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[PMID]: 29524873
[Au] Autor:Laslett AM; Jiang H; Chikritzhs T
[Ad] Address:National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Bentley, Perth, 6002, Australia; Centre for Alcohol Policy Research, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, 3086, Australia; School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 3000, Australia. Electronic address: anne-marie.laslett@curtin.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Child injury deaths linked with adult alcohol consumption: A time series analysis.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:360-366, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to quantify the population-level associations between child injury deaths and adult (aged 15+ years) per capita alcohol consumption (PCC) and between child injury deaths and the impact of major alcohol and safety policy changes in Australia. METHODS: All child deaths due to external causes during 1910-2013, and child deaths due specifically to road crashes, assaults, suicide and other external causes, were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Child (0-14 year) mortality rates were analysed in relation to PCC using an Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average model. RESULTS: A positive association between PCC and overall child external mortality was identified. The estimated coefficient was 0.326 (p = .002), indicating that a 10% decrease in PCC was associated with a 3.3% reduction in child injury mortality. A positive association was identified for road traffic and other child injury mortality, but not assault injuries. The introduction of compulsory seatbelt legislation in combination with random breath testing was associated with a reduction in overall injury and road traffic child mortality. Decreasing the legal drinking age was associated with an increase in the rate of other external-cause child mortality. CONCLUSION: Reducing PCC in Australia is likely to result in a small but significant reduction in the injury mortality rate of children aged 0-14 years.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524762
[Au] Autor:Beatriz ED; Salhi C; Griffith JL; Molnar BE
[Ad] Address:Northeastern University, Bouv College of Health Sciences, United States. Electronic address: e.beatriz@northeastern.edu.
[Ti] Title:Urbanicity matters in self-reported child maltreatment prevalence: Findings from a nationally representative study.
[So] Source:Child Abuse Negl;79:371-383, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7757
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite indications that there are differences in rates of child maltreatment (CM) cases in the child protection system between urban and rural areas, there are no published studies examining the differences in self-reported CM prevalence and its correlates by urbanicity. The present study aimed to: (1) identify the distribution of self-reported childhood experiences of maltreatment by urbanicity, (2) assess whether differences by urbanicity persist after adjusting for known risk factors, and (3) explore whether the associations between these risk factors and CM are modified by urban-rural designation. Using nationally representative data from waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, the prevalence of six maltreatment outcomes was estimated for rural, minor urban, and major urban areas (N = 14,322). Multivariable logistic models were estimated identifying if risk associated with urbanicity persisted after adjusting for other risk factors. Interactions between urbanicity and main effects were explored. Prevalence estimates of any CM, poly-victimization, supervision neglect, and physical abuse were significantly higher in major urban areas. Those from major urban areas were more likely to report any maltreatment and supervision neglect even after adjusting for child and family risk factors. The association between race/ethnicity, welfare receipt, low parental educational attainment, and disability status and CM were modified by urbanicity. Significant differences in the prevalence and correlates of CM exist between urban and rural areas. Future research and policy should use self-reported prevalence, in conjunction with official reports, to inform child maltreatment prevention and intervention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524761
[Au] Autor:Vanderfaeillie J; De Ruyck K; Galle J; Van Dooren E; Schotte C
[Ad] Address:Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Department of Lifespan Psychology, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel, Belgium. Electronic address: johan.vanderfaeillie@vub.be.
[Ti] Title:The recognition of child abuse and the perceived need for intervention by school personnel of primary schools: Results of a vignette study on the influence of case, school personnel, and school characteristics.
