Database : MEDLINE
Search on : carboxyhemoglobin [Words]
References found : 3756 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 376 go to page                         

  1 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29506505
[Au] Autor:Sobhakumari A; Poppenga RH; Pesavento JB; Uzal FA
[Ad] Address:California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, Davis branch, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, USA.
[Ti] Title:Pathology of carbon monoxide poisoning in two cats.
[So] Source:BMC Vet Res;14(1):67, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1746-6148
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide (CO), a common cause of poisoning in human beings has also been implicated in the death of animals. Though there are multiple studies on CO poisoning and relevant lethal blood COHb concentrations in humans, there are no reliable reports of diagnostic lethal carboxyhemoglobin percentage of saturation (COHb%) in cats. Additionally, due to shared housing environments, exposures to companion animals can be a surrogate for lethal exposures in human beings and provide valuable information in concurrent forensic investigations. CASE PRESENTATION: Two adult Singapura brown ticked cats were submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS) for necropsy and diagnostic work-up. These animals were found dead along with their two deceased owners. Similar lesions were observed in both cats. At necropsy, gross lesions consisted of multifocal, large, irregular, bright red spots on the skin of the abdomen and the inner surface of ear pinnae, bright red muscles and blood. The carcasses, and tissues fixed in formalin retained the bright red discoloration for up to two weeks. Microscopic lesions included diffuse pulmonary congestion and edema, and multifocal intense basophilia of cardiomyocytes mostly affecting whole fibers or occasionally a portion of the fiber. Based on the clinical history,gross and microscopic changes, cyanide or carbon monoxide poisoning was suspected. Blood samples analyzed for carbon monoxide showed 57 and 41% carboxyhemoglobin COHb%. Muscle samples were negative for cyanide. CONCLUSION: There are no established reference values for lethal COHb concentration in cats. The COHb % values detected in this case which fell within the lethal range reported for other species, along with the gross lesions and unique histological findings in the heart suggest a helpful criteria for diagnosis of CO intoxication associated death in cats. This case demonstrates that since pets share the same environment as human beings and often are a part of their activities, they can be useful adjuncts in potential forensic investigations to help solve human cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12917-018-1385-4

  2 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29513738
[Au] Autor:Bickler MP; Rhodes LJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, Hypoxia Research Laboratory, University of California, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Accuracy of detection of carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin in human and bovine blood with an inexpensive, pocket-size infrared scanner.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0193891, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Detecting life-threatening common dyshemoglobins such as carboxyhemoglobin (COHb, resulting from carbon monoxide poisoning) or methemoglobin (MetHb, caused by exposure to nitrates) typically requires a laboratory CO-oximeter. Because of cost, these spectrophotometer-based instrument are often inaccessible in resource-poor settings. The aim of this study was to determine if an inexpensive pocket infrared spectrometer and smartphone (SCiO®Pocket Molecular Sensor, Consumer Physics Ltd., Israel) accurately detects COHb and MetHb in single drops of blood. COHb was created by adding carbon monoxide gas to syringes of heparinized blood human or cow blood. In separate syringes, MetHb was produced by addition of sodium nitrite solution. After incubation and mixing, fractional concentrations of COHb or MetHb were measured using a Radiometer ABL-90 Flex® CO-oximeter. Fifty microliters of the sample were then placed on a microscope slide, a cover slip applied and scanned with the SCiO spectrometer. The spectrograms were used to create simple linear models predicting [COHb] or [MetHb] based on spectrogram maxima, minima and isobestic wavelengths. Our model predicted clinically significant carbon monoxide poisoning (COHb ≥15%) with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 88% (regression r2 = 0.63, slope P<0.0001), with a mean bias of 0.11% and an RMS error of 21%. Methemoglobinemia severe enough to cause symptoms (>20% MetHb) was detected with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 71% (regression r2 = 0.92, slope P<0.001) mean bias 2.7% and RMS error 21%. Although not as precise as a laboratory CO-oximeter, an inexpensive pocket-sized infrared scanner/smartphone detects >15% COHb or >20% MetHb on a single drop of blood with enough accuracy to be useful as an initial clinical screening. The SCiO and similar relatively low cost spectrometers could be developed as inexpensive diagnostic tools for developing countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193891

