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[PMID]: 29520789
[Au] Autor:Sousa-Baena MS; Lohmann LG; Hernandes-Lopes J; Sinha NR
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Botânica, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, 05508-090, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:The molecular control of tendril development in angiosperms.
[So] Source:New Phytol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1469-8137
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The climbing habit has evolved multiple times during the evolutionary history of angiosperms. Plants evolved various strategies for climbing, such as twining stems, tendrils and hooks. Tendrils are threadlike organs with the ability to twine around other structures through helical growth; they may be derived from a variety of structures, such as branches, leaflets and inflorescences. The genetic capacity to grow as a tendrilled climber existed in some of the earliest land plants; however, the underlying molecular basis of tendril development has been studied in only a few taxa. Here, we summarize what is known about the molecular basis of tendril development in model and candidate model species from key tendrilled families, that is, Fabaceae, Vitaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Passifloraceae and Bignoniaceae. Studies on tendril molecular genetics and development show the molecular basis of tendril formation and ontogenesis is diverse, even when tendrils have the same ontogenetic origin, for example leaflet-derived tendrils in Fabaceae and Bignoniaceae. Interestingly, all tendrils perform helical growth during contact-induced coiling, indicating that such ability is not correlated with their ontogenetic origin or phylogenetic history. Whether the same genetic networks are involved during helical growth in diverse tendrils still remains to be investigated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nph.15073

  2 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501845
[Au] Autor:Moreno CT; Martínez GC; Martínez MM; Ferrer JEJ; Chaverri JP; Arrellín G; Zamilpa A; Campos ONM; Earl GL; Cruz GJB; Hernández B; Ramírez CC; Santana MA; Fragoso G; Rosas G
[Ad] Address:Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México, CP 62350.
[Ti] Title:Acetone fraction from Sechium edule (Jacq.) S.w. edible roots exhibits anti-endothelial dysfunction activity.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: A recent ethnomedical survey on medicinal plants grown in Mexico revealed that Sechium edule (Jacq.) Sw. (Cucurbitaceae) is one of the most valued plant species to treat cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Fruits, young leaves, buds, stems, and tuberous roots of the plant are edible. Considering that endothelial dysfunction induced by Angiotensin II plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and is accompanied by a prooxidative condition, which in turn induces an inflammatory state, vascular remodeling, and tissue damage, and that S. edule has been reported to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antihypertensive activity, its capability to control endothelial dysfunction was also assessed. AIM OF THE STUDY: To assess in vivo the anti-endothelial dysfunction activity of the acetone fraction (rSe-ACE) of the hydroalcoholic extract from S. edule roots. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Endothelial dysfunction was induced in female C57BL/6J mice by a daily intraperitoneal injection of angiotensin II for 10 weeks. Either rSe-ACE or losartan (as a control) were co-administered with angiotensin II for the same period. Blood pressure was measured at weeks 0, 5, and 10. Kidney extracts were prepared to determine IL1ß, IL4, IL6, IL10, IL17, IFNγ, TNFα, and TGFß levels by ELISA, along with the prooxidative status as assessed by the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The expression of ICAM-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in kidney histological sections. Kidney and hepatic damage, as well as vascular tissue remodeling, were studied. RESULTS: The rSe-ACE fraction administered at a dose of 10mg/kg was able to control hypertension, as well as the prooxidative and proinflammatory status in kidney as efficiently as losartan, returning mice to normotensive levels. Additionally, the fraction was more efficient than losartan to prevent liver and kidney damage. Phytochemical characterization identified cinnamic acid as a major compound, and linoleic, palmitic, and myristic acids as the most abundant non-polar components in the mixture, previously reported to aid in the control of hypertension, inflammation, and oxidative stress, three important components of endothelial dysfunction. IN CONCLUSION: this study demonstrated that rSe-ACE has anti-endothelial dysfunction activity in an experimental model and highlights the role of cinnamic acid and fatty acids in the observed effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29448137
[Au] Autor:Gonda I; Davidovich-Rikanati R; Bar E; Lev S; Jhirad P; Meshulam Y; Wissotsky G; Portnoy V; Burger J; Schaffer AA; Tadmor Y; Giovannoni JJ; Fei Z; Fait A; Katzir N; Lewinsohn E
[Ad] Address:Institute of Plant Sciences, Newe Ya'ar Research Center, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, P.O. Box 1021, Ramat Yishay, 30095, Israel; The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84105, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Differential metabolism of L-phenylalanine in the formation of aromatic volatiles in melon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit.
