Database : MEDLINE
Search on : cranial and nerve and injuries [Words]
References found : 9037 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29451668
[Au] Autor:Irugu DVK; Singh A; Ch S; Panuganti A; Acharya A; Varma H; Thota R; Falcioni M; Reddy S
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Comparison between early and delayed facial nerve decompression in traumatic facial nerve paralysis - A retrospective study.
[So] Source:Codas;30(1):e20170063, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2317-1782
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose To study the intraoperative findings in case of early and delayed decompression of facial nerve paralysis and compare their results. Methods Retrospective data analysis of 23 cases of longitudinal temporal bone fracture with House-Brackmann grade V and VI facial nerve paralysis. All cases were thoroughly evaluated and underwent facial nerve decompression through the transmastoid approach. All cases were under regular follow-up till the date of manuscript submission. Results Clinical improvement of the facial nerve function was observed for early vs. delayed facial nerve decompression. In the early decompression group, facial nerve function improved to grade II in eight cases (80%) and grade III in two cases (20%), whereas in the delayed decompression group it improved to grade II in one case (7.70%), grade III in four cases (30.76%), grade IV in seven cases (53.84%), and grade V in one case (7.70%). Conclusions Early decompression of facial nerve provides better results than delayed decompression because it enables early expansion of the nerve.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Facial Nerve Injuries/surgery
Facial Paralysis/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Decompression, Surgical/methods
Facial Nerve Injuries/diagnostic imaging
Facial Paralysis/diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Skull Fractures/physiopathology
Skull Fractures/surgery
Temporal Bone/injuries
Temporal Bone/surgery
Time-to-Treatment
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180217
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 9037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29461741
[Au] Autor:Van Hoecke H; Calus L; Dhooge I
[Ti] Title:Middle ear damages.
[So] Source:B-ENT;Suppl 26(1):173-183, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:1781-782X
[Cp] Country of publication:Belgium
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Middle ear damages. The eardrum and middle ear are often exposed to blunt and penetrating trauma, blasts, thermal or caustic injuries. These injuries may result in tympanic membrane perforation, middle ear haemorrhage, dislocation and fracture of the ossicular chain, perilymphatic fistula and damage to the chorda tympani and/or facial nerve. In case of life-threatening injuries and/or mass casualty incidents, middle ear trauma obviously does not take highest priority. However, middle ear lesions should be suspected and recognized as early as possible. After meticulous history taking, physical examination consists of cranial nerve evaluation, thorough inspection of the outer ear, otoscopy and assessment of hearing and vestibular function. In the majority of cases, traumatic tympanic membrane perforations by penetrating and blunt injuries have a good prognosis with spontaneous resolution. Tympanic membrane perforations from blast trauma, thermal or caustic injuries are less likely to heal spontaneously. Perforations lasting six months after injury warrant surgery. A high resolution CT scan of the temporal bone is required in case of immediate complete facial nerve paralysis and when oval window pathology or perilymphatic fistula is suspected. Early surgical intervention is needed in case of early onset facial nerve paralysis, when there is suspicion of a perilymphatic fistula with persisting or increasing vestibular symptoms or neurosensory hearing loss and in case of vestibular dislocation of the stapes footplate. When ossicular chain damage is suspected, elective tympanoplasty is indicated. As any traumatic tympanic membrane perforation runs the risk of cholesteatoma formation, biannual follow-up during a minimum of two years is recommended.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 9037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29339001
[Au] Autor:Al-Moraissi EA; Louvrier A; Colletti G; Wolford LM; Biglioli F; Ragaey M; Meyer C; Ellis E
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Thamar University, Yemen. Electronic address: dressamalmoraissi@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Does the surgical approach for treating mandibular condylar fractures affect the rate of seventh cranial nerve injuries? A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a new classification for surgical approaches.