  3 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29205964
[Au] Autor:Chen Q; Bai J; Li CR; Zhang WF
[Ad] Address:Forensic Medical Examination Center of Beijing Public Security Bureau, Beijing 100192, China.
[Ti] Title:[Changes of HbCO in the Blood of Rats with Different CO Concentration and Inhalation Time].
[So] Source:Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi;32(6):410-412, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1004-5619
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To explore the change rules of behavioral characteristics, survival time and saturation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in different CO concentration to provide experimental basis for the cases of CO poisoning death in forensic practice. METHODS: Total 160 SD rats were randomly divided into four groups. CO with the concentration of 1 250 mg/m³, 3 750 mg/m³, 6 250 mg/m³ were continuously and respectively replenished in a self-made toxicant exposure equipment until rats died from poisoning. In different CO concentration, the behavioral characteristics and survival time of poisoning rats were observed and recorded. The saturation of HbCO in heart blood was detected by spectrophotometric method. Organs such as brain, heart, lung and liver, and heart blood were obtained via autopsy and histopathological observation was performed. RESULTS: The behavioral characteristics of CO poisoning rats were limp and slow response. There were a gradual decrease of survival time and an increase of HbCO saturation in rats with the increase of CO concentration. Three rats in CO concentration of 1 250 mg/m³ group showed lower saturations of HbCO than the lethal dose and this situation hasn't been found in other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The animal model of CO poisoning established under different CO concentration has the advantages such as simplicity and good repeatability, which lays a foundation to the further study for CO and other inhaled toxic gas in the research of forensic sciences.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning/blood
Carboxyhemoglobin/analysis
Disease Models, Animal
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:9061-29-4 (Carboxyhemoglobin)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1004-5619.2016.06.003

  4 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29354888
[Au] Autor:Na JY; Park JH; Choi BH; Kim HS; Park JT
[Ad] Address:Biomedical Research Institute, Chonnam National University Hospital, 42, Jebong-ro, Dong-gu, Gwangju, 61469, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Point-of-care hemoglobin testing for postmortem diagnosis of anemia.
[So] Source:Forensic Sci Med Pathol;14(1):57-61, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1556-2891
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An autopsy involves examination of a body using invasive methods such as dissection, and includes various tests using samples procured during dissection. During medicolegal autopsies, the blood carboxyhemoglobin concentration is commonly measured using the AVOXimeter® 4000 as a point-of-care test. When evaluating the body following hypovolemic shock, characteristics such as reduced livor mortis or an anemic appearance of the viscera can be identified, but these observations arequite subjective. Thus, a more objective test is required for the postmortem diagnosis of anemia. In the present study, the AVOXimeter® 4000 was used to investigate the utility of point-of-care hemoglobin testing. Hemoglobin tests were performed in 93 autopsy cases. The AVOXimeter® 4000 and the BC-2800 Auto Hematology Analyzer were used to test identical samples in 29 of these cases. The results of hemoglobin tests performed with these two devices were statistically similar (r = 0.969). The results of hemoglobin tests using postmortem blood were compared with antemortem test results from medical records from 31 cases, and these results were similar. In 13 of 17 cases of death from internal hemorrhage, hemoglobin levels were lower in the cardiac blood than in blood from the affected body cavity, likely due to compensatory changes induced by antemortem hemorrhage. It is concluded that blood hemoglobin testing may be useful as a point-of-care test for diagnosing postmortem anemia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12024-018-9945-2