[So] Source:Child Abuse Negl;79:358-370, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1873-7757
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In 2015, 523 reports of suspected child abuse and neglect (CAN) were brought to the attention of the Confidential Center of Child Abuse and Neglect (CCCAN) of Brussels. Around 38% of these reports came from school personnel. This study investigated which factors affect the recognition of CAN by school personnel of Dutch-speaking primary education in Brussels and their intervention need. Two hundred seventy-nine staff members of 16 schools professionally working with children, filled in a Questionnaire Assessment of Situations of CAN. The instrument consists of 24 vignettes describing CAN. Respondents were asked questions regarding recognition and intervention need about each vignette. Detection, severity assessment, the need for professional help, the need for referral to a CCCAN and the need to involve judicial authorities were mainly associated with case characteristics. Although most situations of CAN were detected, situations of emotional abuse were less often recognized. Situations involving non-Western victims were considered to be more severe and the perceived need for involvement of professional help, CCCAN and judicial authorities was larger. Ethnic stereotypes affect the actions undertaken in case of CAN. Awareness of these reactions may result in equal treatment for all victims. Staff characteristics were little associated with detection and intervention need.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524611
[Au] Autor:Black M; Joseph V; Mott L; Maheswaran R
[Ad] Address:School of Health and Related Research, The University of Sheffield, Regent Court, 30 Regent Street, Sheffield S1 4DA, UK. Electronic address: michelle.black1@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Increasing inequality in childhood obesity in primary schools in a northern English town.
[So] Source:Public Health;158:9-14, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5616
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To undertake an analysis of National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) data to quantify the obesity prevalence gap over time between children in primary schools in the most and least deprived areas of Doncaster. STUDY DESIGN: The research design for this study was retrospective quantitative analysis of secondary data. METHODS: The study undertook secondary analysis of NCMP data on obesity prevalence in children in Reception Year and Year 6 in primary schools in Doncaster for the period 2006-2007 to 2014-2015. Data were combined into three 3-year periods (2006-2007 to 2008-2009; 2009-2010 to 2011-2012; and 2012-2013 to 2014-2015), and schools were grouped by deprivation based on the national Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2015. Analysis was undertaken to assess whether there is a difference in obesity prevalence for Reception Year and Year 6 children in schools in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived (prevalence gap), over time. RESULTS: The difference in obesity prevalence between children attending schools in the most and least deprived areas has increased over time. For Reception Year children, the prevalence gap has widened from a difference of 1.01% higher in the most deprived schools in 2006-2007 to 2008-2009 to 3.64% higher in 2012-2013 to 2014-2015. In the same time periods, for Year 6 children, the obesity prevalence gap has also increased over time from 2.82% to 5.08%. CONCLUSIONS: There is inequality in relation to obesity in primary school children in Doncaster with those in schools in the most deprived areas carrying the greatest burden. Research is needed to understand why the plateau seen nationally is not reaching the most deprived children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524559
[Au] Autor:Greenhawt M; Chan ES; Fleischer DM; Hicks A; Wilson R; Shaker M; Venter C; Stukus D
[Ad] Address:Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Section of Allergy and Immunology, Aurora, CO. Electronic address: Matthew.Greenhawt@childrenscolorado.org.
[Ti] Title:Caregiver and expecting caregiver support for early peanut introduction guidelines.
[So] Source:Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1534-4436
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recent guidelines recommend early peanut introduction (EPI) beginning around 4-6 months in infants with either severe eczema and/or egg allergy, and around 6 months for all other infants. Caregiver preferences for such practices are unkown. METHODS: We explored preferences for EPI and in-office allergy risk assessment (IRA) through a nationally-representative survey of expecting (n=1000) and new caregivers of infants < 1 year (n=1000). RESULTS: Among a primarily female (99.7%), married (80.3%), and white (74.4%) sample, 29% had no/vague awareness of the new guidelines, 61% had no/minimal concern for their child developing food allergy, but 54% felt timing of introduction has moderate/strong importance for developing food allergy. Only 31% expressed willingness for EPI before/around 6 months of life, with 40% reporting willingness to introduce peanut after 11 months of life, similar to tree nuts and seafood. However, 60% reported willingness to introduce egg before 8 months. 51% and 56.8% were unwilling to allow IRA methods such as skin testing and oral challenge before 11 months of life, respectively. Odds of willingness to both delay peanut introduction and undergo challenge after 6 months of life were lower among expecting caregivers (OR 0.79, CI 0.65-0.96; OR 0.67, CI 0.54-0.82, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Among new and expecting caregivers, there is poor current willingness and questionable support for early allergenic solid food recommendations, including IRA before introduction. Willingness was better among expecting versus current caregivers. These trends underscore a need for broader formal implementation planning to facilitate early allergen introduction and maximize its preventive benefits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524473
[Au] Autor:Norman ; Nyberg G; Elinder LS; Berlin A
[Ad] Address:Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: asa.norman@ki.se.
