Database : MEDLINE
Search on : cochlear and implantation [Words]
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[PMID]: 29236905
[Au] Autor:Santos NPD; Couto MIV; Martinho-Carvalho AC
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Fisioterapia, Fonoaudiologia e Terapia Ocupacional, Faculdade de Medicina - FM, Universidade de São Paulo - USP - São Paulo (SP), Brasil.
[Ti] Title:Nijmegen Cochlear Implantation Questionnaire (NCIQ): tradução, adaptação cultural e aplicação em adultos usuários de implante coclear. Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire (NCIQ): translation, cultural adaptation, and application in adults with cochlear implants.
[So] Source:Codas;29(6):e20170007, 2017 Dec 11.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:por; eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Cross-cultural adaptation and translation of the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire (NCIQ) into Brazilian Portuguese and analysis of quality of life (QoL) results in adults with cochlear implant (CI). METHODS: The NCIQ instrument was translated into Brazilian Portuguese and culturally adapted. After that, a cross-sectional and clinical QoL evaluation was conducted with a group of 24 adults with CI. RESULTS: The questionnaire title in Brazilian Portuguese is 'Questionário Nijmegen de Implantes Cocleares' (NCIQ-P). The version of the NCIQ questionnaire translated into Brazilian Portuguese presented good internal consistency (0.78). The social and physical domains presented the highest scores, with the basic and advanced sound perception subdomains achieving the highest scores. No correlation between gender and time of device use was found for the questionnaire domains and subdomains. CONCLUSION: The cross-cultural adaptation and translation of the NCIQ into Brazilian Portuguese suggests that this instrument is reliable and useful for clinical and research purposes in Brazilian adults with CI.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cochlear Implantation
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Translations
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Brazil
Cochlear Implants
Female
Hearing Loss/diagnosis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Translating
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171214
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522083
[Au] Autor:Eshraghi AA; Nguyen D; Mittal R
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.
[Ti] Title:Can Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Therapy Improve Clinical Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation?
[So] Source:JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:2168-619X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaoto.2017.3414

