Database : MEDLINE
Search on : carotid and body and tumor [Words]
References found : 2009 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 201 go to page                         

  1 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29504908
[Au] Autor:Snezhkina AV; Lukyanova EN; Kalinin DV; Pokrovsky AV; Dmitriev AA; Koroban NV; Pudova EA; Fedorova MS; Volchenko NN; Stepanov OA; Zhevelyuk EA; Kharitonov SL; Lipatova AV; Abramov IS; Golovyuk AV; Yegorov YE; Vishnyakova KS; Moskalev AA; Krasnov GS; Melnikova NV; Shcherbo DS; Kiseleva MV; Kaprin AD; Alekseev BY; Zaretsky AR; Kudryavtseva AV
[Ad] Address:Engelhardt Institute of Molecular Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Exome analysis of carotid body tumor.
[So] Source:BMC Med Genomics;11(Suppl 1):17, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1755-8794
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carotid body tumor (CBT) is a form of head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) arising at the bifurcation of carotid arteries. Paragangliomas are commonly associated with germline and somatic mutations involving at least one of more than thirty causative genes. However, the specific functionality of a number of these genes involved in the formation of paragangliomas has not yet been fully investigated. METHODS: Exome library preparation was carried out using Nextera® Rapid Capture Exome Kit (Illumina, USA). Sequencing was performed on NextSeq 500 System (Illumina). RESULTS: Exome analysis of 52 CBTs revealed potential driver mutations (PDMs) in 21 genes: ARNT, BAP1, BRAF, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDKN2A, CSDE1, FGFR3, IDH1, KIF1B, KMT2D, MEN1, RET, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SETD2, TP53BP1, TP53BP2, and TP53I13. In many samples, more than one PDM was identified. There are also 41% of samples in which we did not identify any PDM; in these cases, the formation of CBT was probably caused by the cumulative effect of several not highly pathogenic mutations. Estimation of average mutation load demonstrated 6-8 mutations per megabase (Mb). Genes with the highest mutation rate were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Exome analysis of 52 CBTs for the first time revealed the average mutation load for these tumors and also identified potential driver mutations as well as their frequencies and co-occurrence with the other PDMs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12920-018-0327-0

  2 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 29400037
[Au] Autor:Estêvão R; Duarte H; Lopes F; Fernandes J; Monteiro E
[Ti] Title:Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in head and neck paragangliomas ­ Report of 14 cases.
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(4):155-8, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a very promising treatment option in neuroendocrine tumours, with good results, but there are only few reports regar­ding its use in paragangliomas. Methods: The authors conduc­ted a retrospective study during the period of May 2011 to February 2014 in an Oncological Centre. Ten patients with jugular-tympanic paragangliomas and four with carotid body paragangliomas were treated with three cycles of Lutetium labelled peptide (177 Lu-DOTATATE). Treatment response was assessed with a PET-CT with 68 Ga-DOTANOC and clinical crite­ria. Results: Ten of the fourteen patients showed a decrea­se in the tumor standard uptake value (SUV) after treat­ment. 90% of patients with Jugulotympanic paraganglio­mas had symptomatic improvement or stabilization. Patients with carotid body paragangliomas and patients with a low uptake of 68 Ga-DOTANOC had a worse response to the treatment. The tumor SUV value was a predictor of treatment response [R= 0,64; F= 8,212; p= 0,014]. Conclusion: Peptide receptor radio­nuclide therapy can be a therapeutic option in selected cases of head and neck paragangliomas.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy
Lutetium/therapeutic use
Paraganglioma/radiotherapy
Radioisotopes/therapeutic use
Radiopharmaceuticals/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging
Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Paraganglioma/diagnostic imaging
Paraganglioma/pathology
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lutetium-177); 0 (Radioisotopes); 0 (Radiopharmaceuticals); 5H0DOZ21UJ (Lutetium)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29496569
[Au] Autor:Kiris M; Sevil E; Muderris T
[Ad] Address:Professor, Gulhane Training and Research Hospital Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Ankara, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Preoperative embolization may increase intraoperative bleeding in carotid body tumor surgery.
[So] Source:Ann Vasc Surg;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1615-5947
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29495959
[Au] Autor:Kakkos SK; Zampakis P; Lampropoulos GC; Paridis L; Kaplanis C; Bantouna D; Nikolakopoulos KM; Papageorgopoulou CP; Kalogeropoulou C; Tsolakis IA
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Patras Medical School, Patras, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Successful Resection of a Large Carotid Body Tumor Masquerading Complete Encasement of the Internal Carotid Artery on Preoperative Imaging.
[So] Source:Vasc Endovascular Surg;:1538574418761722, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1938-9116
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 41-year-old woman presented with a large painful and tender mass of the left side of her neck located just below the angle of the mandible. She was also complaining of frequent attacks of symptoms ranging from dizziness upon resuming the erect position to frank syncope. Color-coded duplex showed a large well-vascularized vascular mass at the level of the carotid bifurcation, suggesting the diagnosis of a carotid body tumor (CBT). A computerized tomographic angiography confirmed the diagnosis of a CBT, which measured 5.7 cm in its craniocaudal axis. The tumor appeared to encase the internal carotid artery (ICA) at the level of its origin, indicating the presence of a Shamblin group 3 tumor. During surgery, the CBT seemingly encased the ICA; however, it was successfully taken off the ICA, by establishing an adventitial dissection place, obviating the need for arterial resection and replacement. A brief intraoperative episode of cardiac arrest was successfully managed. Postoperative course was uneventful, and all symptoms were cured. Pathology confirmed the clinical diagnosis and did not show malignancy. In conclusion, meticulous surgical techniques can spare the ICA from removal or inadvertent injury during CBT surgery and reduce the morbidity often associated with the resection of large or advanced tumors but also cure atypical patient symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1538574418761722

