Database : MEDLINE
Search on : cephaelis [Words]
References found : 27 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 3 go to page          

  1 / 27 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29199255
[Au] Autor:Tanahashi T
[Ad] Address:Kobe Pharmaceutical University.
[Ti] Title:[Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Some Medicinal Plants and Cultivated Lichen Mycobionts].
[So] Source:Yakugaku Zasshi;137(12):1443-1482, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1347-5231
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:Studies on the structural determination, biosynthesis, and biological activities of secondary metabolites from natural sources are significant in the field of natural products chemistry. This review focuses on diverse secondary metabolites isolated from medicinal plants and cultivated mycobionts of lichens in our laboratory. Monoterpene-tetrahydroisoquinoline glycosides and alkaloids isolated from Cephaelis acuminata and Alangium lamarckii gave important information on the biosynthesis of ipecac alkaloids. A variety of glycosides linked with a secologanin unit and indole alkaloids were obtained from medicinal plants belonging to the families of Rubiaceae, Apocynaceae, and Loganiaceae. Plant species of the four genera Fraxinus, Syringa, Jasminum, and Ligustrum of the family Oleaceae were chemically investigated to provide several types of secoiridoid and iridoid glucosides. The biosynthetic pathway leading from protopine to benzophenanthridine alkaloids in suspension cell cultures of Eschscholtzia californica was elucidated. The structures and biological activities of the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids of Stephania cepharantha and Nelumbo nucifera were also investigated. In addition, the mycobionts of lichens were cultivated to afford various types of metabolites that differ from the lichen substances of intact lichens but are structurally similar to fungal metabolites. The biosynthetic origins of some metabolites were also studied. These findings suggest that cultures of lichen mycobionts could be sources of new bioactive compounds and good systems for investigating secondary metabolism in lichens.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alkaloids/isolation & purification
Glycosides/isolation & purification
Lichens/metabolism
Plants, Medicinal/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alangiaceae/metabolism
Alkaloids/biosynthesis
Alkaloids/chemistry
Benzylisoquinolines
Cephaelis/metabolism
Eschscholzia/metabolism
Glycosides/biosynthesis
Glycosides/chemistry
Iridoids
Monoterpenes
Oleaceae/metabolism
Rubiaceae/metabolism
Stephania/metabolism
Tetrahydroisoquinolines
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Alkaloids); 0 (Benzylisoquinolines); 0 (Glycosides); 0 (Iridoids); 0 (Monoterpenes); 0 (Tetrahydroisoquinolines); 56W89FBX3E (1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171205
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1248/yakushi.17-00147

  2 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 27145237
[Au] Autor:Kratz JM; Mair CE; Oettl SK; Saxena P; Scheel O; Schuster D; Hering S; Rollinger JM
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacognosy, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
[Ti] Title:hERG Channel Blocking Ipecac Alkaloids Identified by Combined In Silico - In Vitro Screening.
[So] Source:Planta Med;82(11-12):1009-15, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0221
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blocking is associated with QT interval prolongation and increased risk of potentially fatal arrhythmias. As natural products keep increasing in popularity, there is an urgent need for studies assessing human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel-related cardiotoxic risks. We selected 49 plant species based on the results of a pharmacophore-based virtual screening campaign, in parallel with a literature data survey concerning highly consumed herbal medicines with reported cardiac liabilities. Lead-like enhanced extracts were prepared, an initial in vitro screening was performed at 100 µg/mL by voltage clamp on Xenopus oocytes, and five human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blocking extracts were identified. In accordance to the six virtually predicted alkaloids, the root extract of Carapichea ipecacuanha inhibited human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel currents by 32.5 %. A phytochemical workflow resulted in the isolation and identification of five out of the six virtually predicted alkaloids. All isolates blocked human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel currents to different extents. The major ipecac constituents emetine (1) and cephaeline (2) showed IC50 values of 21.4 and 5.3 µM, respectively, measured by whole-cell patch clamp in HEK293 cells. This is the first report on human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel blockers from C. ipecacuanha. Its roots and rhizomes are used to produce different pharmacopeial ipecac preparations that are mainly used as emetics for poisoning treatment. Our findings raise further questions regarding the safety and over-the-counter appropriateness of these herbal products.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alkaloids/pharmacology
Cephaelis/chemistry
Ether-A-Go-Go Potassium Channels/antagonists & inhibitors
Ipecac/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alkaloids/chemistry
Alkaloids/isolation & purification
Animals
Computer Simulation
Humans
Ipecac/chemistry
Molecular Structure
Xenopus laevis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Alkaloids); 0 (Ether-A-Go-Go Potassium Channels); 8012-96-2 (Ipecac)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170316
[Lr] Last revision date:170316
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1055/s-0042-105572

