Database : MEDLINE
Search on : cracked and tooth and syndrome [Words]
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[PMID]: 28624073
[Au] Autor:Chen M; Fu K; Qiao F; Zhang X; Fan Y; Wang L; Li P; Wu Z; Wu L
[Ti] Title:Predicting extension of cracks to the root from the dimensions in the crown: A preliminary in vitro study.
[So] Source:J Am Dent Assoc;148(10):737-742, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors investigated whether extension of a tooth crack into the root can be predicted by the appearance of the crack in the crown in vitro. METHODS: The authors obtained 22 cracked teeth from 22 patients who underwent extraction, and they scanned the teeth using microcomputed tomography. The length and width of the crack on the occlusal surface (LOS and WOS, respectively) and the length of the crack on the proximal surface (LCPS) were measured on 3-dimensional reconstruction images. The pulp chamber roof was penetrated and removed. A crack line visible under the microscope only on the access cavity wall rather than extending to the bottom of the pulp chamber was termed a "nonroot crack." A crack seen at the bottom of the pulp chamber or root wall was termed a "root crack." The authors analyzed the data using Pearson correlation coefficients and receiver operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation between the LOS and LCPS (correlation coefficient, 0.782; P < .001) and between the WOS and LCPS (correlation coefficient, 0.651; P < .05). The LCPS increased by 1.195 millimeters for every 1-mm increase in the LOS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.659 to 1.000) for LOS and 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.557 to 0.964) for WOS. CONCLUSIONS: The extent of a crown crack may indicate how far the crack extends to the root. Both the LOS and WOS may be valuable for assessing whether a crack involves the root, although the LOS seems to be more useful. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The dimensions of a crack in a crown provide a helpful approach for predicting the depth of the crack and its likely prognosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170929
[Lr] Last revision date:170929
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 28496251
[Au] Autor:Banerji S; Mehta SB; Millar BJ
[Ti] Title:The management of cracked tooth syndrome in dental practice.
[So] Source:Br Dent J;222(9):659-666, 2017 May 12.
[Is] ISSN:1476-5373
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cracked tooth syndrome is a commonly encountered condition in dental practice which frequently causes diagnostic and management challenges. This paper provides an overview of the diagnosis of this condition and goes on to discuss current short and long-term management strategies applicable to dental practitioners. This paper also covers the diagnosis and management of this common condition and aims to inform clinicians of the current thinking, as well as to provide an overview of the techniques commonly used in managing cracked tooth syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170514
[Lr] Last revision date:170514
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/sj.bdj.2017.398

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[PMID]: 28261523
[Au] Autor:Kim JM; Kang SR; Yi WJ
[Ad] Address:Dental Research Institute, Seoul National University School of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea .
[Ti] Title:Automatic detection of tooth cracks in optical coherence tomography images.
[So] Source:J Periodontal Implant Sci;47(1):41-50, 2017 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2093-2278
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The aims of the present study were to compare the image quality and visibility of tooth cracks between conventional methods and swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and to develop an automatic detection technique for tooth cracks by SS-OCT imaging. METHODS: We evaluated SS-OCT with a near-infrared wavelength centered at 1,310 nm over a spectral bandwidth of 100 nm at a rate of 50 kHz as a new diagnostic tool for the detection of tooth cracks. The reliability of the SS-OCT images was verified by comparing the crack lines with those detected using conventional methods. After performing preprocessing of the obtained SS-OCT images to emphasize cracks, an algorithm was developed and verified to detect tooth cracks automatically. RESULTS: The detection capability of SS-OCT was superior or comparable to that of trans-illumination, which did not discriminate among the cracks according to depth. Other conventional methods for the detection of tooth cracks did not sense initial cracks with a width of less than 100 µm. However, SS-OCT detected cracks of all sizes, ranging from craze lines to split teeth, and the crack lines were automatically detected in images using the Hough transform. CONCLUSIONS: We were able to distinguish structural cracks, craze lines, and split lines in tooth cracks using SS-OCT images, and to automatically detect the position of various cracks in the OCT images. Therefore, the detection capability of SS-OCT images provides a useful diagnostic tool for cracked tooth syndrome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170816
[Lr] Last revision date:170816
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5051/jpis.2017.47.1.41

  4 / 222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28168240
[Au] Autor:Noma N; Shimizu K; Watanabe K; Young A; Imamura Y; Khan J
[Ti] Title:Cracked tooth syndrome mimicking trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia: A report of four cases.
[So] Source:Quintessence Int;48(4):329-337, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1936-7163
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This report describes four cases of cracked tooth syndrome secondary to traumatic occlusion that mimicked trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. All patients were referred by general practitioners to the Orofacial Pain Clinic at Nihon University Dental School for assessment of atypical facial pain. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Case 1: A 51-year-old woman presented with severe pain in the maxillary and mandibular left molars. Case 2: A 47-year-old woman presented with sharp, shooting pain in the maxillary left molars, which radiated to the temple and periorbital region. Case 3: A 49-year-old man presented with sharp, shooting, and stabbing pain in the maxillary left molars. Case 4: A 38-year-old man presented with intense facial pain in the left supraorbital and infraorbital areas, which radiated to the temporoparietal and maxillary regions. All cases mimicked trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, a group of primary headache disorders characterized by unilateral facial pain and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features. Pulpal necrosis, when caused by cracked tooth syndrome, can manifest with pain frequencies and durations that are unusual for pulpitis, as was seen in these cases. CONCLUSION: Although challenging, differentiation of cracked tooth syndrome from trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias is a necessary skill for dentists.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170324
[Lr] Last revision date:170324
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3290/j.qi.a37688