  5 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29372869
[Au] Autor:Dolera M; Carrara N; Malfassi L
[Ad] Address:From the La Cittadina Fondazione Studi e Ricerche Veterinarie, Romanengo, Italy.
[Ti] Title:VMAT Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in a Multimodal Approach to a Carotid Paraganglioma in a Dog.
[So] Source:J Am Anim Hosp Assoc;54(2):111-116, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0587-2871
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 7 yr old female pit bull terrier was presented for a cervical soft tissue swelling located in the left jugular region. No abnormalities were present at physical examination or in the laboratory workup. Computed tomography and MRI scans showed a well-defined, ovoid, single mass in the left dorsal cervical region connected to the common carotid artery, histologically consistent with carotid body paraganglioma. The mass was surgically resected. Frameless stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy was set up as adjuvant treatment. After radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy with carboplatin was started. During the first yr of follow-up, acute grade I dermatitis and grade I left-side laryngeal mucositis were recognized. One yr after radiation therapy, no signs of late radiotoxicity or tumor recurrence were observed. Grade I thrombocytopenia concurrent with chemotherapy was observed. This is the first reported case of a carotid body paraganglioma treated by multimodal therapy, with surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Stereotactic body radiation therapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment after surgery provided excellent disease control and was well tolerated with slight side effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5326/JAAHA-MS-6389

  6 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29423543
[Au] Autor:Tamura A; Nakasato T; Izumisawa M; Nakayama M; Ishida K; Shiga K; Ehara S
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, 020-8505, Japan. a.akahane@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Same-Day Preventive Embolization and Surgical Excision of Carotid Body Tumor.
[So] Source:Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1432-086X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00270-018-1894-3

