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[PMID]: 29455048
[Au] Autor:Ban MJ; Jung JY; Kim JW; Park KN; Lee SW; Koh YW; Park JH
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea; Department of Medicine, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:A clinical prediction score to determine surgical drainage of deep neck infection: A retrospective case-control study.
[So] Source:Int J Surg;52:131-135, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1743-9159
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The objective of this retrospective study was to identify predictors of an abscess guaranteed to be surgically drained successfully in patients with deep neck infection (DNI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We divided 97 consecutive patients with DNI into a drained group and a non-drained group. We then developed a clinical prediction score and validated it in 32 further patients. RESULTS: Significant predictors of successful surgical drainage (i.e., positive for pus) were rim enhancement on computed tomography, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio. The estimated cut-off values (excluding rim enhancement, which is a yes/no parameter) were 41.25, 56.5, and 8.02, respectively, and the clinical prediction score for each of the four other factors was determined to be 2, 2, 3, and 3 points, respectively. The cut-off score for the sum of these points was 6.5 and the scoring system had an accuracy of 87.5% in the validation group. CONCLUSION: Our clinical prediction scoring system can predict whether drainage is successful in patients with DNI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 11046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523775
[Au] Autor:Schloss M; Becak D; Tosto ST; Velayati A
[Ad] Address:Medical Student, Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine, Dothan, AL, USA.
[Ti] Title:A Case of Levofloxacin-Induced Hepatotoxicity.
[So] Source:Am J Case Rep;19:272-276, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1941-5923
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND Levofloxacin covers a broad spectrum of pathogens and is readily prescribed by clinicians. Hepatotoxicity is a known but unusual complication of levofloxacin use. Here, we present a case of severe transaminitis caused by levofloxacin. CASE REPORT A young man in his thirties with a history of asthma, chronic alcoholism, methamphetamine intravenous drug abuse (IVDA), and non-compliant insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) presented to an emergency department with suicidal ideation. Vital signs were stable and the patient was noted to have cellulitis of the right forearm, for which cultures were drawn, and he received IV clindamycin. He was admitted to behavioral medicine for further care. Blood cultures were positive for gram-negative rods and he was transferred to the medicine ward. Cultures eventually grew Brevundimonas diminuta. Clindamycin was discontinued and he was started on levofloxacin. Transaminase levels measured soon after levofloxacin administration showed aminotransferase levels raised to approximately 50 times baseline within a few days. Levofloxacin was discontinued due to concern about drug-induced hepatotoxicity. After discontinuation, transaminase levels decreased immediately. Work-up for other causes of transaminitis revealed no other etiology. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians should remain mindful that levofloxacin can induce hepatotoxicity in rare cases. In patients presenting with acute liver injury who have recently taken levofloxacin, it would be wise to remain cognizant of the possibility of levofloxacin-induced hepatotoxicity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29522137
[Au] Autor:Reich P; Shute T; Lysen C; Lockhart SR; Kelly Keating M; Custer P; Orscheln R
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
[Ti] Title:Saksenaea vasiformis Orbital Cellulitis in an Immunocompetent Child Treated With Posaconazole.
[So] Source:J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:2048-7207
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An 11-year-old immunocompetent girl presented with two and a half months of progressive right orbital cellulitis, which did not respond to multiple courses of antibiotics or prednisone. A panfungal polymerase chain reaction primer was positive for Saksenaea vasiformis, and she completed 5 months of oral posaconazole therapy after debridement. Saksenaea vasiformis is a rare cause of zygomycosis, and it typically causes skin and soft tissue infection in immunocompetent hosts, particularly after a traumatic injury. The diagnosis should be considered in cases with a protracted course that fail to respond to typical antibiotic therapy. Treatment includes surgical debridement, in additional to antifungal therapy with amphotericin B or posaconazole.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jpids/piy021