[So] Source:Phytochemistry;148:122-131, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3700
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Studies on the active pathways and the genes involved in the biosynthesis of L-phenylalanine-derived volatiles in fleshy fruits are sparse. Melon fruit rinds converted stable-isotope labeled L-phe into more than 20 volatiles. Phenylpropanes, phenylpropenes and benzenoids are apparently produced via the well-known phenylpropanoid pathway involving phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and being (E)-cinnamic acid a key intermediate. Phenethyl derivatives seemed to be derived from L-phe via a separate biosynthetic route not involving (E)-cinnamic acid and PAL. To explore for a biosynthetic route to (E)-cinnamaldehyde in melon rinds, soluble protein cell-free extracts were assayed with (E)-cinnamic acid, CoA, ATP, NADPH and MgSO , producing (E)-cinnamaldehyde in vitro. In this context, we characterized CmCNL, a gene encoding for (E)-cinnamic acid:coenzyme A ligase, inferred to be involved in the biosynthesis of (E)-cinnamaldehyde. Additionally we describe CmBAMT, a SABATH gene family member encoding a benzoic acid:S-adenosyl-L-methionine carboxyl methyltransferase having a role in the accumulation of methyl benzoate. Our approach leads to a more comprehensive understanding of L-phe metabolism into aromatic volatiles in melon fruit.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  4 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29341923
[Au] Autor:Bobbili KB; Datta D; Mondal S; Polepalli S; Pohlentz G; Mormann M; Swamy MJ
[Ad] Address:School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, 500 046, India.
[Ti] Title:Purification, chitooligosaccharide binding properties and thermal stability of CIA24, a new PP2-like phloem exudate lectin from ivy gourd (Coccinia indica).
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PP2-like chitin binding phloem exudate lectins, abundant in the sieve tube of cucurbits, have been implicated to play key roles in wound sealing and antipathogenic responses of the plant. Here we report the affinity purification, macromolecular characterization and carbohydrate binding properties of a new chitooligosaccharide-specific lectin from the phloem exudate of ivy gourds (Coccinia indica). The protein, CIA24, has a subunit mass of 24 kDa. Partial sequence analysis indicated that CIA24 exhibits high homology with CIA17 and other Cucurbitaceae PP2 proteins whereas CD spectroscopic studies suggested that ß-sheets constitute the predominant secondary structure. Temperature dependent CD spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric studies revealed that CIA24 is a highly thermostable protein, which undergoes complete unfolding at ∼105 °C. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies suggested that binding of chitooligosaccharides to CIA24 is a highly exothermic process. The lectin combining site can accommodate upto a tetrasaccharide with the binding stoichiometry (n) close to unity with respect to each protein subunit, whereas for chitohexaose a sharp decrease in the binding stoichiometry (n) to ∼1:0.5 was observed. This suggests that the protein probably undergoes dimerisation in presence of chitohexaose, wherein two protein molecules bind to the oligosaccharides from the reducing and non-reducing end, respectively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29218572
[Au] Autor:Peng X; Pan H; Muhammad A; An H; Fang S; Li W; Zhang S
[Ad] Address:Engineering Research Centre of Ecology and Agricultural Use of Wetland, Ministry of Education, Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Grain Industry, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, 434025, Hubei, China.
[Ti] Title:Complete genome sequence of a new strain of Lagenaria siceraria endornavirus from China.