  7 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29320547
[Au] Autor:Augustemak de Lima LR; Petroski EL; Moreno YMF; Silva DAS; Trindade EBMS; Carvalho AP; Back IC
[Ad] Address:Research Centre for Kinanthropometry and Human Performance. Department of Physical Education. Federal University of Santa Catarina. Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Dyslipidemia, chronic inflammation, and subclinical atherosclerosis in children and adolescents infected with HIV: The PositHIVe Health Study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0190785, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:HIV-infected children and adolescents may be at risk for cardiovascular disease due to chronic inflammation and exacerbation of risk factors. The aim of this study was as follows: 1) compare cardiovascular risk factors, chronic inflammation, and carotid intima-media thickness (IMTc) between the HIV and control groups; 2) determine the association of HIV and antiretroviral (ART) regimens with cardiovascular risk factors, chronic inflammation, and IMTc; and 3) identify variables associated with elevated IMTc. Cross-sectional analysis of 130 children and adolescents, 8-15 years of age, divided into HIV-infected (n = 65) and healthy control (n = 65) participants. Body fat, blood pressure, glycemia, insulin, and glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol and fractions (LDL-C and HDL-C), triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and the IMTc were measured. The results showed HIV-infected children and adolescents had higher levels of glycemia (87.9 vs. 75.9 mg.dL-1, p< 0.001), LDL-c (94.7 vs. 79.5 mg.dL-1, p = 0.010), triglycerides (101.2 vs. 61.6 mg.dL-1, p< 0.001), CRP (1.6 vs. 1.0 mg.L-1, p = 0.007), IL-6 (1.42 vs. 0.01 pg.mL-1, p< 0.001), TNF-α (0.49 vs. 0.01 pg.mL-1, p< 0.001), mean IMTc (0.526 vs. 0.499 mm, p = 0.009), and lower HDL-c (53.7 vs. 69.4 mg.dL-1, p< 0.001) compared to controls. Systolic blood pressure (ß = 0.006, p = 0.004) and TNF-α (ß = -0.033, p = 0.029) accounted for 16% of IMTc variability in HIV-infected children and adolescents. In patients using protease inhibitors-based ART, male gender (ß = -0.186, p = 0.008), trunk body fat (ß = -0.011, p = 0.006), glucose (ß = 0.005, p = 0.046), and IL-6 (ß = 0.017, p = 0.039) accounted for 28% of IMTc variability. HIV-infected children and adolescents may be at risk for premature atherosclerosis due to chronic inflammation and dyslipidemia. Interventions with the potential to improve lipid profile, mitigate inflammation, and reduce cardiovascular risk are needed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Atherosclerosis/complications
Dyslipidemias/complications
HIV Infections/complications
Inflammation/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adiposity
Adolescent
Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use
Atherosclerosis/diagnostic imaging
Atherosclerosis/epidemiology
Atherosclerosis/physiopathology
Biomarkers/blood
Blood Glucose
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dyslipidemias/diagnostic imaging
Dyslipidemias/epidemiology
Dyslipidemias/physiopathology
Female
HIV Infections/diagnostic imaging
HIV Infections/drug therapy
HIV Infections/physiopathology
Humans
Inflammation/diagnostic imaging
Inflammation/epidemiology
Inflammation/physiopathology
Interleukin-6/blood
Lipids/blood
Male
Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Retroviral Agents); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (IL6 protein, human); 0 (Interleukin-6); 0 (Lipids); 0 (Protease Inhibitors)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180111
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0190785