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[PMID]: 29521765
[Au] Autor:Aubin-Lemay C; Acar P; Alnaif N; Alamri A; Azzi AJ; Cugno S
[Ad] Address:Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University, Montreal.
[Ti] Title:An Extremely Rare Cause of Orbital Emphysema in a Child.
[So] Source:J Craniofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1536-3732
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The authors present a rare case of nontraumatic medial orbital wall fracture in an 11-year-old girl. Fractures of the orbital wall secondary to nose blowing have not been previously described in the pediatric population. The patient reported a history of chronic forceful nose blowing, followed by periorbital swelling after an episode of vigorous nose blowing. Erroneous diagnoses of sinusitis and periorbital cellulitis lead to unnecessary antibiotic treatment. The authors hypothesize that repeated and aggressive nose blowing is analogous to stress fractures, leading to weakening and eventual fracture of the medial orbital wall.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/SCS.0000000000004465

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[PMID]: 29450710
[Au] Autor:Jabarin B; Eviatar E; Israel O; Marom T; Gavriel H
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Tel Aviv University Sackler School of Medicine, 70300, Zerifin, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Indicators for imaging in periorbital cellulitis secondary to rhinosinusitis.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(4):943-948, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Our objective was to identify the clinical indicators for subperiosteal orbital abscess (SPOA) among patients who present with periorbital cellulitis secondary to rhinosinusitis, and to evaluate the need for performing a computerized tomography (CT) scan. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to our tertiary care emergency department between 2006 and 2014 was conducted. Included were healthy patients with acute periorbital cellulitis secondary to rhinosinusitis. Variables analyzed included age, gender, duration of symptoms, previous antibiotic therapy, highest recorded temperature, physical examination findings, ophthalmologist's examination results, laboratory results, and interpretation of imaging studies, when performed. RESULTS: Of the 123 identified patients, 78 (63%) were males, with a mean age of 4years (range 1-70). 68 patients were categorized as Chandler's 1 disease, 2 as Chandler's 2, and 53 as Chandler's 3. 68 patients underwent a CT scan, of those 53 had SPOA. Proptosis and ophthalmoplegia were strongly associated with the presence of an abscess (P < 0.001). However, 14 patients with no ophthalmoplegia or proptosis who underwent a CT scan were older (mean age, 10 years; P < 0.028), and had higher neutrophil count of 78 versus 59% (P = 0.01). This group of patients had a clinically rapidly progressive disease, receiving wider broad-spectrum antibiotics or had their antibiotic treatment replaced to broader spectrum antibiotics through their course of treatment (48.2% compared to only 6.1%). CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed that patients with proptosis and/or limitation of extraocular movements are at high risk for developing SPOA, yet many do not have these predictors. Other features can identify patients who do not have proptosis and/or limitation of extraocular movements but do have significant risk of SPOA, and in these cases performing an imaging study is strongly suggested.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4897-4

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[PMID]: 29267868
[Au] Autor:Senderoff DM
[Ad] Address:Dr Senderoff is a plastic surgeon in private practice in New York, NY.
[Ti] Title:Biceps Augmentation Using Solid Silicone Implants.
[So] Source:Aesthet Surg J;, 2017 Dec 18.
[Is] ISSN:1527-330X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Biceps augmentation using solid silicone implants has been increasingly requested in recent years despite a paucity of literature evaluating the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to provide information about complications, surgical planning, and aesthetic outcomes of biceps augmentation. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients undergoing solid silicone biceps augmentation in the author's practice from April 2011 through May 2016. Collected data were analyzed to assess the indications for surgery, quantity of complications, and need for surgical revision, and to evaluate aesthetic outcome. Results: Twenty-one male patients were included in the study. The mean age was 42.6 years and the mean follow up was 7.1 months. Indications for surgery include a desire to increase biceps size (n = 16), and correction of biceps deformity after biceps tendon rupture (n = 5). Eight patients underwent subfascial implant placement and 13 submuscular implant placement. Complications occurred in 10 patients (48%) including asymmetry (n = 4), seroma (n = 3), surgical site infection (SSI) (n = 1), cellulitis (n = 1), and hematoma (n = 1). The overall reoperation rate was 23.8%. Implant malposition occurred in 3 of the 8 (38%) of subfascial implant placement patients. Complications requiring revision surgery were higher for subfascial implants 37.5% vs 15.4% for submuscular. Conclusions: Biceps augmentation with a solid silicone implant can increase upper arm volume and correct asymmetry and deformity resulting from muscle injury. Submuscular biceps implant placement is recommended over subfascial insertion to avoid implant malposition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/asj/sjx164

