Database : MEDLINE
Search on : cochlear and nerve [Words]
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[PMID]: 29298868
[Au] Autor:Marks KL; Martel DT; Wu C; Basura GJ; Roberts LE; Schvartz-Leyzac KC; Shore SE
[Ad] Address:Kresge Hearing Research Institute, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
[Ti] Title:Auditory-somatosensory bimodal stimulation desynchronizes brain circuitry to reduce tinnitus in guinea pigs and humans.
[So] Source:Sci Transl Med;10(422), 2018 Jan 03.
[Is] ISSN:1946-6242
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The dorsal cochlear nucleus is the first site of multisensory convergence in mammalian auditory pathways. Principal output neurons, the fusiform cells, integrate auditory nerve inputs from the cochlea with somatosensory inputs from the head and neck. In previous work, we developed a guinea pig model of tinnitus induced by noise exposure and showed that the fusiform cells in these animals exhibited increased spontaneous activity and cross-unit synchrony, which are physiological correlates of tinnitus. We delivered repeated bimodal auditory-somatosensory stimulation to the dorsal cochlear nucleus of guinea pigs with tinnitus, choosing a stimulus interval known to induce long-term depression (LTD). Twenty minutes per day of LTD-inducing bimodal (but not unimodal) stimulation reduced physiological and behavioral evidence of tinnitus in the guinea pigs after 25 days. Next, we applied the same bimodal treatment to 20 human subjects with tinnitus using a double-blinded, sham-controlled, crossover study. Twenty-eight days of LTD-inducing bimodal stimulation reduced tinnitus loudness and intrusiveness. Unimodal auditory stimulation did not deliver either benefit. Bimodal auditory-somatosensory stimulation that induces LTD in the dorsal cochlear nucleus may hold promise for suppressing chronic tinnitus, which reduces quality of life for millions of tinnitus sufferers worldwide.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496363
[Au] Autor:Resnick JM; O'Brien GE; Rubinstein JT
[Ad] Address:Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center, CHDD Clinic Bldg, University of Washington, NE Columbia Rd., Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: resnick@u.washington.edu.
[Ti] Title:Simulated auditory nerve axon demyelination alters sensitivity and response timing to extracellular stimulation.
[So] Source:Hear Res;361:121-137, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5891
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Since cochlear implant function involves direct depolarization of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) by applied current, SGN physiological health must be an important factor in cochlear implant (CI) outcomes. This expected relationship has, however, been difficult to confirm in implant recipients. Suggestively, animal studies have demonstrated both acute and progressive SGN ultrastructural changes (notably axon demyelination), even in the absence of soma death, and corresponding altered physiology following sensorineural deafening. Whether such demyelination occurs in humans and how such changes might impact CI function remains unknown. To approach this problem, we incorporated SGN demyelination into a biophysical model of extracellular stimulation of SGN fibers. Our approach enabled exploration of the entire parameter space corresponding to simulated myelin diameter and extent of fiber affected. All simulated fibers were stimulated distally with anodic monophasic, cathodic monophasic, anode-phase-first (AF) biphasic, and cathode-phase-first (CF) biphasic pulses from an extracellular disc electrode and monitored for spikes centrally. Not surprisingly, axon sensitivity generally decreased with demyelination, resulting in elevated thresholds, however, this effect was strongly non-uniform. Fibers with severe demyelination affecting only the most peripheral nodes responded nearly identically to normally myelinated fibers. Additionally, partial demyelination (<50%) yielded only minimal increases in threshold even when the entire fiber was impacted. The temporal effects of demyelination were more unexpected. Both latency and jitter of responses demonstrated resilience to modest changes but exhibited strongly non-monotonic and stimulus-dependent relationships to more profound demyelination. Normal, and modestly demyelinated fibers, were more sensitive to cathodic than anodic monophasic pulses and to CF than AF biphasic pulses, however, when demyelination was more severe these relative sensitivities were reversed. Comparison of threshold crossing between nodal segments demonstrated stimulus-dependent shifts in action potential initiation with different fiber demyelination states. For some demyelination scenarios, both phases of biphasic pulses could initiate action potentials at threshold resulting in bimodal latency and initiation site distributions and dramatically increased jitter. In summary, simulated demyelination leads to complex changes in fiber sensitivity and spike timing, mediated by alterations in action potential initiation site and slowed action potential conduction due to non-uniformities in the electrical properties of axons. Such demyelination-induced changes, if present in implantees, would have profound implications for the detection of fine temporal cues but not disrupt cues on the time scale of speech envelopes. These simulation results highlight the importance of exploring the SGN ultrastructural changes caused by a given etiology of hearing loss to more accurately predict cochlear implantation outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29477697
[Au] Autor:Mulders WHAM; Chin IL; Robertson D
[Ad] Address:The Auditory Laboratory, School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 Australia; Ear Science Institute Australia, 1/1 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia, 6008, Australia. Electronic address: helmy.mulders@uwa.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Persistent hair cell malfunction contributes to hidden hearing loss.