  3 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24050669
[Au] Autor:Shen Y; van Beek TA; Zuilhof H; Chen B
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands; Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine Research, Ministry of Education, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Hyphenation of optimized microfluidic sample preparation with nano liquid chromatography for faster and greener alkaloid analysis.
[So] Source:Anal Chim Acta;797:50-6, 2013 Oct 03.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4324
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A glass liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) microchip with three parallel 3.5 cm long and 100 µm wide interconnecting channels was optimized in terms of more environmentally friendly (greener) solvents and extraction efficiency. In addition, the optimized chip was successfully hyphenated with nano-liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and mass spectrometric detection (nanoLC-UV-MS) for on-line analysis. In this system, sample pretreatment, separation and detection are integrated, which significantly shortens the analysis time, saves labor and drastically reduces solvent consumption. Strychnine was used as model analyte to determine the extraction efficiency of the optimized 3-phase chip. Influence of organic solvent, pH of feed phase, type of alkaloid, and flow rates were investigated. The results demonstrated that the 3-phase chip nanoLC-UV/MS hyphenation combines rapid (~25 s) and efficient (extraction efficiency >90%) sample prep, with automated alkaloid analyses. The method was applied to real samples including Strychnos nux-vomica seeds, Cephaelis ipecacuanha roots, Atropa belladonna leaves, and Vinca minor leaves.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alkaloids/isolation & purification
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/instrumentation
Liquid-Liquid Extraction/instrumentation
Microfluidic Analytical Techniques/instrumentation
Plants/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acetates/chemistry
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/economics
Equipment Design
Green Chemistry Technology/economics
Green Chemistry Technology/instrumentation
Liquid-Liquid Extraction/economics
Microfluidic Analytical Techniques/economics
Solvents/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Acetates); 0 (Alkaloids); 0 (Solvents); 464P5N1905 (butyl acetate)
[Em] Entry month:1404
[Cu] Class update date: 130920
[Lr] Last revision date:130920
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:130921
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 22683904
[Au] Autor:Manzali de Sá I; Elisabetsky E
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Botânica, Museu Nacional/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Quinta da Boa Vista, s/n, São Cristóvão, 20940-040 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. ivmanzali@gmail.com
[Ti] Title:Medical knowledge exchanges between Brazil and Portugal: an ethnopharmacological perspective.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;142(3):762-8, 2012 Aug 01.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Like many traditional medical systems found at Latin America, the very existence of a Brazilian traditional medical system is debated. Despite the absence of written material and organized knowledge, there is little doubt that Brazilians from all regions and all social classes recognize and access an estimated 4000 plant species with alleged therapeutic purposes as well as medicinal practices ranging from bone setting to spiritual healing. This "Brazilian folk medicine" is usually described as a rich mixture of African, European, and Indigenous medical traditions. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study questions this view, and argues it is both simplistic and Eurocentric. MATERIALS AND METHODS: By scrutinizing the origins of the medical uses of Zingiberis officinale, Curcuma longa, Ruta officinalis, Cephaelis ipecacuanha, Pilocarpus pinnatifolius, and curare (Chondrodendron, Abuta and Curarea), we illustrate the intense circulation of materials during imperial times. We further discuss how these practices articulated with local medical knowledge, and exemplify some of the ways by which knowledge was produced, transformed, incorporated, and resignified over time. DISCUSSION: Though not a systematic or comprehensive analysis of Brazilian folk medicine development, these selected examples show that, in opposition to usual simplistic descriptions, complex and convoluted manners of medicinal plant development occurred over time to compound both the Brazilian and European pharmaceutical armamentarium.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Information Dissemination
Medicine, Traditional
Plants, Medicinal
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Brazil
Cephaelis
Curare
Curcuma
Ethnopharmacology
Ginger
Humans
Pilocarpus
Portugal
Ruta
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:8063-06-7 (Curare)
[Em] Entry month:1212
[Cu] Class update date: 120716
[Lr] Last revision date:120716
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:120612
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jep.2012.05.058