[Ti] Title:Parental strategies for influencing the diet of their children - A qualitative study from disadvantaged areas.
[So] Source:Appetite;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8304
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A social gradient is evident in the prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity, to the disadvantage of children with low socioeconomic status (SES). Parents have a substantial influence on their children's dietary behaviours and weight development through the way they interact with the children around food. This study aims to explore the variation of how parents with low SES influence their child's dietary behaviours. METHODS: A phenomenographic design and analysis was used on 29 sessions of motivational interviewing with mothers and fathers participating in the Healthy School Start intervention study in 2012. The parents had a maximum of 12 years of education and resided in areas targeted for socioeconomic development. In the sessions, parents explored changes that they wanted to make in the home environment regarding their child's dietary behaviours. RESULTS: Five categories of guidance of children's dietary habits were found ranging from silently guiding to enforcement. The categories of guidance were structurally related to each other through positive to negative impact of parental recognition of responsibility for the child's behaviours, level of trust in the child's satiety response, and level of parental emotional distress. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that parents use situation-specific guidance with both negative and positive impacts on child behaviours. Depending on the type of guidance used, parents are in need of different supporting strategies to enhance positive parent-child interplay. Suggestions for intervention strategies are provided where specific focus on parental responsibility recognition, emotional self-regulation, increased responsiveness, and cooperation between parents are highlighted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515737
[Au] Autor:Harouna AD; Mvumbi F; Atarraf K; Chater L; Boubbou M; Afifi A
[Ad] Address:Service de Traumato-orthopdie Pdiatrique, CHU-Hassan II, Fs, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Lipoblastome dcouvert chez le grand enfant: description rare et revue de la littrature. [Lipoblastoma detected in older children: an unusual case and literature review].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:119, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Lipoblastoma is a relatively rare benign tumor. It derives from embryonic white fat cells. It almost exclusively affects children less than 3 years of age. We report a case of lipoblastoma of the left thigh detected in an older child (11 years) and a literature review. Diagnosis was based on histology while surgical treatment was based on total resection of the mass. The postoperative course was simple with a follow-up period of 9 months.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.119.12002

  8 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515732
[Au] Autor:Chouchaine A; Fodha M; Abdelkefi MT; Helali K; Fodha M
[Ad] Address:Service de Chirurgie Gnrale, Hpital Taher Sfar, Mahdia, Tunisie.
[Ti] Title:Agnsie de la vsicule biliaire: propos de trois cas. [Gallbladder agenesis: about three cases].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:114, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Gallbladder agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly. This study aimed to highlight the epidemiological aspects of this condition as well as the peculiarities of its diagnostic and therapeutic management through three case reports. Two adults were admitted to Hospital with hepatic colics and dyspepsia. Ultrasound showed multilithiasic scleroatrophic vesicle. In one of the two patients, CT scan results showed a stone at the level of scleroatrophic vesicle. These two patients were wrongly operated for vesicular lithiasis by using conventional method. The absence of gallbladder was detected during surgery. In order to confirm post-operative diagnosis, the first patient underwent biliary MRI. The other patient was lost to follow-up. The third patient was a 13-year old child hospitalized with acute pancreatitis. Vesicular agenesis was suspected based on its scannographic aspect and then confirmed using biliary MRI. This patient didn't underwent surgery.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.114.11919

  9 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29515720
[Au] Autor:El Bakkaly A; Ettayebi F; Oubeja H; Erraji M; Zerhouni H
[Ad] Address:Service des Urgences Chirurgicales Pdiatriques, CHU Ibn Sina, Facult de Mdecine Mohammed V, Rabat, Maroc.