[So] Source:Arch Virol;163(3):805-808, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-8798
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An RNA virus tentatively named Lagenaria siceraria endornavirus-Hubei (LsEV-HuB) was isolated from Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida in Hubei, China. The LsEV-HuB genome consists of 15,098 bp and contains a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a large protein with several conserved domains, including one helicase domain, one glycosyltransferase domain, two capsular polysaccharide synthesis protein (CPS) domains, and one RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain. LsEV-HuB has nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities of 72.96% and 77.95%, respectively, to Lagenaria siceraria endornavirus-California (LsEV-CA), the closest relative of LsEV-HuB.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cucurbitaceae/virology
DNA, Viral/genetics
Genome, Viral
Phylogeny
Polyproteins/genetics
RNA Viruses/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amino Acid Sequence
China
Genome Size
Open Reading Frames
Plant Diseases/virology
RNA Viruses/classification
RNA Viruses/isolation & purification
Recombination, Genetic
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Whole Genome Sequencing
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Viral); 0 (Polyproteins)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171209
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00705-017-3664-y

  6 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29186965
[Au] Autor:Park D; Kim H; Hahn Y
[Ti] Title:Genome sequence of a distinct watermelon mosaic virus identified from ginseng (Panax ginseng) transcriptome.
[So] Source:Acta Virol;61(4):479-482, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0001-723X
[Cp] Country of publication:Slovakia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) is a member of the genus Potyvirus, which is the largest genus of plant viruses. WMV is a significant pathogen of crop plants, including Cucurbitaceae species. A WMV strain, designated as WMV-Pg, was identified in transcriptome data collected from ginseng (Panax ginseng) root. WMV-Pg showed 84% nucleotide sequence identity and 91% amino acid sequence identity with its closest related virus, WMV-Fr. A phylogenetic analysis of WMV-Pg with other WMVs and soybean mosaic viruses (SMVs) indicated that WMV-Pg is a distinct subtype of the WMV/SMV group of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.4149/av_2017_410

  7 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29461217
[Au] Autor:Gandolfo-Cano M; González-de-Olano D; González-Mancebo E; Mohedano-Vicente E; Pastor-Vargas C; Bartolomé-Zavala B
[Ad] Address:Unidad de Alergología, Hospital Universitario de Fuenlabrada, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Cross-reactivity Between nsLTPs From Cucurbitaceae Peels.
[So] Source:J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol;28(1):65-66, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1018-9068
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.18176/jiaci.0211

  8 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438476
[Au] Autor:Buchanan AL; Hooks CRR
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD.
[Ti] Title:Influence of Winter Cover Crop Mulch on Arthropods in a Reduced Tillage Cucurbit System.
[So] Source:Environ Entomol;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1938-2936
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Winter cover crop mulches can diversify agricultural habitats and provide a range of benefits for crop production and pest management. Here we report the influence of strip tilled winter cover crop mulches on arthropod abundance in organic vegetable plots. Crookneck squash (Cucurbita pepo L.; Cucurbitales: Cucurbitaceae) was direct seeded into mowed and strip tilled barley (Hordeum vulgare L.; Poales: Poaceae), crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.; Fabales: Fabaceae), a barley + crimson clover mixture, or a no-cover crop control. Arthropods on squash plants were assessed weekly using visual counts. Seed predation was assessed using weed seed arenas. In 2013, mixed species cover crops produced the most ground cover, fewest weeds, and largest squash plants, but herbivore and predator abundance were not correlated with any of those factors. In 2014, mixed species cover crops again produced the most ground cover and fewest weeds, but the largest squash plants were found in no-cover crop control plots, which also had the highest herbivore abundance per plant. Predator and herbivore abundance were positively correlated with squash plant size in 2014. There were no differences in seed predation across treatments. Differences in ground cover biomass and weed presence between the 2 yr may have contributed to differences in squash plant quality and subsequent herbivore abundance between seasons. Results suggest that arthropods on plants responded largely indirectly to cover crops through host plant quality. Results are interpreted in light of overall costs and benefits of cover cropping.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ee/nvy004

  9 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29272993
[Au] Autor:El-Keblawy A; Shabana HA; Navarro T; Soliman S
[Ad] Address:Department of Applied Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Sharjah, P. O. Box, 27272, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. akeblawy@sharjah.ac.ae.