[So] Source:J Craniomaxillofac Surg;46(3):398-412, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-4119
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of facial nerve injury (FNI) when performing (ORIF) of mandibular condylar fractures by different surgical approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed that included several databases with specific keywords, a reference search, and a manual search for suitable articles. The inclusion criteria were all clinical trials, with the aim of assessing the rate of facial nerve injuries when (ORIF) of mandibular condylar fractures was performed using different surgical approaches. The main outcome variable was transient facial nerve injury (TFNI) and permanent facial nerve injury (PFNI) according to the fracture levels, namely: condylar head fractures (CHFs), condylar neck fractures (CNFs), and condylar base fractures (CBFs). For studies where there was no delineation between CNFs and CBFs, the fractures were defined as CNFs/CBFs. The dependent variables were the surgical approaches. RESULTS: A total of 3873 patients enrolled in 96 studies were included in this analysis. TFNI rates reported in the literature were as follows: A) For the transoral approach: a) for strictly intraoral 0.72% (1.3 in CNFs and 0% for CBFs); b) for the transbuccal trocar instrumentation 2.7% (4.2% in CNFs and 0% for CBFs); and c) for endoscopically assisted ORIF 4.2% (5% in CNFs, and 4% in CBFs). B) For low submandibular approach 15.3% (26.1% for CNFs, 11.8% for CBFs, and 13.7% for CNFs/CBFs). C) For the high submandibular/angular subparotid approach with masseter transection 0% in CBFs. D) For the high submandibular/angular transmassetric anteroparotid approach 0% (CNFs and CBFs). E) For the transparotid retromandibular approach a) with nerve facial preparation 14.4% (23.9% in CNFs, 11.8% in CBFs and 13.7% for CNFs/CBFs); b) without facial nerve preparation 19% (24.3% for CNFs and 10.5% for CBFs). F) For retromandibular transmassetric anteroparotid approach 3.4% in CNFs/CBFs. G) For retromandibular transmassetric anteroparotid approach with preauricular extension 2.3% for CNFs/CBFs. H) For preauricular approach a) deep subfascial dissection plane 0% in CHFs b) for subfascial approach using traditional preauricular incision 10% (8.5% in CHFs and 11.5% in CNFs). I) For retroauricular approach 3% for CHFs. PFNI rates reported in the literature were as follows: A) for low submandibular approach 2.2%, B) for retromandibular transparotid approach 1.4%; C) for preauricular approach 0.33%; D) for high submandibular approach 0.3%; E) for deep retroparotid approach 1.5%. CONCLUSION: According to published data for CHFs, a retroauricular approach or deep subfascial preauricular approach was the safest to protect the facial nerve. For CNFs, a transmassetric anteroparotid approach with retromandibular and preauricular extension was the safest approach to decrease risk of FNI. For CBFs, high submandibular incisions with either transmassetric anteroparotid approach with retromandibular or transmassetric subparotid approach, followed by intraoral (with or without endoscopic/transbuccal trocar) were the safest approaches with respect to decreased risk of FNI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 9037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29420144
[Au] Autor:Gilbert AL; Chwalisz B; Mallery R
[Ad] Address:a Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology , Massachusetts Eye & Ear, Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA , USA.
[Ti] Title:Complications of Optic Nerve Sheath Fenestration as a Treatment for Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.
[So] Source:Semin Ophthalmol;33(1):36-41, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5205
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There are a number of surgical options for treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) when it is refractory to medical treatment and weight loss. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF) is one of these options. Use of this procedure varies among centers due to experience with the procedure and concern for associated complications that can result in severe loss of vision. This review summarizes the literature concerning post-surgical complications of ONSF for IIH.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Blindness
Decompression, Surgical/adverse effects
Neurosurgical Procedures/adverse effects
Optic Nerve Injuries/etiology
Optic Nerve/surgery
Papilledema/surgery
Pseudotumor Cerebri/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Blindness/epidemiology
Blindness/etiology
Blindness/physiopathology
Humans
Optic Nerve/pathology
Optic Nerve Injuries/diagnosis
Optic Nerve Injuries/physiopathology
Papilledema/diagnosis
Papilledema/etiology
Postoperative Complications
Pseudotumor Cerebri/physiopathology
Pseudotumor Cerebri/surgery
Visual Acuity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180219
[Lr] Last revision date:180219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/08820538.2017.1353810

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[PMID]: 29282507
[Au] Autor:Mattsson P; Frostell A; Björck G; Persson JKE; Hakim R; Zedenius J; Svensson M
[Ad] Address:Division of Clinical CNS Research, Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet R2:02, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. per.mattsson@ki.se.
[Ti] Title:Recovery of Voice After Reconstruction of the Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve and Adjuvant Nimodipine.