  5 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29461288
[Au] Autor:Culnan DM; Craft-Coffman B; Bitz GH; Capek KD; Tu Y; Lineaweaver WC; Kuhlmann-Capek MJ
[Ti] Title:Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide Poisoning in the Burned Pregnant Patient: An Indication for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.
[So] Source:Ann Plast Surg;80(3 Suppl 2):S106-S112, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3708
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carbon monoxide (CO) is a small molecule poison released as a product of incomplete combustion. Carbon monoxide binds hemoglobin, reducing oxygen delivery. This effect is exacerbated in the burned pregnant patient by fetal hemoglobin that binds CO 2.5- to 3-fold stronger than maternal hemoglobin. With no signature clinical symptom, diagnosis depends on patient injury history, elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels, and alterations in mental status. The standard of care for treatment of CO intoxication is 100% normobaric oxygen, which decreases the half-life of CO in the bloodstream from 5 hours to 1 hour. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is a useful adjunct to rapidly reduce the half-life of CO to 20 minutes and the incidence of delayed neurologic sequelae. Because of the slow disassociation of CO from hemoglobin in the fetus, there is a far stronger indication for HBO2 in the burned pregnant patient than in other burn patient populations.Cyanide intoxication is often a comorbid disease with CO in inhalation injury from an enclosed fire, but may be the predominant toxin. It acts synergistically with CO to effectively lower the lethal doses of both cyanide and CO. Diagnosis is best made in the presence of high lactate levels, carboxyhemoglobin concentrations greater than 10%, injury history of smoke inhalation from an enclosed fire, and alterations in consciousness. While treatment with hydroxocobalamin is the standard of care and has the effect of reducing concomitant CO toxicity, data indicate cyanide may also be displaced by HBO2.Carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning presents potential complications impacting care. This review addresses the mechanism of action, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of CO and cyanide poisonings in the burned pregnant patient and the use of HBO2 therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/SAP.0000000000001351

  6 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29380623
[Au] Autor:Lucarelli K; Wyne K; Svenson JE
[Ad] Address:a Department of Emergency Medicine , University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health , Madison , WI , USA.
[Ti] Title:Improved cookstoves and their effect on carbon monoxide levels in San Lucas Tolimán, Guatemala.
[So] Source:Int J Environ Health Res;28(1):64-70, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1369-1619
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Installation of ventilated cookstoves has been shown to improve 24-h carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate exposure in the Guatemalan highlands. However, a survey of villagers around San Lucas Tolimán found much higher than expected CO levels. Our purpose is to evaluate the effects of improved cookstoves on CO levels in these villagers. METHODS: This is cross sectional observational study in six rural communities. Blood carboxyhemoglobin (SpCO) was measured at three different times during the day. Stove type and location, as well as any respiratory, eye, or general symptoms reported were recorded. RESULTS: 122 patients were included. CO levels were much higher than would be expected in a non-smoking population, with an average level of 4.6 ± 2.3 percent. There was no significant correlation in CO level and stove type or in CO level and time of day. Reported frequency of respiratory and eye symptoms (dyspnea, p = 0.03; cough, p = 0.01; burning eyes, p = 0.001; and excessive tearing, p = 0.001) did vary significantly between improved and unimproved stove groups. CONCLUSION: This study found high average SpCO levels in all villagers. This suggests that some contributor other than cookstoves may be an additional driver of individual CO exposure in this area.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/09603123.2018.1429575