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[PMID]: 29519690
[Au] Autor:Prevoteau C; Chen SY; Lalwani AK
[Ad] Address:University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rouen, France.
[Ti] Title:Music enjoyment with cochlear implantation.
[So] Source:Auris Nasus Larynx;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1476
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since the advent of cochlear implant (CI) surgery in the 1960s, there have been remarkable technological and surgical advances enabling excellent speech perception in quiet with many CI users able to use the telephone. However, many CI users struggle with music perception, particularly with the pitch-based and melodic elements of music. Yet remarkably, despite poor music perception, many CI users enjoy listening to music based on self-report questionnaires, and prospective studies have suggested a disassociation between music perception and enjoyment. Music enjoyment is arguably a more functional measure of one's listening experience, and thus enhancing one's listening experience is a worthy goal. Recent studies have shown that re-engineering music to reduce its complexity may enhance enjoyment in CI users and also delineate differences in musical preferences from normal hearing listeners.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496363
[Au] Autor:Resnick JM; O'Brien GE; Rubinstein JT
[Ad] Address:Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center, CHDD Clinic Bldg, University of Washington, NE Columbia Rd., Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: resnick@u.washington.edu.
[Ti] Title:Simulated auditory nerve axon demyelination alters sensitivity and response timing to extracellular stimulation.
[So] Source:Hear Res;361:121-137, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5891
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since cochlear implant function involves direct depolarization of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) by applied current, SGN physiological health must be an important factor in cochlear implant (CI) outcomes. This expected relationship has, however, been difficult to confirm in implant recipients. Suggestively, animal studies have demonstrated both acute and progressive SGN ultrastructural changes (notably axon demyelination), even in the absence of soma death, and corresponding altered physiology following sensorineural deafening. Whether such demyelination occurs in humans and how such changes might impact CI function remains unknown. To approach this problem, we incorporated SGN demyelination into a biophysical model of extracellular stimulation of SGN fibers. Our approach enabled exploration of the entire parameter space corresponding to simulated myelin diameter and extent of fiber affected. All simulated fibers were stimulated distally with anodic monophasic, cathodic monophasic, anode-phase-first (AF) biphasic, and cathode-phase-first (CF) biphasic pulses from an extracellular disc electrode and monitored for spikes centrally. Not surprisingly, axon sensitivity generally decreased with demyelination, resulting in elevated thresholds, however, this effect was strongly non-uniform. Fibers with severe demyelination affecting only the most peripheral nodes responded nearly identically to normally myelinated fibers. Additionally, partial demyelination (<50%) yielded only minimal increases in threshold even when the entire fiber was impacted. The temporal effects of demyelination were more unexpected. Both latency and jitter of responses demonstrated resilience to modest changes but exhibited strongly non-monotonic and stimulus-dependent relationships to more profound demyelination. Normal, and modestly demyelinated fibers, were more sensitive to cathodic than anodic monophasic pulses and to CF than AF biphasic pulses, however, when demyelination was more severe these relative sensitivities were reversed. Comparison of threshold crossing between nodal segments demonstrated stimulus-dependent shifts in action potential initiation with different fiber demyelination states. For some demyelination scenarios, both phases of biphasic pulses could initiate action potentials at threshold resulting in bimodal latency and initiation site distributions and dramatically increased jitter. In summary, simulated demyelination leads to complex changes in fiber sensitivity and spike timing, mediated by alterations in action potential initiation site and slowed action potential conduction due to non-uniformities in the electrical properties of axons. Such demyelination-induced changes, if present in implantees, would have profound implications for the detection of fine temporal cues but not disrupt cues on the time scale of speech envelopes. These simulation results highlight the importance of exploring the SGN ultrastructural changes caused by a given etiology of hearing loss to more accurately predict cochlear implantation outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480360
[Au] Autor:Garcia-Iza L; Martinez Z; Ugarte A; Fernandez M; Altuna X
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Donostia University Hospital, Donostia-San Sebastian, Spain. leire.garcia.iza@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Cochlear implantation in the elderly: outcomes, long-term evolution, and predictive factors.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(4):913-922, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Our goal in this study is to find out the outcomes of cochlear implantation in elderly (> 60 years) and check if this improvement is similar to that of their younger counterparts in short- and long-term evolution. In addition, we have attempted to ascertain the predictive factors that might affect the verbal comprehension results of older patients. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Ninety-four patients older than 40 years, divided into two groups. 40-60 years n = 55 and > 60 years n = 39. A pure-tone audiometry, a disyllabic word test, and the test of phonetically balanced sentences of Navarra were made in silence to each patient. These measurements were made pre-implantation and 1, 5, and 10 year post-implantation. Peri- and postoperative complications were registered. The hypothetic predictive factors of post-implanted performance were evaluated in the elderly. RESULTS: Our study shows no significant difference between young and old adult´s outcomes in short- and long-term evolutions, nor in the complication rate. Furthermore, we proved the significant influence of the side of implantation, use of hearing aids, and duration of hearing loss in the short- and long-term results in the elderly. CONCLUSION: This study shows that cochlear implantation in the elderly is as safe, useful, and worthwhile as in young adults. Age has a low influence in cochlear implant outcomes; however, we have found the significant influence of the side of implantation, the use of hearing aids, and the duration of hearing loss in the short- and long-term results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4910-y