[Ti] Title:Effect of maturation time on dormancy and germination of Citrullus colocynthis (Cucurbitaceae) seeds from the Arabian hyper-arid deserts.
[So] Source:BMC Plant Biol;17(1):263, 2017 12 22.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2229
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Light and temperatures of germination greatly affect germination of several Cucurbitaceae species. Environmental conditions prevailing at seed maturation time can affect dormancy and germination requirements. Citrullus colocynthis seeds have a deep dormancy. This perennial prostrate shrub grows all over the year in the arid Arabian deserts. We explored if seed dormancy and germination requirements of C. colocynthis depend on time of fruit collection. Matured seeds were collected at five different times during 2014/2015 year from a population around Dubai city. Fresh seeds were germinated at three temperature regimes in both continuous darkness and alternating 12 h light/12 h darkness. Impacts of seed storage and other treatments on germination were applied on seeds collected in March and exhibited deep dormancy. RESULTS: March collected seeds almost did not germinate in both light and dark at the three temperatures, but those of the other collections responded differently to both light and temperatures. At the lowest temperatures, seeds of all collections did not germinate in light, but those of June, October and December collections germinated in dark. There were negative correlations between final germination and seed length, width, mass and coat thickness. Physical scarification, water soaking and seed storage did not break dormancy of March collection. CONCLUSIONS: Germination of C. colocynthis is very sensitive to light and incubation temperature as well as to the environmental conditions associated with the time of seed maturation. It is important to investigate the effects of environmental factors prevailing during seed maturation under controlled conditions to understand exact reasons for unusual seed dormancy and germination requirements of C. colocynthis, which seems to be very sensitive to maternal environment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12870-017-1209-x

  10 / 1683 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29295571
[Au] Autor:Zhang Z; Liu L; Wu H; Liu L; Kang B; Peng B; Gu Q
[Ad] Address:Henan Key Laboratory of Fruit and Cucurbit Biology, Zhengzhou Fruit Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Zhengzhou 450009, China. zhangzhenweiv@163.com.
[Ti] Title:The 96th Amino Acid of the Coat Protein of Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Affects Virus Infectivity.
[So] Source:Viruses;10(1), 2017 Dec 25.
[Is] ISSN:1999-4915
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) is one of the most devastating viruses infecting members of the family Cucurbitaceae. The assembly initiation site of CGMMV is located in the coding region of the coat protein, which is not only involved in virion assembly but is also a key factor determining the long-distance movement of the virus. To understand the effect of assembly initiation site and the adjacent region on CGMMV infectivity, we created a GTT deletion mutation in the GAGGTTG assembly initiation site of the infectious clone of CGMMV, which we termed V97 (deletion mutation at residue 97 of coat protein), followed by the construction of the V94A and T104A mutants. We observed that these three mutations caused mosaic after -mediated transformation in , albeit with a significant delay compared to the wild type clone. The mutants also had a common spontaneous E96K mutation in the coat protein. These results indicated that the initial assembly site and the sequence of the adjacent region affected the infectivity of the virus and that E96 might play an essential role in this process. We constructed two single point mutants-E96A and E96K-and three double mutants-V94A-E96K, V97-E96K and T104A-E96K-to further understand the role of E96 in CGMMV pathogenesis. After inoculation in , E96A showed delayed systemic symptoms, but the E96K and three double mutants exhibited typical symptoms of mosaic at seven days post-infection. Then, sap from CGMMV-infected leaves was mechanically inoculated on watermelon plants. We confirmed that E96 affected CGMMV infection using double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and sequencing, which further confirmed the successful infection of the related mutants, and that E96K can compensate the effect of the V94, V97, and T104 mutations on virus infectivity. In addition, Northern blotting showed that the accumulation of viral RNA corroborated the severity of the symptoms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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