[Ti] Title:Syndrome de Bean chez l'enfant: propos de deux cas. [Bean's syndrome in children: about two cases].
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;28:102, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Diffuse angiomatosis or Bean's syndrome is a rare disease characterized by venous malformations mainly involving the skin and the digestive tract which can result in hemorrhage of variable severity. This study reports the case of two children aged 5 and 9 and a half years respectively with diffuse angiomatosis who had been treated in the Department of Emergency Paediatric Surgery over the years. The diagnosis was based on rectal bleeding and/or melenas causing severe anemia requiring regular transfusions in both patients as well as skin angiomas occurrence at the level of the limbs. Radiological evaluation showed the presence of multiple lesions at the level of the jejunum and ileum consistent with small intestinal angiomatosis in the child aged 9 and a half years. It didn't show abdominal lesions in the child aged 5 years. The two patients were admitted to the operating block. Angiomas were surgically individualized. Some of them were actively bleeding. Enterotomy was performed. Postoperative sequelae was marked by the stop of the bleedings. This study aims to update the current understanding of this rare pathology as well as the benefit of surgical treatment in controlling the complications caused by this pathology and in reducing the frequency of transfusions.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.28.102.11109

  10 / 1931132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511602
[Au] Autor:de Lima Pereira A; Southgate R; Ahmed H; O'Connor P; Cramond V; Lenglet A
[Ad] Address:Mdecins Sans Frontires (MSF), Operational Centre Amsterdam (OCA), Koban, Syria.
[Ti] Title:Infectious Disease Risk and Vaccination in Northern Syria after 5 Years of Civil War: The MSF Experience.
[So] Source:PLoS Curr;10, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:2157-3999
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: In 2015, following an influx of population into Koban in northern Syria, Mdecins Sans Frontires (MSF) in collaboration with the Koban Health Administration (KHA) initiated primary healthcare activities. A vaccination coverage survey and vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) risk analysis were undertaken to clarify the VPD risk and vaccination needs. This was followed by a measles Supplementary Immunization Activity (SIA). We describe the methods and results used for this prioritisation activity around vaccination in Koban in 2015. Methods: We implemented a pre-SIA survey in 135 randomly-selected households in Koban using a vaccination history questionnaire for all children <5 years. We conducted a VPD Risk Analysis using MSF 'Preventive Vaccination in Humanitarian Emergencies' guidance to prioritize antigens with the highest public health threat for mass vaccination activities. A Measles SIA was then implemented and followed by vaccine coverage survey in 282 randomly-selected households targeting children <5 years. Results: The pre-SIA survey showed that 168/212 children (79.3%; 95%CI=72.7-84.6%) had received one vaccine or more in their lifetime. Forty-three children (20.3%; 95%CI: 15.1-26.6%) had received all vaccines due by their age; only one was <12 months old and this child had received all vaccinations outside of Syria. The VPD Risk Analysis prioritised measles, Haemophilus Influenza type B (Hib) and Pneumococcus vaccinations. In the measles SIA, 3410 children aged 6-59 months were vaccinated. The use of multiple small vaccination sites to reduce risks associated with crowds in this active conflict setting was noted as a lesson learnt. The post-SIA survey estimated 82% (95%CI: 76.9-85.9%; n=229/280) measles vaccination coverage in children 6-59 months. Discussion: As a result of the conflict in Syria, the progressive collapse of the health care system in Koban has resulted in low vaccine coverage rates, particularly in younger age groups. The repeated displacements of the population, attacks on health institutions and exodus of healthcare workers, challenge the resumption of routine immunization in this conflict setting and limit the use of SIAs to ensure sustainable immunity to VPDs. We have shown that the risk for several VPDs in Koban remains high. Conclusion: We call on all health actors and the international community to work towards re-establishment of routine immunisation activities as a priority to ensure that children who have had no access to vaccination in the last five years are adequately protected for VPDs as soon as possible.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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