  5 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 22041104
[Au] Autor:Berger A; Fasshuber H; Schinnerl J; Robien W; Brecker L; Valant-Vetschera K
[Ad] Address:Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany, Faculty Centre of Biodiversity, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. andi.berger@univie.ac.at
[Ti] Title:Iridoids as chemical markers of false ipecac (Ronabea emetica), a previously confused medicinal plant.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;138(3):756-61, 2011 Dec 08.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Several roots or rhizomes of rubiaceous species are reportedly used as the emetic and antiamoebic drug ipecac. True ipecac (Carapichea ipecacuanha) is chemically well characterized, in contrast to striated or false ipecac derived from the rhizomes of Ronabea emetica (syn. Psychotria emetica). Besides its previous use as substitute of ipecac, the latter species is applied in traditional medicine of Panama and fruits of its relative Ronabea latifolia are reported as curare additives from Colombia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Compounds of Ronabea emetica were isolated using standard chromatographic techniques, and structurally characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Organ specific distribution in Ronabea emetica as well as in Ronabea latifolia was further assessed by comparative HPLC analysis. RESULTS: Four iridoid-glucosides, asperuloside (1), 6α-hydroxygeniposide (2), deacetylasperulosidic acid (3) and asperulosidic acid (4) were extracted from leaves of Ronabea emetica. Rhizomes, used in traditional medicine, were dominated by 3. HPLC profiles of Ronabea latifolia were largely corresponding. These results contrast to the general tendency of producing emetine-type and indole alkaloids in species of Psychotria and closely related genera and merit chemotaxonomic significance, characterizing the newly delimited genus Ronabea. CONCLUSIONS: The aim of the work was to resolve the historic problem of adulteration of ipecac by establishing the chemical profile of Ronabea emetica, the false ipecac, as one of its less known sources. The paper demonstrates that different sources of ipecac can be distinguished by their phytochemistry, thus contributing to identifying adulterations of true ipecac.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antiemetics/analysis
Cephaelis/chemistry
Iridoids/analysis
Plant Extracts/analysis
Psychotria/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Drug Contamination
Fruit/chemistry
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Plant Leaves/chemistry
Plant Stems/chemistry
Plants, Medicinal/chemistry
Rhizome/chemistry
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antiemetics); 0 (Iridoids); 0 (Plant Extracts)
[Em] Entry month:1204
[Cu] Class update date: 111202
[Lr] Last revision date:111202
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:111102
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jep.2011.10.024