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[PMID]: 27872333
[Au] Autor:Segarra MS; Shimada Y; Sadr A; Sumi Y; Tagami J
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Three-Dimensional Analysis of Enamel Crack Behavior Using Optical Coherence Tomography.
[So] Source:J Dent Res;96(3):308-314, 2017 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1544-0591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to nondestructively analyze enamel crack behavior on different areas of teeth using 3D swept source-optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). Ten freshly extracted human teeth of each type on each arch ( n = 80 teeth) were inspected for enamel crack patterns on functional, contact and nonfunctional, or noncontact areas using 3D SS-OCT. The predominant crack pattern for each location on each specimen was noted and analyzed. The OCT observations were validated by direct observations of sectioned specimens under confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Cracks appeared as bright lines with SS-OCT, with 3 crack patterns identified: Type I - superficial horizontal cracks; Type II - vertically (occluso-gingival) oriented cracks; and Type III - hybrid or complicated cracks, a combination of a Type I and Type III cracks, which may or may not be confluent with each other. Type II cracks were predominant on noncontacting surfaces of incisors and canines and nonfunctional cusps of posterior teeth. Type I and III cracks were predominant on the contacting surfaces of incisors, cusps of canines, and functional cusps of posterior teeth. Cracks originating from the dental-enamel junction and enamel tufts, crack deflections, and the initiation of new cracks within the enamel (internal cracks) were observed as bright areas. CLSM observations corroborated the SS-OCT findings. We found that crack pattern, tooth type, and the location of the crack on the tooth exhibited a strong correlation. We show that the use of 3D SS-OCT permits for the nondestructive 3D imaging and analysis of enamel crack behavior in whole human teeth in vitro. 3D SS-OCT possesses potential for use in clinical studies for the analysis of enamel crack behavior.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dental Enamel/injuries
Imaging, Three-Dimensional
Tomography, Optical Coherence/methods
Tooth Fractures/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cracked Tooth Syndrome/diagnosis
Dental Enamel/pathology
Humans
In Vitro Techniques
Microscopy, Confocal/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170531
[Lr] Last revision date:170531
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161123
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/0022034516680156

  6 / 222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27475507
[Au] Autor:Edens MH; Khaled Y; Napeñas JJ
[Ad] Address:Oral Medicine Residency Program, Department of Oral Medicine, Carolinas Healthcare System, PO Box 32861, Charlotte, NC 28232, USA.
[Ti] Title:Intraoral Pain Disorders.
[So] Source:Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am;28(3):275-88, 2016 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1365
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Those experiencing intraoral pain associated with dental and oral diseases are likely to pursue treatment from medical and dental providers. The causes for intraoral pain include odontogenic, periodontal, oral mucosal, or contiguous hard and soft tissue structures to the oral cavity. Providers should be vigilant when diagnosing these, as they should be among the first in their differential diagnoses to be ruled out. This review provides brief overviews of frequently encountered oral/dental diseases that cause intraoral pain, originating from the teeth, the surrounding mucosa and gingivae, tongue, bone, and salivary glands and their causes, features, diagnosis, and management strategies.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Facial Pain/diagnosis
Facial Pain/etiology
Facial Pain/therapy
Mouth Diseases/complications
Mouth Diseases/diagnosis
Mouth Diseases/therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Diagnosis, Differential
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170821
[Lr] Last revision date:170821
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160801
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 27402200
[Au] Autor:Idiyatullin D; Garwood M; Gaalaas L; Nixdorf DR
[Ad] Address:1 Center for Magnetic Resonance Research and Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
[Ti] Title:Role of MRI for detecting micro cracks in teeth.
[So] Source:Dentomaxillofac Radiol;45(7):20160150, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0250-832X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the limit of tooth crack width visualization by two MRI pulse sequences in comparison with CBCT. METHODS: Two extracted human teeth with known crack locations and dimensions, as determined by reference standard microCT, were selected for experimental imaging. Crack location/dimension and the presence of common dental restorative materials such as amalgam were typical of that found clinically. Experimental imaging consisted of conventional CBCT scans and MRI scans with two pulse sequences including Sweep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) and gradient echo (GRE). CBCT and MR images of extracted teeth were acquired using acquisition parameters identical to those used for in vivo imaging. Experimental and reference standard images were registered and the limit of tooth crack visualization was determined. RESULTS: Collected images indicate that SWIFT could demonstrate cracks with 20-µm width, which is 10 times narrower than the imaging voxel size. Cracks of this size were not visible in GRE images, even with a short echo time of 2.75 ms. The CBCT images were distorted by artefacts owing to close location of metallic restorations. CONCLUSIONS: The successful visualization of cracks with the SWIFT MRI sequence compared with other clinical modalities suggests that SWIFT MRI can effectively detect microcracks in teeth and therefore may have potential to be a non-invasive method for the in vivo detection of cracks in human teeth.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cracked Tooth Syndrome/diagnostic imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Artifacts
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/methods
Dental Amalgam
Feasibility Studies
Fourier Analysis
Humans
Image Enhancement/methods
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/methods
Imaging, Three-Dimensional/methods
X-Ray Microtomography/methods
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:8049-85-2 (Dental Amalgam)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170924
[Lr] Last revision date:170924
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160713
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1259/dmfr.20160150