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[PMID]: 29417275
[Au] Autor:Stuermer KJ; Schwarz D; Anagiotos A; Lang-Roth R; Hüttenbrink KB; Luers JC
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937, Cologne, Germany. konrad.stuermer@uk-koeln.de.
[Ti] Title:Cochlear implantation using the underwater technique: long-term results.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;275(4):875-881, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The opening of the round window and the insertion of the electrode array into the scala tympani during cochlear implant surgery can lead to a pressure shock of the delicate inner ear structures. By filling the tympanic cavity with Ringer Solution during these surgical steps (underwater technique), the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid acts as a smooth pressure stabilizer, avoiding a pressure shock of the inner ear structures. The aim of this retrospective study was to present long-term results of this new method of cochlear implantation in underwater technique. METHODS: Altogether, 47 implantations in 43 patients with residual hearing at the frequencies 250, 500 and 1000 Hz in the unaided preoperative pure tone audiometry were included. A cochlear implantation via round window with a conventional full-length electrode was performed in underwater technique. Changes of residual hearing 7 weeks and 24 months after surgery were analyzed. RESULTS: Overall postimplant hearing preservation 7 weeks after implantation was achieved in 22 ears (47%). Subsequent follow-up was performed on average 24 months after surgery (range 12 months-4.2 years) in all patients. At this late postoperative evaluation, preservation of hearing was recorded in 18 ears (38%). Neither the follow-up time nor the type of electrode had a significant impact on the postoperative hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The underwater technique is an atraumatic cochlear implantation technique with hearing preservation rates comparable to results in literature and a very small hearing preservation decline rate over time even when using full-length CI electrodes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4886-7

  7 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514199
[Au] Autor:Scharp KM; Barker BA; Rucker SN; Jones HD
[Ad] Address:Utah State University, Department of Languages, Philosophy, and Communication Studies, Logan, UT 84322.
[Ti] Title:Exploring the Identities of Hearing Parents who Chose Cochlear Implantation for their Children with Hearing Loss.
[So] Source:J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1465-7325
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We aimed to determine the types of identities hearing parents construct when telling online stories about their children with hearing loss (HL) who use cochlear implants (CIs). To do so, we employed a qualitative design and sampled 20 different blogs United States origins and written by parents of children who use CIs. We then used thematic narrative analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006; Riessman, C. K. (2008). Narrative methods for the human sciences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.) to uncover recurring themes from these parents' blogs. The themes then allowed us to assign identities to the parents. Four identities emerged in the parents' stories: (1) advocates, (2) resilient parents, (3) obedient worriers, and (4) matter-of-fact narrators. Identifying and understanding these parent identities is a first step toward improving theoretical and clinical insights into parents' perspectives and experiences following their children's diagnosis of HL. Such insights could ultimately improve audiologists' abilities to help families seek out, implement, and follow-through with family-centered hearing healthcare.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/deafed/enx060

  8 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513262
[Au] Autor:Erhardt J; Fuhrer E; Gruschke OG; Leupold J; Wapler MC; Hennig J; Stieglitz T; Korvink JG
[Ad] Address:University of Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 102, Freiburg, 79110, GERMANY.
[Ti] Title:Should patients with brain implants undergo MRI?
[So] Source:J Neural Eng;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1741-2552
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Patients suffering from neuronal degenerative diseases are increasingly being equipped with neural implants to treat symptoms or restore functions and increase their quality of life. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) would be the modality of choice for diagnosis and compulsory post-operative monitoring of such patients. However, interactions between the MR environment and implants pose severe health risks to the patient. Nevertheless, neural implant recipients regularly underwent MRI examinations, and adverse events were reported rarely. This should not imply that the procedures are safe. More than 300.000 cochlear implant recipients are excluded from MRI unless the indication outweighs excruciating pain. For 75.000 DBS recipients quite the opposite holds: MRI is considered essential part of the implantation procedure and some medical centres deliberately exceed safety regulations which they referred to as crucially impractical. MRI related permanent neurological dysfunctions in DBS recipients have occurred in the past when manufacturer recommendations were exceeded. Within the last decades extensive effort has been invested to identify, characterise, and quantify the occurring interactions. Today we are far from a satisfying solution to achieve a safe and beneficial MR procedure for all implant recipients. To contribute, we intend to raise awareness of a growing concern and want to summon the community to stop absurdities and instead improve the situation for the increasing number of patients. Therefore, we review implant safety in the MRI literature from an engineering point of view, with a focus on cochlear and DBS implants as success stories in clinical practice. We briefly explain fundamental phenomena which can lead to patient harm, and point out breakthroughs and errors made. We end with conclusions and strategies to avoid future implants from being contraindicated to MR examinations. We believe that implant recipients should enter MRI, but before doing so, we should make sure that the procedure is reasonable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1088/1741-2552/aab4e4