  6 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 20600752
[Au] Autor:Guerrero EI; Morán-Pinzón JA; Ortíz LG; Olmedo D; del Olmo E; López-Pérez JL; San Feliciano A; Gupta MP
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Panamá, Panama. guerrerodleon@gmail.com
[Ti] Title:Vasoactive effects of different fractions from two Panamanians plants used in Amerindian traditional medicine.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;131(2):497-501, 2010 Sep 15.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cecropia obtusifolia (Cecropiaceae) and Psychotria poeppigiana (Synonym: Cephaelis elata, Rubiaceae) are two Latin American plants broadly used in traditional Amerindian medicine. The former, together with many other species of the genus Cecropia, share the folk reputation of curing heart failure, cough, asthma and bronchitis. The latter is used in Panama by Kuna and Ngäbe Buglé (Guaymies) native Indians for the treatment of dyspnea. AIM OF THE STUDY: Based on screening of selected medicinal Panamanian plants by radioligand-binding techniques by Caballero-George et al. (2001), the present study was carried out in order to investigate the vasoactive effects of different fractions from both P. poeppigiana and C. obtusifolia on rat thoracic aorta and identify active fractions and their chemical constituents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Both acid and neutral methanol fractions (P-AMeOH and P-NMeOH) and acid and neutral dichlorometane fractions (P-ADCM and P-NDCM) were obtained from P. poeppigiana crude methanolic and dichlorometane extracts, respectively. Identical fractionation was carried out for C. obtusifolia (C-AMeOH, C-NMeOH, C-ADCM and C-NDCM. Vasorelaxant effect of all fractions, and their inhibition of contractile responses to angiotensin II were evaluated in isolated aortic rings. RESULTS: P-AMeOH, P-NMeOH and P-ADCM fractions induced a concentration-dependent relaxation (43.9+/-1.8%, 35.3+/-4.7% and 52.9+/-3.5%, respectively) in the endothelium-intact aorta precontracted by phenylephrine (PE, 10(-6)M). The relaxation produced by C-AMeOH and C-NMeOH (57.3+/-2.5% and 53.3+/-3.3%, respectively) was greater than the effect produced by C-ADCM and C-NDCM (42.2+/-3.4% and 21.8+/-0.8%, respectively). Only the incubation of the aortic rings with P-AMeOH reduced the maximum contraction induced by angiotensin II at 20.08+/-0.55%. CONCLUSIONS: The direct vasorelaxation effect observed could explain in part the ethnomedical use of these plants in Amerindian traditional medicine. The most active fractions contain phenolic and aromatic acid compounds. Furthermore, P-AMeOH, the only fraction that showed both vasorelaxant effect and inhibition of contractile responses to angiotensin II, is the most rich in aromatic acids compounds and the only one that contains scopoletin.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cecropia Plant/chemistry
Muscle Contraction/drug effects
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/drug effects
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Psychotria/chemistry
Vasodilation/drug effects
Vasodilator Agents/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Angiotensin II/pharmacology
Animals
Aorta, Thoracic/drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethnopharmacology
Humans
Indians, Central American
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Panama
Plant Components, Aerial
Plant Extracts/chemistry
Rats
Rats, Inbred SHR
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Vasoconstrictor Agents/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Vasoconstrictor Agents); 0 (Vasodilator Agents); 11128-99-7 (Angiotensin II)
[Em] Entry month:1105
[Cu] Class update date: 100906
[Lr] Last revision date:100906
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:100706
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.jep.2010.06.036

  7 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 20061395
[Au] Autor:Nomura T; Kutchan TM
[Ad] Address:Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St Louis, Missouri 63132, USA. tnomura@pu-toyama.ac.jp
[Ti] Title:Three new O-methyltransferases are sufficient for all O-methylation reactions of ipecac alkaloid biosynthesis in root culture of Psychotria ipecacuanha.
[So] Source:J Biol Chem;285(10):7722-38, 2010 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1083-351X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha produces ipecac alkaloids, a series of monoterpenoid-isoquinoline alkaloids such as emetine and cephaeline, whose biosynthesis derives from condensation of dopamine and secologanin. Here, we identified three cDNAs, IpeOMT1-IpeOMT3, encoding ipecac alkaloid O-methyltransferases (OMTs) from P. ipecacuanha. They were coordinately transcribed with the recently identified ipecac alkaloid beta-glucosidase Ipeglu1. Their amino acid sequences were closely related to each other and rather to the flavonoid OMTs than to the OMTs involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis. Characterization of the recombinant IpeOMT enzymes with integration of the enzymatic properties of the IpeGlu1 revealed that emetine biosynthesis branches off from N-deacetylisoipecoside through its 6-O-methylation by IpeOMT1, with a minor contribution by IpeOMT2, followed by deglucosylation by IpeGlu1. The 7-hydroxy group of the isoquinoline skeleton of the aglycon is methylated by IpeOMT3 prior to the formation of protoemetine that is condensed with a second dopamine molecule, followed by sequential O-methylations by IpeOMT2 and IpeOMT1 to form cephaeline and emetine, respectively. In addition to this central pathway of ipecac alkaloid biosynthesis, formation of all methyl derivatives of ipecac alkaloids in P. ipecacuanha could be explained by the enzymatic activities of IpeOMT1-IpeOMT3, indicating that they are sufficient for all O-methylation reactions of ipecac alkaloid biosynthesis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cephaelis
Emetics/metabolism
Emetine/analogs & derivatives
Emetine/biosynthesis
Isoenzymes/metabolism
Methyltransferases/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cephaelis/anatomy & histology
Cephaelis/chemistry
Cephaelis/enzymology
Chromatography, Liquid
Emetics/chemistry
Emetine/chemistry
Isoenzymes/classification
Isoenzymes/genetics
Methylation
Methyltransferases/classification
Methyltransferases/genetics
Molecular Sequence Data
Molecular Structure
Phylogeny
Plant Roots/chemistry
Plant Roots/metabolism
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Emetics); 0 (Isoenzymes); 0 (Recombinant Fusion Proteins); EC 2.1.1.- (Methyltransferases); QA971541A1 (cephaelin); X8D5EPO80M (Emetine)
[Em] Entry month:1004
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:100112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1074/jbc.M109.086157