[So] Source:Hear Res;361:45-51, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5891
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Noise exposures that result in fully reversible changes in cochlear neural threshold can cause a reduced neural output at supra-threshold sound intensity. This so-called "hidden hearing loss" has been shown to be associated with selective degeneration of high threshold afferent nerve fiber-inner hair cell (IHC) synapses. However, the electrophysiological function of the IHCs themselves in hidden hearing loss has not been directly investigated. We have made round window (RW) measurements of cochlear action potentials (CAP) and summating potentials (SP) after two levels of a 10 kHz acoustic trauma. The more intense acoustic trauma lead to notch-like permanent threshold changes and both CAP and SP showed reductions in supra-threshold amplitudes at frequencies with altered thresholds as well as from fully recovered regions. However, the interpretation of the results in normal threshold regions was complicated by the likelihood of reduced contributions from adjacent regions with elevated thresholds. The milder trauma showed full recovery of all neural thresholds, but there was a persistent depression of the amplitudes of both CAP and SP in response to supra-threshold sounds. The effect on SP amplitude in particular shows that occult damage to hair cell transduction mechanisms can contribute to hidden hearing loss. Such damage could potentially affect the supra-threshold output properties of surviving primary afferent neurons.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29253291
[Au] Autor:Mazzoni A; Zanoletti E; Denaro L; Martini A; Avella D
[Ad] Address:Otolaryngology Department, Neurosciences Department, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Retrolabyrinthine Meatotomy as Part of Retrosigmoid Approach to Expose the Whole Internal Auditory Canal: Rationale, Technique, and Outcome in Hearing Preservation Surgery for Vestibular Schwannoma.
[So] Source:Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown);14(1):36-44, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:2332-4260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannoma extending to the fundus of the internal auditory canal is currently considered an unfavorable condition for hearing preservation surgery via a retrosigmoid approach because the lateral end of the canal is hard to view directly during microsurgery. OBJECTIVE: To present an improved retrolabyrinthine meatotomy (RLM) technique that enables the full length of the cochlear and facial nerves to be inspected up to their orifices on the fundus. Long-term results are briefly reported. METHODS: A consecutive series of 100 cases with various degrees of fundus involvement underwent surgery via a retrosigmoid approach and RLM. The follow-up ranged from 4 to 14 yr. Outcomes on hearing and facial nerve function were recorded, and preoperative MRI findings of the tumor on the fundus were correlated with the surgical findings and the long-term radicality of the tumor resection. RESULTS: Residual tumor on the fundus was identified in 3 cases, all belonging to the group with tumors adhering to the fundus. The functional results were in line with the best reported outcomes of this surgery. CONCLUSION: RLM via a retrosigmoid approach seemed adequate for the purposes of hearing preservation surgery and enabled the full course of the facial and cochlear nerves through the internal auditory canal to be exposed to direct view. Tumors adhering to the vestibular quadrant of the fundus were more difficult to remove, and there were a few cases of local residual tumor.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ons/opx091

  5 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29348575
[Au] Autor:Neef J; Urban NT; Ohn TL; Frank T; Jean P; Hell SW; Willig KI; Moser T
[Ad] Address:Institute for Auditory Neuroscience and InnerEarLab, University Medical Center Göttingen, 37099, Göttingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Quantitative optical nanophysiology of Ca signaling at inner hair cell active zones.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):290, 2018 01 18.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ca influx triggers the release of synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic active zone (AZ). A quantitative characterization of presynaptic Ca signaling is critical for understanding synaptic transmission. However, this has remained challenging to establish at the required resolution. Here, we employ confocal and stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy to quantify the number (20-330) and arrangement (mostly linear 70 nm × 100-600 nm clusters) of Ca channels at AZs of mouse cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs). Establishing STED Ca imaging, we analyze presynaptic Ca signals at the nanometer scale and find confined elongated Ca domains at normal IHC AZs, whereas Ca domains are spatially spread out at the AZs of bassoon-deficient IHCs. Performing 2D-STED fluorescence lifetime analysis, we arrive at estimates of the Ca concentrations at stimulated IHC AZs of on average 25 µM. We propose that IHCs form bassoon-dependent presynaptic Ca -channel clusters of similar density but scalable length, thereby varying the number of Ca channels amongst individual AZs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Calcium Signaling/physiology
Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner/physiology
Microscopy/methods
Nanotechnology/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Algorithms
Animals
Calcium/metabolism
Calcium Channels, L-Type/physiology
Hair Cells, Auditory, Inner/metabolism
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Mice, Knockout
Microscopy, Confocal
Models, Neurological
Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics
Nerve Tissue Proteins/physiology
Synapses/metabolism
Synapses/physiology
Synaptic Transmission/genetics
Synaptic Transmission/physiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bsn protein, mouse); 0 (Calcium Channels, L-Type); 0 (Nerve Tissue Proteins); SY7Q814VUP (Calcium)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02612-y

  6 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29348376
[Au] Autor:Sato K; Ohi T; Shozaki T; Kariya S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Ajirogikai Uji Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[Benign Outcome of Cochlear Implantation in a Patient with Superficial Siderosis].
[So] Source:Brain Nerve;70(1):73-80, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1881-6096
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:We report the case of a 38-year-old man with gait disorder and hearing loss. The patient had developed gait disorder due to a cervical meningioma since 4 year-old disappeared for 15 years after the surgical removal of the meningioma. However, at the age of 21 year-old, the gait disorder reappeared and worsened progressively. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and epileptic seizures developed during the disease course, and he was diagnosed with superficial siderosis (SS). When he was 37 years old, he experienced sudden-onset of right-side hearing impairment and was considered a candidate for cochlear implantation (CI) at the otorhinolaryngology clinic of the nearby University Hospital. He underwent CI in November 2014. Eight months after the operation, his right side hearing improved although ataxia, hearing loss, and pyramidal sign persisted. At the long term follow-up of 29 months after CI, his hearing remained at the improved level. Thus, CI may be an effective long-term treatment for SNHL in patients with SS and could prevent the progression of his hearing loss. (Received February 1, 2017; Accepted August 23, 2017; Published January 1, 2018).
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11477/mf.1416200952

  7 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29187555
[Au] Autor:Harris KC; Vaden KI; McClaskey CM; Dias JW; Dubno JR
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina , Charleston, South Carolina.
[Ti] Title:Complementary metrics of human auditory nerve function derived from compound action potentials.
[So] Source:J Neurophysiol;119(3):1019-1028, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1522-1598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Declines in auditory nerve (AN) function contribute to suprathreshold auditory processing and communication deficits in individuals with normal hearing, hearing loss, hyperacusis, and tinnitus. Procedures to characterize AN loss or dysfunction in humans are limited. We report several novel complementary metrics using the compound action potential (CAP), a direct measure of summated AN activity. Together, these metrics may be used to characterize AN function noninvasively in humans. We examined how these metrics change with stimulus intensity and interpreted these changes within a framework of known physiological properties of the basilar membrane and AN. Our results reveal how neural synchrony and the recruitment of AN fibers with longer first-spike latencies likely contribute to the CAP, affect auditory processing, and differ with noise exposure history in younger adults with normal pure-tone thresholds. Moving forward, this new battery of metrics provides a crucial step toward new diagnostics of AN function in humans. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Loss or inactivity of auditory nerve (AN) fibers is thought to contribute to suprathreshold auditory processing deficits, but evidence-based methods to assess these effects are not available. We describe several novel metrics that together may be used to quantify neural synchrony and characterize AN function in humans.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1152/jn.00638.2017

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[PMID]: 29502727
[Au] Autor:Eshraghi AA; Ila K; Ocak E; Telischi FF
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 Northwest 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136, USA. Electronic address: aeshraghi@med.miami.edu.