[So] Source:World J Surg;42(3):632-638, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-2323
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Transection injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) has been associated with permanent vocal fold palsy, and treatment has been limited to voice therapy or local treatment of vocal folds. Microsurgical repair has been reported to induce a better function. The calcium channel antagonist nimodipine improves functional recovery after experimental nerve injury and also after cranial nerve injury in patients. This study aims to present voice outcome in patients who underwent repair of the RLN and received nimodipine during regeneration. METHODS: From 2002-2016, 19 patients were admitted to our center with complete unilateral injury to the RLN and underwent microsurgical repair of the RLN. After nerve repair, patients received nimodipine for 2-3 months. Laryngoscopy was performed repeatedly up to 14 months postoperatively. The Voice Handicap Index (VHI) was administered, and patients' maximum phonation time (MPT) was recorded during the follow-up. RESULTS: All patients recovered well after surgery, and nimodipine was well tolerated with no dropouts. None of the patients suffered from atrophy of the vocal fold, and some patients even showed a small ab/adduction of the vocal fold on the repaired side with laryngoscopy. During long-term follow-up (>3 years), VHI and MPT normalized, indicating a nearly complete recovery from unilateral RLN injury. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort study, we report the results of the first 19 consecutive cases at our center subjected to reconstruction of the RLN and adjuvant nimodipine treatment. The outcome of the current strategy is encouraging and should be considered after iatrogenic RLN transection injuries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00268-017-4235-9

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[PMID]: 29181992
[Au] Autor:Aldoori J; Mahadevan V; Aldoori M
[Ad] Address:Huddersfield Royal Infirmary , Lindley, Huddersfield , UK.
[Ti] Title:The significance of the pharyngeal veins during carotid endarterectomy: description of an anatomical triangle.
[So] Source:Ann R Coll Surg Engl;100(2):125-128, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1478-7083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Injuries to the hypoglossal and vagus nerves are the most commonly reported injuries during carotid endarterectomy. While unilateral single nerve injury is usually well tolerated, bilateral or combined nerve injuries can pose a serious threat to life. This study aims to increase awareness of the inferior pharyngeal vein, which usually passes posterior to the internal carotid artery but sometimes crosses anterior to it. Injury to either or both hypoglossal and vagus nerves can occur during control of unexpected haemorrhage from the torn and retracted edges of the inferior pharyngeal vein. We recommend careful ligation and division of this vein. In addition, we observed in 9 (17.3%) of the 52 operations that the pharyngeal vein formed a triangle with the vagus and hypoglossal nerves when it passes anterior to the internal carotid artery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Endarterectomy, Carotid/adverse effects
Endarterectomy, Carotid/methods
Pharynx/anatomy & histology
Pharynx/blood supply
Veins/anatomy & histology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Carotid Arteries/anatomy & histology
Carotid Arteries/surgery
Humans
Hypoglossal Nerve Injuries/prevention & control
Vagus Nerve Injuries/prevention & control
Veins/injuries
Veins/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171129
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1308/rcsann.2017.0176

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[PMID]: 29422277
[Au] Autor:Giannopoulos S; Texakalidis P; Jonnalagadda AK; Karasavvidis T; Giannopoulos S; Kokkinidis DG
[Ad] Address:251 HAF and VA Hospital, Athens, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Revascularization of radiation-induced carotid artery stenosis with carotid endarterectomy vs. carotid artery stenting: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Cardiovasc Revasc Med;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1878-0938
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The incidence of carotid artery stenosis after head and neck radiation is anticipated to rise due to the increasing survival of patients with head and neck malignancies. It remains unclear whether carotid artery stenting (CAS) or endarterectomy (CEA) is the best treatment strategy for radiation-induced carotid artery stenosis. MATERIALS & METHODS: This study was performed according to the PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. Eligible studies were identified through a comprehensive search of PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Central until July 20, 2017. A meta-analysis of random effects model was conducted. The I-square statistic was used to assess for heterogeneity. RESULTS: Five studies and 143 patients were included. Periprocedural stroke, myocardial infarction (MI) and death rates were similar between the two revascularization approaches. However, the risk for cranial nerve (CN) injury was higher in the CEA group (OR: 7.09; 95% CI: 1.17-42.88; I = 0%). CEA was associated with lower mortality rates after a mean follow-up of 50 months (OR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09-0.97; I = 0%). No difference was identified in long-term restenosis rates between CEA and CAS. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with radiation-induced carotid artery stenosis can safely undergo both CAS and CEA with similar risks of periprocedural stroke, MI and death. However, patients treated with CEA have a higher risk for periprocedural CN injuries and a lower risk for long-term mortality.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 9037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29356945
[Au] Autor:Chaturvedi A; Chaturvedi A; Stanescu AL; Blickman JG; Meyers SP
[Ad] Address:Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601, Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA. forapeksha@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Mechanical birth-related trauma to the neonate: An imaging perspective.