  7 / 11046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512304
[Au] Autor:Eren D; Eroglu E; Ulu Kilic A; Atalay MA; Mumcu N; Sipahioglu MH; Canoz O; Koc AN; Oymak O
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, Erciyes University Medical School, Kayseri, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Cutaneous Ulcerations due to Paecilomyces variotii in a renal transplant recipient.
[So] Source:Transpl Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3062
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Skin infections caused by Paecilomyces species have been rarely described in patients with solid organ transplantation. Cutaneous manifestations are highly variable and include erythematous macules, nodules, pustules, and vesicular and necrotic lesions. The diagnosis of these infections is generally made by examination of a skin biopsy. Management of these fungal infections is difficult due to the immunocompromised state of the patients. Moreover, antifungal therapy and immunosuppressive drug interactions should be considered during treatment management. Herein, we reported a case of cellulitis caused by Paecilomyces variotii in a 56-year old man who had undergone a kidney transplantation. Erythematous macular and nodular lesions on the left hand and left foot appeared first; within two months the skin lesions became ulcerated, hemorrhagic and progressively painful and the patient was admitted to our hospital. The diagnosis was made by skin biopsy and tissue culture. The skin lesions resolved by the sixth week of the treatment with voriconazole. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tid.12871

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[PMID]: 29403332
[Au] Autor:Temnogorod J; Shinder R
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.
[Ti] Title:The best of the best: a review of select oculoplastic case series published in 2015.
[So] Source:Digit J Ophthalmol;23(4):1-3, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1542-8958
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This review summarizes three case series published in the field of oculoplastic surgery in the year 2015. The first article describes the use of hedgehog pathway inhibitors for medical therapy of advanced periocular basal cell carcinoma and basal cell nevus syndrome. The second describes the use of c-reactive protein as a marker for starting treatment with steroids in children with orbital cellulitis. The third article presents an endoscopic medial orbital fat decompression technique for treatment of proptosis in thyroid eye disease.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Eye Diseases/surgery
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Periodicals as Topic
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Retrospective Studies
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5693/djo.01.2017.09.001

  9 / 11046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29368551
[Au] Autor:Morgan K; Thomas M
[Ad] Address:National Lymphoedema Education and Research Lead, Lymphoedema Network Wales, Cimla Health and Social Care Centre, Neath, Wales, UK.
[Ti] Title:The development of a 'wet leg' pathway for chronic oedema.
[So] Source:Int J Palliat Nurs;24(1):40-46, 2018 Jan 02.
[Is] ISSN:1357-6321
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chronic oedema and leaking lymphorrhoea can be distressing and challenging for patients to live with. This article introduces the Chronic Oedema 'Wet Leg' Pathway, which became an output from the Lymphoedema Network Wales 'On the Ground Education Project' ( Thomas et al, 2017 ). The evidence-based pathway provides nurses and therapists with clear guidelines to support prompt, efficient and effective management of all patients with chronic oedema and wet legs. This article presents the evidence and demonstrates the benefits of timely active treatment for all patients with leaking lymphorrhoea, which includes decreasing pain and improving mobility and daily activities. Other benefits include reducing the risk of cellulitis and the development of chronic wounds. The pathway also demonstrates opportunities for the NHS by decreasing both the number of community nursing visits and the number of wound dressings used. By actively treating symptoms-rather than simply mopping up the leaking lymphorrhoea-this pathway demonstrates value-based health care by reducing waste, harm and variation within the NHS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.12968/ijpn.2018.24.1.40

  10 / 11046 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29506873
[Au] Autor:Mahmood H; Flora H; Murphy C; Sutton D
[Ad] Address:Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Duckworth Lane, Bradford BD9 6RJ. Electronic address: hanya.mahmood@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Retrobulbar abscess: rare complication after repair of an oroantral communication.
[So] Source:Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1532-1940
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present the case of a retrobulbar abscess that developed secondary to the repair of an oroantral communication. Orbital abscesses have been described in relation to odontogenic infections, facial injury, sinusitis, and after dental extractions but, to the best of our knowledge, none has been reported in these circumstances. Retrobulbar abscess is a rare complication, but early clinical and radiological diagnosis, and urgent decompression are vital because it comes with considerable risk of irreversible visual impairment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher


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