patrickcng1@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Clinical chameleons: an emergency medicine focused review of carbon monoxide poisoning.
[So] Source:Intern Emerg Med;13(2):223-229, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1970-9366
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas that is found in the environment, in the home, and in the human body as a normal part of mammalian metabolism. Poisoning from CO, a common exposure, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not recognized and treated in a timely manner. This review evaluates the signs and symptoms of CO poisoning, conditions that present similar to CO poisoning, and an approach to the recognition and management for CO poisoning. CO poisoning accounts for thousands of emergency department visits annually. If not promptly recognized and treated, it leads to significant morbidity and mortality. CO poisoning poses a challenge to the emergency physician because it classically presents with non-specific symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Due to nonspecific presentations, it is easily mistaken for other, more benign diagnoses such as viral infection. The use of specific historical clues such as exposure to non-conventional heat sources or suicide attempts in garages, as well as the use of targeted diagnostic testing with CO-oximetry, can confirm the diagnosis of CO poisoning. Once diagnosed, treatment options range from observation to the use of hyperbaric oxygen. CO poisoning is an elusive diagnosis. This review evaluates the signs and symptoms CO poisoning, common chameleons or mimics, and an approach to management of CO poisoning.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11739-018-1798-x

  7 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29205964
[Au] Autor:Chen Q; Bai J; Li CR; Zhang WF
[Ad] Address:Forensic Medical Examination Center of Beijing Public Security Bureau, Beijing 100192, China.
[Ti] Title:[Changes of HbCO in the Blood of Rats with Different CO Concentration and Inhalation Time].
[So] Source:Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi;32(6):410-412, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1004-5619
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To explore the change rules of behavioral characteristics, survival time and saturation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in different CO concentration to provide experimental basis for the cases of CO poisoning death in forensic practice. METHODS: Total 160 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups. CO with the concentration of 1 250 mg/m³, 3 750 mg/m³, 6 250 mg/m³ were continuously and respectively replenished in a self-made toxicant exposure equipment until rats died from poisoning. In different CO concentration, the behavioral characteristics and survival time of poisoning rats were observed and recorded. The saturation of HbCO in heart blood was detected by spectrophotometric method. Organs such as brain, heart, lung and liver, and heart blood were obtained via autopsy and histopathological observation was performed. RESULTS: The behavioral characteristics of CO poisoning rats were limp and slow response. There were a gradual decrease of survival time and an increase of HbCO saturation in rats with the increase of CO concentration. Three rats in CO concentration of 1 250 mg/m³ group showed lower saturations of HbCO than the lethal dose and this situation hasn't been found in other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The animal model of CO poisoning established under different CO concentration has the advantages such as simplicity and good repeatability, which lays a foundation to the further study for CO and other inhaled toxic gas in the research of forensic sciences.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/blood
Carboxyhemoglobin/analysis
Disease Models, Animal
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:9061-29-4 (Carboxyhemoglobin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1004-5619.2016.06.003

  8 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29473394
[Au] Autor:Dufayet L; Médernach C; Bassi C; Garnier R; Langrand J
[Ti] Title:Épidémie d'intoxications oxycarbonées lors de la crue de la Seine au printemps 2016. [Outbreak of carbon monoxide poisoning in the Ile-de-France region during the spring 2016 Seine flooding].
[So] Source:Sante Publique;29(6):803-809, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0995-3914
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Heavy rainfall in May 2016 caused large-scale flooding of the Seine and its tributaries. Analysis of this unusual event showed that it could recur on an even larger scale. The sanitary consequences were less frequently assessed in this analysis, particularly the risk of accidental collective carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning caused by the use of combustion engine drainage pumps. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all cases of acute accidental carbon monoxide exposure observed in the Ile-de-France region, related to the use of drainage pumps in spring and summer 2016 and notified to the Ile-de-France CO poisoning surveillance network. RESULTS: Five events were identified, including 45 people exposed to carbon monoxide. Thirty-four of these people were poisoned, 5 were not poisoned and insufficient data were available for 6 people. Three people showed signs of severity and 2 were treated by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The other poisoned individuals were managed in hospital and treated by oxygen therapy. All were cured. DISCUSSION: Collective CO poisonings are common sanitary events during flooding and can be potentially severe. They can occur during the event or over the following days. Preventive measures may help to reduce the risk of CO poisoning, such as increased awareness among professionals, better information of individuals who rent these types of devices or even the use of CO detectors during their use.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3917/spub.176.0803

  9 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29355713
[Au] Autor:Zhang P; Dai Y; Xiong J; Zhu S; Zhao M; Ding S; Li J
[Ad] Address:Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.
[Ti] Title:iTRAQ-based differential proteomic analysis of the brains in a rat model of delayedcarbon monoxide encephalopathy.
[So] Source:Brain Res Bull;137:329-337, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2747
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning (DEACMP) is a difficult-to-manage neurological complication that can severely affect the life quality of patients. Although the central nervous system (CNS) injuries have been reported, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, we established a rat model of DEACMP, applying isobaric tags for a relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based proteomics approach to identify differentially expressed proteins in cerebral tissue. A total of 170 proteins in the CO exposure groups were identified as differentially changed. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that these proteins are mainly involved in the biological processes, such as energy metabolism and many neurodegenerative diseases. Three proteins, Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (MDHM), and isocitrate dehydrogenase [NAD] subunit alpha (IDH3A), were identified as playing important roles in CNS injuries in DEACMP, and were successfully confirmed by immunohistochemistry analysis. Our study not only offers us new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of CNS injuries in DEACMP, but also may provide clinicians with important references in early prevention and treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 5155 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29489307
[Au] Autor:Otterness K; Ahn C; Nusbaum J; Gupta N
[Ad] Address:Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY.
[Ti] Title:Emergency department management of smoke inhalation injury in adults [digest].
[So] Source:Emerg Med Pract;20(3 Suppl Points & Pearls):1-2, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1559-3908
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Smoke inhalation injury portends increased morbidity and mortality in fire-exposed patients. Upper airway thermal burns, inflammation from lower airway irritants, and systemic effects of carbon monoxide and cyanide can contribute to injury. A standardized diagnostic protocol for inhalation injury is lacking, and management remains mostly supportive. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for concomitant traumatic injuries. Diagnosis is mostly clinical, aided by bronchoscopy and other supplementary tests. Treatment includes airway and respiratory support, lung protective ventilation, 100% oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy for carbon monoxide poisoning, and hydroxocobalamin for cyanide toxicity. Due to its progressive nature, many patients with smoke inhalation injury warrant close monitoring for development of airway compromise. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[St] Status:In-Process


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