  7 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29468519
[Au] Autor:Delvau N; Penaloza A; Liistro G; Thys F; Delattre IK; Hantson P; Gianello P; Roy PM
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Cliniques universitaires Saint-Luc, Université Catholique de Louvain, 1200, Brussels, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Effect of Pressure Support Ventilation on Carboxyhemoglobin Toxicokinetic after Acute Carbon Monoxide Intoxication: a Swine Model.
[So] Source:J Med Toxicol;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1937-6995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: In an experimental study on carbon monoxide (CO) exposure in swine, we aimed to compare the influence of oxygen therapy using a non-rebreathing mask (NRM) to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and two pressure support ventilation (PSV) devices on the decrease of the terminal elimination half-life of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb t ). This was the primary outcome. METHODS: Eight spontaneously breathing pigs were sedated by propofol and exposed to 940 ppm CO several times (n = 25) to obtain COHb levels of 30%. CPAPb (high flow open system, CPAP Boussignac® [7.5 cmH O]), PSV-Vy (open system, Vylife Boussignac®), and PSV-Leg (closed system, Legendair® [inspiratory/expiratory airway pressure 12/4 cmH O]) devices were used in a randomized order and compared to NRM (O at 15 l min ) and atmospheric air (AA). The primary outcome was COHb t . Multiple comparisons were performed using Dunn's tests. RESULTS: Median FiO and minute ventilation were significantly higher in the PSV-Leg group than the NRM group (p < 0.05). Median COHb t was 251, 85, 82, 93, and 58 min for AA, NRM, CPAPb, PSV-Vy, and PSV-Leg, respectively. All the interventions were superior to AA in terms of CO elimination (p < 0.001), but there was no statistically significant difference between CPAP or PSV and NRM. There was only a trend between PSV-Leg and NRM (p = 0.18). The median AUCs for ln (COHb) × time (h) were 170, 79, 83, 100, and 64 for AA, NRM, CPAPb, PSV-Vy, and PSV-Leg respectively, with a statistically significant difference only between AA and PSV-Leg (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, in our study on CO intoxication in swine, the use of the closed PSV-Leg system led to the shortest COHb t . These results suggest that PSV-Leg can be more efficient than NRM in eliminating CO and support the design of a clinical study to assess this hypothesis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13181-018-0654-8

  8 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29176268
[Au] Autor:Lim H; Lee SK; Kim G
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Hanyang University Medical Center.
[Ti] Title:Hemodynamic Implications of Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Nitrogen Oxide (NO) during Living Donor Liver Transplantation.
[So] Source:Tohoku J Exp Med;243(3):179-186, 2017 11.
[Is] ISSN:1349-3329
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxide (NO) affect vasodilation and cause hemodynamic change. Hemodynamic instability due to liver transplantation may result in poor prognosis of graft. This study investigated the hemodynamic implications of CO and NO levels measured using carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) during living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). The hemodynamic instability with a pressor dose (norepinephrine equivalent) was estimated 1 hour after graft reperfusion. COHb and MetHb were used as indexes of CO and NO, and were measured using an arterial blood gas analyzer. One hundred and ten recipients who underwent LDLT from May 2011 to July 2013 were selected. Recipients were divided into high (≥ 1.9%) and low (< 1.9%) COHb groups with COHb concentrations at 5 minutes after reperfusion. Recipients were also divided into high (≥ 0.4%) and low (< 0.4%) MetHb groups with MetHb concentrations at 30 minutes after reperfusion. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation or number (percentage). Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were different for the two COHb groups (low: 13.4 ± 9.0 vs. high: 19.7 ± 10.6, p < 0.001), and pressor doses adjusted by MELD scores were also different between the two COHb groups (low: 0.09 ± 0.01 µg/kg/min vs. high: 0.14 ± 0.01 µg/kg/min, p = 0.029). By contrast, pressor doses and MELD scores were not different between the two MetHb groups. In conclusion, CO rather than NO has hemodynamic implications during LDLT. Therefore, the increase in COHb during LDLT is predictive of hemodynamic instability.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1620/tjem.243.179