[So] Source:Insights Imaging;, 2018 Jan 22.
[Is] ISSN:1869-4101
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mechanical birth-related injuries to the neonate are declining in incidence with advances in prenatal diagnosis and care. These injuries, however, continue to represent an important source of morbidity and mortality in the affected patient population. In the United States, these injuries are estimated to occur among 2.6% of births. Although more usual in context of existing feto-maternal risk factors, their occurrence can be unpredictable. While often superficial and temporary, functional and cosmetic sequelae, disability or even death can result as a consequence of birth-related injuries. The Agency for Healthcare research and quality (AHRQ) in the USA has developed, through expert consensus, patient safety indicators which include seven types of birth-related injuries including subdural and intracerebral hemorrhage, epicranial subaponeurotic hemorrhage, skeletal injuries, injuries to spine and spinal cord, peripheral and cranial nerve injuries and other types of specified and non-specified birth trauma. Understandably, birth-related injuries are a source of great concern for the parents and clinician. Many of these injuries have imaging manifestations. This article seeks to familiarize the reader with the clinical spectrum, significance and multimodality imaging appearances of neonatal multi-organ birth-related trauma and its sequelae, where applicable. Teaching points • Mechanical trauma related to birth usually occurs with pre-existing feto-maternal risk factors.• Several organ systems can be affected; neurologic, musculoskeletal or visceral injuries can occur.• Injuries can be mild and transient or disabling, even life-threatening.• Imaging plays an important role in injury identification and triage of affected neonates.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180122
[Lr] Last revision date:180122
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s13244-017-0586-x

  9 / 9037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29335053
[Au] Autor:Kim JM; Ryhn MJ; Stark TR
[Ad] Address:Staff oral and maxillofacial surgeon at the Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, K.Y., USA;, Email: nathankim812@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Facial Nerve Paresis: Case Report of Blunt Facial Nerve Injury.
[So] Source:Pediatr Dent;39(7):462-464, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1942-5473
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Facial nerve paresis is an uncommon but concerning condition in the pediatric population. The function and anatomy of the facial nerve is complex, and injuries to this structure may be associated with devastating physiological and psychological implications for the affected child and family. The purpose of this paper was to report a case involving a six-year-old Caucasian female who suffered a blunt traumatic injury to the orofacial region resulting in partial paralysis of the seventh cranial nerve. Following the injury, the child was unable to fully elevate the corner of her mouth. The deficit occurred immediately, and she experienced a prolonged course of recovery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 9037 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29187691
[Au] Autor:Fujiwara S; Yoshimura H; Nishiya K; Oshima K; Kawamoto M; Kohara N
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital.
[Ti] Title:[Tapia's syndrome following transesophageal echocardiography during an open-heart operation: a case report].
[So] Source:Rinsho Shinkeigaku;57(12):785-787, 2017 Dec 27.
[Is] ISSN:1882-0654
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:A 67-year-old man presented with hoarseness, dysarthria and deviation of the tongue to the left side the day after the open-heart operation under general anesthesia. Brain MRI demonstrated no causal lesion, and laryngoscope showed left vocal cord abductor palsy, so we diagnosed him with Tapia's syndrome (i.e., concomitant paralysis of the left recurrent and hypoglossal nerve). His neurological symptoms recovered gradually and improved completely four months after the onset. Tapia's syndrome is a rare condition caused by the extra cranial lesion of the recurrent laryngeal branch of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nerve, and mostly described as a complication of tracheal intubation. In this case, transesophageal echo probe has been held in the left side of the pharynx, so compression to the posterior wall of pharynx by the probe resulted in this condition, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Tapia's syndrome due to transesophageal echocardiography during an open-heart operation. This rare syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis of dysarthria and tongue deviation after a procedure associated with compression to the pharynx.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Echocardiography, Transesophageal/adverse effects
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases/etiology
Intraoperative Complications/etiology
Vocal Cord Paralysis/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Diagnosis, Differential
Dysarthria/etiology
Echocardiography, Transesophageal/instrumentation
Humans
Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases/diagnosis
Male
Syndrome
Vocal Cord Paralysis/diagnosis
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180112
[Lr] Last revision date:180112
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.5692/clinicalneurol.cn-001097


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