  8 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 18679809
[Au] Autor:Rossi AA; de Oliveira LO; Venturini BA; dos Santos Silva R
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada à Agropecuaria, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, 36570-000 Vicosa, MG, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Genetic diversity and geographic differentiation of disjunct Atlantic and Amazonian populations of Psychotria ipecacuanha (Rubiaceae).
[So] Source:Genetica;136(1):57-67, 2009 May.
[Is] ISSN:1573-6857
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ipecac (Psychotria ipecacuanha) is a perennial, medicinal herb that grows in the understory of semi-deciduous tropical forests in the Neotropics. Ipecacs present a widely disjunct distribution, with two of its three ranges occurring in Brazil. The Amazonian populations are at least 1600 km from the nearest Atlantic populations. This work used ISSR markers to compare the genetic diversity and structure of populations from the two Brazilian ranges. Lower genetic diversity in Amazon populations (P = 60.11%, Hs = 0.18) and higher genetic diversity in Atlantic populations (P = 73.94%, Hs = 0.20) were detected. Differentiation between ranges were high (theta (B) = 0.6838, G(ST)-B = 0.6665). AMOVA revealed that 65.3% of the total molecular variance can be attributed to regional differences between the two ranges. Principal coordinate analyses and cluster analyses organized ipecacs at either individual or population level into two exclusive groups that correspond each to one of the two disjunct ranges, without exception. The results do not support a scenario that postulates human-mediated, long-distance dispersal events as a plausible origin for the distribution of the Brazilian ipecacs, but indicate geographic isolation as a long-standing barrier to genetic exchange and connectivity among populations from different ranges. Conservation implications are discussed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cephaelis/genetics
Genetic Variation
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Conservation of Natural Resources
DNA, Plant/chemistry
Evolution, Molecular
Genetics, Population
Geography
Phylogeny
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant)
[Em] Entry month:0905
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:080806
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10709-008-9309-z

  9 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy

[PMID]: 19227966
[Au] Autor:Lee MR
[Ad] Address:University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
[Ti] Title:Ipecacuanha: the South American vomiting root.
[So] Source:J R Coll Physicians Edinb;38(4):355-60, 2008 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1478-2715
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The story of ipecacuanha, derived from the plant Cephaelis, is a fascinating one. It was discovered in Brazil in the 1600s and then transported to Paris in the latter part of the same century. It was used there by the physician Helvetius on various members of the French royal court to treat the flux (dysentery) with some success. Later, in the eighteenth century, it was taken up by the physician and privateer Thomas Dover and became, with opium, a fundamental constituent of his celebrated powder, which was used widely to treat fevers and agues for the next 200 years. Progress was then delayed until the early 1800s when the School of Chemistry at Paris established that the dried root of ipecac contained two powerful alkaloids, emetine and cephaeline, that consistently caused vomiting and diarrhoea. The discovery of the pathogenic amoeba, Entamoeba histolytica, in the latter part of the nineteenth century, allowed a distinction to be made between the two main forms of dysentery (amoebic and bacillary). Emetine was shown to be active against the amoebic form of dysentery but ineffective against that caused by bacteria. Ipecacuanha, its root and the pure alkaloid emetine have now been abandoned on the grounds of toxicity. They have been replaced by safer, more effective compounds. Nevertheless, they deserve an honoured place in the history of medicine, especially in the search for an effective treatment for amoebic dysentery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dysentery, Amebic/history
Emetics/history
Ipecac/history
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Dysentery, Amebic/drug therapy
Emetics/therapeutic use
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Ipecac/therapeutic use
Plant Roots
South America
[Pt] Publication type:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Emetics); 8012-96-2 (Ipecac)
[Em] Entry month:0903
[Cu] Class update date: 090220
[Lr] Last revision date:090220
[Js] Journal subset:QIS
[Da] Date of entry for processing:090221
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 27 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text