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[PMID]: 27247808
[Au] Autor:Bansal R; Chowdhary P; Gurtu A; Mehrotra N; Kishore A
[Ad] Address:Department of Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics, Institute of Dental Sciences, Bareilly 243006, India.
[Ti] Title:Splinting of Longitudinal Fracture: An Innovative Approach.
[So] Source:Case Rep Dent;2016:5083874, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:2090-6447
[Cp] Country of publication:Egypt
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trauma may result in craze lines on the enamel surface, one or more fractured cusps of posterior teeth, cracked tooth syndrome, splitting of posterior teeth, and vertical fracture of root. Out of these, management of some fractures is of great challenge and such teeth are generally recommended for extraction. Literature search reveals attempts to manage such fractures by full cast crown, orthodontic wires, and so forth, in which consideration was given to extracoronal splinting only. However, due to advancement in materials and technologies, intracoronal splinting can be achieved as well. In this case report, longitudinal fractures in tooth #27, tooth #37, and tooth #46 had occurred. In #27, fracture line was running mesiodistally involving the pulpal floor resulting in a split tooth. In teeth 37 and 46, fractures of the mesiobuccal cusp and mesiolingual cusp were observed, respectively. They were restored with cast gold inlay and full cast crown, respectively. Longitudinal fracture of 27 was treated with an innovative approach using intracanal reinforced composite with Ribbond, external reinforcement with an orthodontic band, and full cast metal crown to splint the split tooth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1606
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160602
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1155/2016/5083874

  9 / 222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27039532
[Au] Autor:Feuerstein P
[Ti] Title:I Haven't Got Time for the Pain.
[So] Source:Dent Today;35(3):24, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:8750-2186
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Tooth Fractures/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cracked Tooth Syndrome/diagnosis
Fluorescence
Humans
Photography/instrumentation
Transillumination/instrumentation
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1605
[Cu] Class update date: 160404
[Lr] Last revision date:160404
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160405
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 222 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26944835
[Au] Autor:Kang SH; Kim BS; Kim Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Conservative Dentistry, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Cracked Teeth: Distribution, Characteristics, and Survival after Root Canal Treatment.
[So] Source:J Endod;42(4):557-62, 2016 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3554
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to analyze the distribution and characteristic features of cracked teeth and to evaluate the outcome of root canal treatments (RCTs) for cracked teeth. The prognostic factors for tooth survival were investigated. METHODS: Over the 5-year study period, 175 teeth were identified as having cracks. Data were collected regarding the patients' age, sex, tooth type, location and direction of cracks, probing depth, pulp vitality, type of restoration, cavity classification, opposing teeth, and previous endodontic treatment history. Cracked teeth were managed via various treatment methods, and the 2-year survival rate after RCT was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method in which significance was identified using the log-rank test. Possible prognostic factors were investigated using Cox multivariate proportional hazards modeling. RESULTS: One hundred seventy-five teeth were diagnosed with cracks. Most of the patients were aged 50-60 years (32.0%) or over 60 (32.6%). The lower second molar was the most frequently (25.1%) affected tooth. Intact teeth (34.3%) or teeth with class I cavity restorations (32.0%) exhibited a higher incidence of cracks. The 2-year survival rate of 88 cracked teeth after RCT was 90.0%. A probing depth of more than 6 mm was a significant prognostic factor for the survival of cracked teeth restored via RCT. The survival rate of root-filled cracked teeth with a probing depth of more than 6 mm was 74.1%, which is significantly lower than that of teeth with probing depths of less than 6 mm (96.8%) (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Cracks were commonly found in lower second molars and intact teeth. RCT was a reliable treatment for cracked teeth with a 2-year survival rate of 90.0%. Deep probing depths were found to be a significant clinical factor for the survival of cracked teeth treated with RCT.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cracked Tooth Syndrome/epidemiology
Cracked Tooth Syndrome/therapy
Root Canal Therapy/statistics & numerical data
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Cracked Tooth Syndrome/diagnosis
Cracked Tooth Syndrome/etiology
Dental Pulp Cavity/injuries
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Republic of Korea/epidemiology
Root Canal Therapy/adverse effects
Root Canal Therapy/methods
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Tooth Extraction
Tooth Root/injuries
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170726
[Lr] Last revision date:170726
[Js] Journal subset:D
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160306
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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