  8 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29398127
[Au] Autor:Gebhardt BJ; Vargo JA; Ling D; Jones B; Mohney M; Clump DA; Ohr JP; Ferris RL; Heron DE
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiation Oncology, UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:Carotid Dosimetry and the Risk of Carotid Blowout Syndrome After Reirradiation With Head and Neck Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.
[So] Source:Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys;, 2017 Dec 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-355X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To correlate carotid dose and risk of carotid blowout syndrome (CBOS) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), hypothesizing that carotid dose does not correlate with CBOS. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We retrospectively reviewed 186 patients with recurrent, previously irradiated head and neck cancer treated between January 2008 and March 2013. Patients treated early in our experience with incomplete dosimetry were excluded from analysis (n = 111). A total of 75 patients were identified, providing 150 carotid arteries for analysis. Median follow-up was 8 months (range, 1-91 months) for all patients, and 37 months for surviving patients (range, 31-91 months). Patients were treated with linear accelerator-based SBRT to a median dose up to 44 Gy (range, 40-50 Gy) in 5 fractions delivered on a twice-weekly basis. Concurrent cetuximab was used in 63 patients (84%). The bilateral common, internal, and external carotid arteries were delineated 2 cm above and below the planning target volume. The maximum dose to 0.1 cm (D ), 1 cm (D ), and 2 cm (D ) of the carotid and the mean carotid dose from SBRT were recorded and analyzed for association with carotid bleeding events, using binary logistic regression. RESULTS: Median reirradiation interval was 20 months (range, 3-423 months), and median prior radiation dose was 70 Gy (range, 52.5-140 Gy). Sixteen patients (21.3%) received more than 1 course of SBRT, and the cumulative carotid doses from fused summary plans were recorded. The overall median D D D , and mean carotid doses were 40.8 Gy (interquartile range [IQR], 21.6-47.6 Gy), 26.8 Gy (IQR, 14.1-42.1 Gy), 15.4 Gy (IQR, 8.4-32.7 Gy), and 15.0 Gy (IQR, 8.9-23.3 Gy), respectively. There were a total of 4 bleeding events (5.3%): 2 patients (2.7%) had mucosal bleeds that resolved after embolization of carotid branches, and 2 patients (2.7%) died from complications of CBOS. In the 2 patients with CBOS the D was 48.4 Gy and 47.6 Gy, respectively. There was no significant association between bleeding events and D (P = .280), D (P = .571), or mean dose (P = .568). There was a trend toward increased risk of bleeding and D (P = .080). CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate a low risk of bleeding after reirradiation with SBRT when 5 fractions are delivered on nonconsecutive days, even when tumor is completely encasing the carotid artery. Although limited by the low number of events, no significant association was found between dose-volume parameters and the risk of carotid bleeding. No CBOS was noted when D was <47.6 Gy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180205
[Lr] Last revision date:180205
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29147633
[Au] Autor:Itawi SA; Buehler M; Mrak RE; Mansour TR; Medhkour Y; Medhkour A
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center.
[Ti] Title:A Unique Case of Carotid Splaying by a Cervical Vagal Neurofibroma and the Role of Neuroradiology in Surgical Management.
[So] Source:Cureus;9(9):e1658, 2017 Sep 07.
[Is] ISSN:2168-8184
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Carotid splaying, also known as the Lyre sign, is a widening of the carotid bifurcation due to the displacement of the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery just distal to the point of divergence. This phenomenon is classically exhibited by highly vascularized carotid body tumors and, in rare cases, by cervical sympathetic chain schwannomas. Demonstration of the Lyre sign by a cervical vagal neurofibroma, however, is a unique occurrence that has not been previously documented in the literature. Neurofibromas are slow growing, poorly vascularized soft tissue masses and are a hallmark of the autosomal dominant genetic disorder, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). While targeted genetic therapies are evolving, management is currently dependent on a case-by-case resection of tumors with specific indications for chemo and radiation therapy. These resections rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize tumor location and infiltration, but even in the setting of an established NF-1 diagnosis, additional imaging can be beneficial in ruling out more precarious tumors and optimizing surgical outcomes. In this case, a 25-year-old female with known NF-1 presented with an enlarging cervical mass that demonstrated splaying of the left internal and external carotid arteries on MRI. Due to the typical association of the Lyre sign with carotid body tumors, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was crucial in guiding surgical decision making. Carotid body tumors are highly vascularized, may compress carotid branches, and carry a high risk of intraoperative bleeding. They are best visualized with MRA, which assesses carotid splaying and patency, and demonstrates vascular blushing within the tumor.  This patient's MRA demonstrated the Lyre sign, patency of all carotid vessels, and a lack of vascularity within the mass, thus lowering suspicion for a carotid body tumor. Intraoperative use of imaging results facilitated a successful resection of a soft tissue tumor with minimal blood loss and no complications. Postoperative histologic examination confirmed a neurofibroma and definitively ruled out a carotid body tumor. This case highlights the importance of utilizing MRA whenever carotid splaying is seen on MRI and supports the consideration of neurofibromas in the differential for this finding.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171119
[Lr] Last revision date:171119
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.7759/cureus.1658

  10 / 2009 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29147595
[Au] Autor:Paraskevopoulos K; Cheva A; Papaemmanuil S; Vahtsevanos K; Antoniades K
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, General Hospital G. Papanikolaou, 57010 Thessaloniki, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Synchronous Ganglioneuroma and Schwannoma Mistaken for Carotid Body Tumor.
[So] Source:Case Rep Otolaryngol;2017:7973034, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2090-6765
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ganglioneuromas are a very rare benign neural tumor, commonly derived from the ganglia of the sympathetic system, and are composed of mature Schwann cells, ganglion cells, and nerve fibres. They may arise anywhere from the base of the skull to the pelvis along the paravertebral sympathetic plexus. We report a rare case of synchronous ganglioneuroma and schwannoma, mistaken for carotid body tumor. The coexistence of these two entities in head and neck region is very rare.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171119
[Lr] Last revision date:171119
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/7973034


page 1 of 201 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information