  9 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29283914
[Au] Autor:Plontke SK; Kösling S; Rahne T
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery.
[Ti] Title:Cochlear Implantation After Partial or Subtotal Cochleoectomy for Intracochlear Schwannoma Removal-A Technical Report.
[So] Source:Otol Neurotol;39(3):365-371, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1537-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To describe the technique for surgical tumor removal, cochlear implant (CI) electrode placement and reconstruction of the surgical defect in patients with intracochlear schwannomas. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Ten patients (five men, five women, mean age 48 ±â€Š12 yr) with profound or severe to profound hearing loss due to intralabyrinthine schwannomas with intracochlear location. INTERVENTIONS: Surgical tumor removal through extended round window approach, partial or subtotal cochleoectomy with or without labyrinthectomy and reconstruction of the surgical defect with cartilage, perichondrium or temporal muscle fascia, and bone pâté. Eight patients received a cochlear implant in the same procedure. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Retrospective evaluation of clinical outcome including safety aspects (adverse events) and audiological performance at early follow up in cases of cochlear implantation. RESULTS: The tumor was successfully removed in all cases without macroscopic (operation microscope and endoscope) tumor remnants in the bony labyrinth apart from one case with initial transmodiolar growth. One patient needed revision surgery for labyrinthine fistula. At short-term follow up (3-month post-surgery), good hearing results with the cochlear implant were obtained in all but one patient with a word recognition score of 100% for numbers, and 64 ±â€Š14% for monosyllables (at 65 dB SPL in quiet). CONCLUSIONS: Surgical tumor removal and cochlear implantation is a promising treatment strategy in the management of intralabyrinthine schwannoma with intracochlear location, further extending the indication range for cochlear implantation. It is, however, of importance to observe the long-term outcome in these patients and to address challenges like follow up with magnetic resonance imaging.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MAO.0000000000001696

  10 / 8320 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29283913
[Au] Autor:Korsager LEH; Schmidt JH; Faber C; Wanscher JH
[Ad] Address:Department of ENT Head & Neck Surgery.
[Ti] Title:Vestibular Outcome After Cochlear Implantation Is Not Related to Surgical Technique: A Double Blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial of Round Window Approach Versus Cochleostomy.
[So] Source:Otol Neurotol;39(3):306-312, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1537-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To establish whether the round window approach (RWA) leads to less vestibular dysfunction and dizziness than the standard cochleostomy approach (SCA) during cochlear implant (CI) surgery, as assessed using the video head impulse test (vHIT).Additionally, objective findings were compared with the subjective dizziness perceived by the patient. STUDY DESIGN: Double blinded, clinical randomized trial. SETTING: University Hospital. PATIENTS: Fifty-two ears from 46 patients were included. Inclusion criterion was a gain value more than 0.50. INTERVENTION: Patients were randomized to the RWA or the SCA. Evaluation with the vHIT was performed before surgery, 1 day after surgery, and 1 month after surgery. Subjective dizziness was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gain values and the incidence of catch-up saccades. RESULTS: Three out of 23 patients in the SCA group experienced catch-up saccades compared with no patients in the RWA group, indicating the occurrence of objective vestibular dysfunction after CI surgery; the difference was not statistically significant. The VAS increased in both groups the day after surgery. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant. No statistically significant changes in the gain value or the DHI score could were observed between the two groups. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference between the cochleostomy approach and the round window approach using the vHIT and subjective dizziness perceived by the patient was found.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MAO.0000000000001695


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