[Ti] Title:Advanced Otosclerosis: Stapes Surgery or Cochlear Implantation?
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Clin North Am;51(2):429-440, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1557-8259
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diagnosis and treatment of advanced otosclerosis can be controversial. In 1961, House and Sheehy defined advanced otosclerosis as hearing loss in air conduction threshold by 85 dB with nonmeasurable bone conduction. Recently, the definition of advanced otosclerosis is mostly based on the decrease of speech recognition. There are some treatment modalities: stapes surgery and hearing aids, cochlear implantation, or direct acoustic cochlear implant. The authors propose a new algorithm for treatment. If the patient is treated with cochlear implantation, the surgeon should be cautious for facial nerve stimulation after surgery because it is the most prevalent complication.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498575
[Au] Autor:Frischer JM; Gruber E; Schöffmann V; Ertl A; Höftberger R; Mallouhi A; Wolfsberger S; Arnoldner C; Eisner W; Knosp E; Kitz K; Gatterbauer B
[Ad] Address:Departments of 1 Neurosurgery.
[Ti] Title:Long-term outcome after Gamma Knife radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma of all Koos grades: a single-center study.
[So] Source:J Neurosurg;:1-10, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1933-0693
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE The authors present long-term follow-up data on patients treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for acoustic neuroma. METHODS Six hundred eighteen patients were radiosurgically treated for acoustic neuroma between 1992 and 2016 at the Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna. Patients with neurofibromatosis and patients treated too recently to attain 1 year of follow-up were excluded from this retrospective study. Thus, data on 557 patients with spontaneous acoustic neuroma of any Koos grade are presented, as are long-term follow-up data on 426 patients with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Patients were assessed according to the Gardner-Robertson (GR) hearing scale and the House-Brackmann facial nerve function scale, both prior to GKRS and at the times of follow-up. RESULTS Four hundred fifty-two patients (81%) were treated with radiosurgery alone and 105 patients (19%) with combined microsurgery-radiosurgery. While the combined treatment was especially favored before 2002, the percentage of cases treated with radiosurgery alone has significantly increased since then. The overall complication rate after GKRS was low and has declined significantly in the last decade. The risk of developing hydrocephalus after GKRS increased with tumor size. One case (0.2%) of malignant transformation after GKRS was diagnosed. Radiological tumor control rates of 92%, 91%, and 91% at 5, 10, and 15 years after GKRS, regardless of the Koos grade or pretreatment, were observed. The overall tumor control rate without the need for additional treatment was even higher at 98%. At the last follow-up, functional hearing was preserved in 55% of patients who had been classified with GR hearing class I or II prior to GKRS. Hearing preservation rates of 53%, 34%, and 34% at 5, 10, and 15 years after GKRS were observed. The multivariate regression model revealed that the GR hearing class prior to GKRS and the median dose to the cochlea were independent predictors of the GR class at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS In small to medium-sized spontaneous acoustic neuromas, radiosurgery should be recognized as the primary treatment at an early stage. Although minimizing the cochlear dose seems beneficial for hearing preservation, the authors, like others before, do not recommend undertreating intracanalicular tumors in favor of low cochlear doses. For larger acoustic neuromas, radiosurgery remains a reliable management option with tumor control rates similar to those for smaller acoustic neuromas; however, careful patient selection and counseling are recommended given the higher risk of side effects. Microsurgery must be considered in acoustic neuromas with significant brainstem compression or hydrocephalus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3171/2017.8.JNS171281

  10 / 14001 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29496369
[Au] Autor:Amaral MSAD; Reis ACMB; Massuda ET; Hyppolito MA
[Ad] Address:Pós Graduação. Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Hospital das Clínicas - Divisão de Otorrinolaringologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: stella_arantes@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.
[So] Source:Braz J Otorhinolaryngol;, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1808-8686
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. OBJECTIVE: To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. METHODS: A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. CONCLUSION: The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:Publisher


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