  9 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29402286
[Au] Autor:Barn P; Giles L; Héroux ME; Kosatsky T
[Ad] Address:National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health, 200 - 601 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4C2, Canada. prabjit.barn@bccdc.ca.
[Ti] Title:A review of the experimental evidence on the toxicokinetics of carbon monoxide: the potential role of pathophysiology among susceptible groups.
[So] Source:Environ Health;17(1):13, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1476-069X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Acute high level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure can cause immediate cardio-respiratory arrest in anyone, but the effects of lower level exposures in susceptible persons are less well known. The percentage of CO-bound hemoglobin in blood (carboxyhemoglobin; COHb) is a marker of exposure and potential health outcomes. Indoor air quality guidelines developed by the World Health Organization and Health Canada, among others, are set so that CO exposure does not lead to COHb levels above 2.0%, a target based on experimental evidence on toxicodynamic relationships between COHb and cardiac performance among persons with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The guidelines do not consider the role of pathophysiological influences on toxicokinetic relationships. Physiological deficits that contribute to increased CO uptake, decreased CO elimination, and increased COHb formation can alter relationships between CO exposures and resulting COHb levels, and consequently, the severity of outcomes. Following three fatalities attributed to CO in a long-term care facility (LTCF), we queried whether pathologies other than CVD could alter CO-COHb relationships. Our primary objective was to inform susceptibility-specific modeling that accounts for physiological deficits that may alter CO-COHb relationships, ultimately to better inform CO management in LTCFs. METHODS: We reviewed experimental studies investigating relationships between CO, COHb, and outcomes related to health or physiological outcomes among healthy persons, persons with CVD, and six additional physiologically susceptible groups considered relevant to LTCF residents: persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), anemia, cerebrovascular disease (CBD), heart failure, multiple co-morbidities, and persons of older age (≥ 60 years). RESULTS: We identified 54 studies published since 1946. Six studies investigated toxicokinetics among healthy persons, and the remaining investigated toxicodynamics, mainly among healthy persons and persons with CVD. We identified one study each of CO dynamics in persons with COPD, anemia and persons of older age, and no studies of persons with CBD, heart failure, or multiple co-morbidities. Considerable heterogeneity existed for exposure scenarios and outcomes investigated. CONCLUSIONS: Limited experimental human evidence on the effects of physiological deficits relevant to CO kinetics exists to support indoor air CO guidelines. Both experimentation and modeling are needed to assess how physiological deficits influence the CO-COHb relationship, particularly at sub-acute exposures relevant to indoor environments. Such evidence would better inform indoor air quality guidelines and CO management in indoor settings where susceptible groups are housed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12940-018-0357-2

  10 / 3756 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29395761
[Au] Autor:Kaita Y; Tarui T; Shoji T; Miyauchi H; Yamaguchi Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Trauma and Critical Care Medicine, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Japan. Electronic address: pikoharyuha@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Cyanide poisoning is a possible cause of cardiac arrest among fire victims, and empiric antidote treatment may improve outcomes.
[So] Source:Am J Emerg Med;, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning are important causes of death due to fire. Carbon monoxide is more regularly assessed than cyanide at the site of burn or smoke inhalation treatment due to its ease in assessment and simplicity to treat. Although several forensic studies have demonstrated the significance of cyanide poisoning in fire victims using blood cyanide levels, the association between the cause of cardiac arrest and the concentration of cyanide among fire victims has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest in fire victims and to assess the necessity of early empiric treatment for cyanide poisoning. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of fire victims with cardiac arrest at the scene who were transported to a trauma and critical care center, Kyorin University Hospital, from January 2014 to June 2017. Patients whose concentration of cyanide was measured were included. RESULTS: Five patients were included in the study; all died despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Three of these victims were later found to have lethal cyanide levels (>3 µg/ml). Two of the patients had non-lethal carboxyhemoglobin levels under 50% and might have been saved if hydroxocobalamin had been administered during resuscitation. CONCLUSION: According to our results, cyanide-induced cardiac arrest may be more frequently present among fire victims than previously believed, and early empiric treatment with hydroxocobalamin may improve outcomes for these victims in cases where cardiac arrest is of short duration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180203
[Lr] Last revision date:180203
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 376 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information