[PMID]: 18927081
[Au] Autor:Nomura T; Quesada AL; Kutchan TM
[Ad] Address:Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63132, USA. tnomura@danforthcenter.org
[Ti] Title:The new beta-D-glucosidase in terpenoid-isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in Psychotria ipecacuanha.
[So] Source:J Biol Chem;283(50):34650-9, 2008 Dec 12.
[Is] ISSN:0021-9258
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ipecac alkaloids produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha such as emetine and cephaeline possess a monoterpenoid-tetrahydroisoquinoline skeleton, which is formed by condensation of dopamine and secologanin. Deglucosylation of one of the condensed products N-deacetylisoipecoside (1 alpha(S)-epimer) is considered to be a part of the reactions for emetine biosynthesis, whereas its 1 beta(R)-epimer N-deacetylipecoside is converted to ipecoside in P. ipecacuanha. Here, we isolated a cDNA clone Ipeglu1 encoding Ipecac alkaloid beta-D-glucosidase from P. ipecacuanha. The deduced protein showed 54 and 48% identities to raucaffricine beta-glucosidase and strictosidine beta-glucosidase, respectively. Recombinant IpeGlu1 enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed glucosidic Ipecac alkaloids except for their lactams, but showed poor or no activity toward other substrates, including terpenoid-indole alkaloid glucosides. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of deglucosylated products of N-deacetylisoipecoside revealed spontaneous transitions of the highly reactive aglycons, one of which was supposed to be the intermediate for emetine biosynthesis. IpeGlu1 activity was extremely poor toward 7-O-methyl and 6,7-O,O-dimethyl derivatives. However, 6-O-methyl derivatives were hydrolyzed as efficiently as non-methylated substrates, suggesting the possibility of 6-O-methylation prior to deglucosylation by IpeGlu1. In contrast to the strictosidine beta-glucosidase that stereospecifically hydrolyzes 3 alpha(S)-epimer in terpenoid-indole alkaloid biosynthesis, IpeGlu1 lacked stereospecificity for its substrates where 1 beta(R)-epimers were preferred to 1 alpha(S)-epimers, although ipecoside (1 beta(R)) is a major alkaloidal glucoside in P. ipecacuanha, suggesting the compartmentalization of IpeGlu1 from ipecoside. These facts have significant implications for distinct physiological roles of 1 alpha(S)- and 1 beta(R)-epimers and for the involvement of IpeGlu1 in the metabolic fate of both of them.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alkaloids/chemistry
Cephaelis/enzymology
Isoquinolines/chemistry
Terpenes/chemistry
beta-Glucosidase/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biochemistry/methods
Cephaelis/metabolism
DNA, Complementary/metabolism
Escherichia coli/metabolism
Kinetics
Models, Chemical
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Protein Structure, Tertiary
Recombinant Proteins/chemistry
Substrate Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Alkaloids); 0 (DNA, Complementary); 0 (Isoquinolines); 0 (Recombinant Proteins); 0 (Terpenes); EC 3.2.1.21 (beta-Glucosidase)
[Em] Entry month:0902
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:081018
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1074/jbc.M806953200


page 1 of 3 go to page          
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information